Cardiology in the Young

Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP)

Journal description

Cardiology in the Young is devoted to cardiovascular issues affecting the young, and the older patient suffering the sequels of congenital heart disease, or other cardiac diseases acquired in childhood. The journal serves the interests of all professionals concerned with these topics. By design, the journal is international and multidisciplinary in its approach, and members of the editorial board take an active role in the its mission, helping to make it the essential journal in paediatric cardiology. All aspects of paediatric cardiology are covered within the journal. The content includes original articles, brief reports, editorials, reviews, and papers devoted to continuing professional development. High-quality colour figures are published on a regular basis, and without charge to the authors. Regular supplements are published containing the abstracts of the annual meetings of the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology, and the proceedings of the meetings organised annually by the Children's Heart Institute of Florida, and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The Editorial team is currently looking to expand the number of Supplements published each year. These are supplied free to subscribers."

Current impact factor: 0.84

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 0.835
2013 Impact Factor 0.857
2012 Impact Factor 0.948
2011 Impact Factor 0.759
2010 Impact Factor 0.858
2009 Impact Factor 1.183
2008 Impact Factor 0.956
2007 Impact Factor 0.912
2006 Impact Factor 0.884
2005 Impact Factor 0.471
2004 Impact Factor 0.433
2003 Impact Factor 0.595
2002 Impact Factor 0.73
2001 Impact Factor 0.665
2000 Impact Factor 0.615
1999 Impact Factor 0.642

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.98
Cited half-life 6.70
Immediacy index 0.09
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.36
Website Cardiology in the Young website
Other titles Cardiology in the young (Online)
ISSN 1467-1107
OCLC 55143040
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Cambridge University Press (CUP)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's Pre-print on author's personal website, departmental website, social media websites, institutional repository, non-commercial subject-based repositories, such as PubMed Central, Europe PMC or arXiv
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website on acceptance of publication
    • Author's post-print on departmental website, institutional repository, non-commercial subject-based repositories, such as PubMed Central, Europe PMC or arXiv, after a 6 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published abstract may be deposited
    • Pre-print to record acceptance for publication
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher last reviewed on 07/10/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Cambridge University Press (CUP)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: In the era of multi-modality imaging, this study compared contemporary, pre-operative echocardiography and cardiac MRI in predicting the need for intervention on additional lesions before surgical bidirectional cavopulmonary connection. Methods: A total of 72 patients undergoing bidirectional cavopulmonary connection for single-ventricle palliation between 2007 and 2012, who underwent pre-operative assessment using both echocardiography and MRI, were included. The pre-determined outcome measure was any additional surgical or catheter-based intervention within 6 months of bidirectional cavopulmonary connection. Indices assessed were as follows: indexed dimensions of right and left pulmonary arteries, coarctation of the aorta, adequacy of interatrial communication, and degree of atrioventricular valve regurgitation. Results: Median age at bidirectional cavopulmonary connection was 160 days (interquartile range 121-284). The following MRI parameters predicted intervention: Z score for right pulmonary artery (odds ratio 1.77 (95% confidence interval 1.12-2.79, p=0.014)) and left pulmonary artery dimensions (odds ratio 1.45 (1.04-2.00, p=0.027)) and left pulmonary artery report conclusion (odds ratio 1.57 (1.06-2.33)). The magnetic resonance report predicted aortic arch intervention (odds ratio 11.5 (3.5-37.7, p=0.00006)). The need for atrioventricular valve repair was associated only with magnetic resonance regurgitation fraction score (odds ratio 22.4 (1.7-295.1, p=0.018)). Echocardiography assessment was superior to MRI for predicting intervention on interatrial septum (odds ratio 27.7 (6.3-121.6, p=0.00001)). Conclusion: For branch pulmonary arteries, aortic arch, and atrioventricular valve regurgitation, MRI parameters more reliably predict the need for intervention; however, echocardiography more accurately identified the adequacy of interatrial communication. Approaching bidirectional cavopulmonary connection, the diagnostic strengths of MRI and echocardiography should be acknowledged when considering intervention.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Surgical vegetectomy may be indicated in patients with unresolving sepsis, heart failure, recurrent embolism, or the presence of large vegetations >10 mm in size. Percutaneous vegetectomy using a snare may be a reasonable option instead of open-heart surgery in selected patients. We describe the case of a patient with operated tetralogy of Fallot and infective endocarditis who underwent vegetectomy via a percutaneous approach.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Surgical repair for cardiac lesions has rarely been offered to patients with trisomy 18 because of their very short lifespans. We investigated the effectiveness of cardiac surgery in patients with trisomy 18. Patients and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 20 consecutive patients with trisomy 18 and congenital cardiac anomalies who were evaluated between August, 2003 and July, 2013. All patients developed respiratory or cardiac failure due to excessive pulmonary blood flow. Patients were divided into two subgroups: one treated surgically (surgical group, n=10) and one treated without surgery (conservative group, n=10), primarily to compare the duration of survival between the groups. Results: All the patients in the surgical group underwent cardiac surgery with pulmonary artery banding, including patent ductus arteriosus ligation in nine patients and coarctation repair in one. The duration of survival was significantly longer in the surgical group than in the conservative group (495.4±512.6 versus 93.1±76.2 days, respectively; p=0.03). A Cox proportional hazard model found cardiac surgery to be a significant predictor of survival time (risk ratio of 0.12, 95% confidence interval 0.016-0.63; p=0.01). Conclusions: Cardiac surgery was effective in prolonging survival by managing high pulmonary blood flow; however, the indication for surgery should be carefully considered on a case-by-case basis, because the risk of sudden death remains even after surgery. Patients' families should be provided with sufficient information to make decisions that will optimise the quality of life for both patients and their families.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: At present, there are many pacing strategies for young patients with complete atrioventricular block. The most frequent policy is to attempt placing a dual-chamber system when possible; however, there is a group of patients that is functioning with a non-synchronous ventricular pacing, raising the question of the ideal timing to upgrade their systems. We investigated the exercise performance of a group of children and young adults with complete atrioventricular block and dual-chamber pacemakers in both single- and dual-chamber pacing modalities. A total of 15 patients performed maximal exercise stress testing after programming the VVIR or DDD modes with 2 hours of interval in a double-blind study protocol. Compared with VVIR pacing, DDD pacing resulted in increase in the peak VO2, longer test duration, major increase in the heart rate achieved during peak exercise, decreased systemic non-invasive arterial blood pressure measured at maximal exercise, higher maximal workload, prolongation of the anaerobic threshold timing, and better self-rated performance perception in all the patients. Synchronous atrioventricular pacing contributes to an increase in both the exercise performance and the performance perception in 100% of the patients. This difference contributes to create a sense of “fitness” with repercussions in the overall health, self-esteem, and life quality, as well as encourages youngster to practice sports. Our experience tends to favour upgrading patients’ systems to dual-chamber systems before reaching the adolescent years, even if the centre policy is to prolong as long as possible the epicardial site in order to avoid long years of right ventricular pacing.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the case of a neonate with pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum and coronary cameral fistulae despite having a subsystemic right ventricle. We review the literature on coronary cameral fistulae in this disease and right ventricle-dependent coronary circulation. We discuss the potential consequences of this physiology, including risk of adverse cardiovascular events that may impact risk stratification and surgical palliation.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Heart murmurs are common in children and may represent congenital or acquired cardiac pathology. Auscultation is challenging and many primary-care physicians lack the skill to differentiate innocent from pathologic murmurs. We sought to determine whether computer-aided auscultation (CardioscanTM) identifies which children require referral to a cardiologist. Methods: We consecutively enrolled children aged between 0 and 17 years with a murmur, innocent or pathologic, being evaluated in a tertiary-care cardiology clinic. Children being evaluated for the first time and patients with known cardiac pathology were eligible. We excluded children who had undergone cardiac surgery previously or were unable to sit still for auscultation. CardioscanTM auscultation was performed in a quiet room with the subject in the supine position. The sensitivity and specificity of a potentially pathologic murmur designation by CardioscanTM - that is, requiring referral - was determined using echocardiography as the reference standard. Results: We enrolled 126 subjects (44% female) with a median age of 1.7 years, with 93 (74%) having cardiac pathology. The sensitivity and specificity of a potentially pathologic murmur determination by CardioscanTM for identification of cardiac pathology were 83.9 and 30.3%, respectively, versus 75.0 and 71.4%, respectively, when limited to subjects with a heart rate of 50-120 beats per minute. The combination of a CardioscanTM potentially pathologic murmur designation or an abnormal electrocardiogram improved sensitivity to 93.5%, with no haemodynamically significant lesions missed. Conclusions: Sensitivity of CardioscanTM when interpreted in conjunction with an abnormal electrocardiogram was high, although specificity was poor. Re-evaluation of computer-aided auscultation will remain necessary as advances in this technology become available.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Neonates with critical CHD have evidence, by imaging, of preoperative brain injury, although the timing is unknown. We used circulating postnatal serum glial fibrillary acidic protein as a measure of acute perinatal brain injury in neonates with CHD. Glial fibrillary acidic protein was measured on admission and daily for the first 4 days of life in case and control groups; we included two control groups in this study – non-brain-injured newborns and brain-injured newborns. Comparisons were performed using the Kruskal–Wallis test with Dunn’s multiple comparisons, Student’s t-test, and χ 2 test of independence where appropriate. In aggregate, there were no significant differences in overall glial fibrillary acidic protein levels between CHD patients (n=56) and negative controls (n=23) at any time point. By day 4 of life, 7/56 (12.5%) CHD versus 0/23 (0%) normal controls had detectable glial fibrillary acidic protein levels. Although not statistically significant, the 5/10 (50%) left heart obstruction group versus 1/17 (6%) conoventricular, 0/13 (0%) right heart, and 1/6 (17%) septal defect patients trended towards elevated levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein at day 4 of life. Overall, glial fibrillary acidic protein reflected no evidence for significant peripartum brain injury in neonates with CHD, but there was a trend for elevation by postnatal day 4 in neonates with left heart obstruction. This pilot study suggests that methods such as monitoring glial fibrillary acidic protein levels may provide new tools to optimise preoperative care and neuroprotection in high-risk neonates with specific types of CHD.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Methods: A comprehensive literature review on cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa was carried out. Results: There are structural, functional, and rhythm-type changes that occur in patients with anorexia nervosa. These become progressively significant as ongoing weight loss occurs. Conclusion: Cardiac changes are inherent to anorexia nervosa and they become more life-threatening and serious as the anorexia nervosa becomes increasingly severe. Weight restoration and attention to these cardiac changes are crucial for a successful treatment outcome.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Methods: In the present study, we utilised a unique data set consisting of prospectively collected clinical data from the Pediatric Heart Network Single Ventricle Reconstruction trial linked at the patient level with cost data for 10 hospitals participating in the Children's Hospital Association Case Mix database during the trial period. The relationship between complications and cost was modelled using linear regression, accounting for the skewed distribution of cost, adjusting for within-centre clustering and baseline patient characteristics. Results: A total of 334 eligible Norwood records (97.5%) were matched between data sets. Overall, 82% suffered from at least one complication (median 2; with a range from 0 to 33). Those with complications had longer postoperative length of stay (25 versus 12 days, p<0.001), more total ventilator days (7 versus 5 days, p<0.001), and higher in-hospital mortality (17.6 versus 3.4%, p<0.006). Mean adjusted hospital cost in those with a complication was $190,689 (95% CI $111,344-$326,577) versus $120,584 (95% CI $69,246-$209,983) in those without complications (p=0.002). Costs increased with the number of complications (1-2 complications=$132,800 versus 3-4 complications=$182,353 versus ⩾5 complications=$309,372 [p<0.001]). Conclusions: This merged data set of clinical trial and cost data demonstrated that postoperative complications are common following the Norwood operation and are associated with worse clinical outcomes and higher costs. Efforts to reduce complications in this population may lead to improved outcomes and cost savings.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A 19-year-old woman with atrial septal defect treated percutaneously with an Amplatzer Septal Occluder 24 months earlier, who presented with a history of bacterial meningitis, was admitted with a diagnosis of endocarditis. After 6 weeks of treatment with antibiotics, the incompletely endothelialised occluder was surgically removed. The present report illustrates the need for long-term follow-up of patients who have received nitinol wire mesh occluders.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We aimed to elucidate the relationship between severity of secondary mitral regurgitation and mitral valve geometry in children with dilated cardiomyopathy. The medical records of 16 children with dilated cardiomyopathy (median age, 1.2 years; range, 0.4–12.3 years) were reviewed. Mitral valve geometry was evaluated by measuring coaptation depth using echocardiographic apical four-chamber views at the initial presentation. Patients were dichotomised according to the mitral regurgitation severity: patients with moderate or severe secondary mitral regurgitation (n=6) and those with mild secondary mitral regurgitation (n=10). A total of 58 healthy children were considered as normal controls, and a regression equation to predict coaptation depth by body surface area was derived: coaptation depth [mm]=4.37+1.34×ln (body surface area [m 2 ]) (residual standard error, 0.49; adjusted R 2 , 0.68; p<0.0001). Compared with patients with mild secondary mitral regurgitation, those with moderate or severe secondary mitral regurgitation had significantly larger coaptation depth z-scores (6.4±2.3 versus 1.9±1.4, p<0.005), larger mitral annulus diameter z-scores (3.6±2.6 versus 0.9±1.8, p<0.05), higher left ventricular sphericity index (0.89±0.07 versus 0.79±0.06, p<0.005), and greater left ventricular fraction shortening (0.15±0.05 versus 0.09±0.05, p<0.05). In conclusion, geometric alteration in the mitral valve and the left ventricle is associated with the severity of secondary mitral regurgitation in paediatric dilated cardiomyopathy, which would provide a theoretical background to surgical intervention for secondary mitral regurgitation in paediatric populations.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Kawasaki disease is a small-to-medium-vessel vasculitis of unknown origin that predominantly affects children, although the disease can occur in adults. We report the case of a 26-year-old paediatric resident with fever, exanthema, ocular changes, arthralgia, and desquamation of palms and soles. Diagnosis was established after the fever resolved, and no treatment with intravenous gammaglobulin was administered. His echocardiogram showed normal coronary arteries. Acute Kawasaki disease in adults is a rare and under-recognised condition. It is important to consider the disease in patients with prolonged fever associated with unusual clinical features.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Strong recommendations have been made for the periodic developmental surveillance, screening, and evaluation of children with CHD. This supports similar calls for all at-risk children in order to provide timely, structured early developmental intervention that may improve outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of screening for language delay after life-saving therapies using the parent-completed vocabulary screen of the language Development Survey, by comparing screening with the individually administered language scores of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third edition. Method: In total, 310 (92.5%) of 335 eligible term-born children, born between 2004 and 2011, receiving complex cardiac surgery, heart or liver transplantation, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in infancy, were assessed at 21.5 (2.8) months of age (lost, 25 (7.5%)), through developmental/rehabilitation centres at six sites as part of the Western Canadian Complex Pediatric Therapies Follow-up Group. Results: Vocabulary screening delay was defined as scores ⩽15th percentile. Language delay defined as scores >1 SD below the mean was calculated for language composite score, receptive and expressive communication scores of the Bayley-III. Delayed scores for the 310 children were as follows: vocabulary, 144 (46.5%); language composite, 125 (40.3%); receptive communication, 98 (31.6%); and expressive communication, 124 (40%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values of screened vocabulary delay for tested language composite delay were 79.2, 75.7, 68.8, and 84.3%, respectively. Conclusion: High rates of language delay after life-saving therapies are concerning. Although the screening test appears to over-identify language delay relative to the tested Bayley-III, it may be a useful screening tool for early language development leading to earlier referral for intervention.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Unilateral pulmonary artery atresia is a rare congenital defect. The affected lung in unilateral pulmonary artery atresia usually receives its blood supply from many collateral vessels including the coronary artery. We report a case of an elderly woman with suspected anginal symptoms who had a coronary artery fistula functioning as a collateral vessel due to unilateral pulmonary artery atresia.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present a rare late manifestation of systemic venous collaterals in a 17-year-old female, 16 years after bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis, resulting in clinically unacceptable desaturation with progressive effort intolerance and cyanosis.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An infant presented with features suggestive of an anomalous left coronary artery was found to have normal origins of both coronary arteries. Echocardiography during episodes of ischaemia showed marked aortic regurgitation with retrograde coronary flow. The left coronary leaflet was mildly hypoplastic. Surgical re-suspension of this leaflet prevented aortic regurgitation and the patient had no further symptoms and recovered cardiac function.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cardiology in the Young
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Social media is any type of communication utilising electronic technology that follows two guiding principles: free publishing or sharing of content and ideas and group collaboration and inter-connectedness. Over the last 10 years, social media technology has made tremendous inroads into all facets of communication. Modalities such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter are no longer viewed as new communication technologies. Owing to their tremendous usage, they are now common ways to conduct a dialogue with individuals and groups. Greater than 91% of teenagers and 89% of young adults routinely use social media. Further, 24% of teenagers reported being online "almost constantly". These forms of communication are readily used by individuals cared for in the field of paediatric cardiology; thus, they should carry significant interest for cardiology care providers; however, social media's influence on medicine extends beyond use by patients. It directly affects all medical providers, both users and non-users. Further, social media has the ability to improve care for patients with paediatric heart disease. This article details social media's current influence on paediatric cardiology, including considerations for professional use of social media and potential opportunities to improve cardiac care.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cardiology in the Young