The International Journal of Human Resource Management (Int J Hum Resource Manag)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

The International Journal of Human Resource Management is the forum for HRM scholars and professionals world-wide. Concerned with the expanding role of strategic human resource management in a fast-changing global environment, the Journal focuses on future trends in HRM, drawing on empirical research in the areas of strategic management, international business, organisational, personnel management and industrial relations. The International Journal of Human Resource Management encourages strategically focused articles on a wide range of issues including employee participation, human resource flow, reward systems and high commitment work systems. The Journal aims to address major issues arising from: internationalisation of market integration. increased competition. technological change. new concepts of line management. changing corporate climates.

Current impact factor: 0.93

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 1.65
Cited half-life 6.80
Immediacy index 0.09
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.39
Website International Journal of Human Resource Management website
Other titles International journal of human resource management (Online)
ISSN 1466-4399
OCLC 37786903
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The guidelines of the European Commission on corporate social responsibility stress the importance of sustainable employment for people with disabilities. The road to employment is however paved with obstacles, such as the often negative stereotypes and attitudes of employers and employees, which influence the treatment of people with disabilities at the work floor. In the present study, we build upon the Reasoned Action Approach to illuminate how and when stereotypes of employees toward people with disabilities relate to inclusive behavior at work. In a sample of 313 employee-colleague dyads, we found that the relationship between stereotypes (rated by employees) and inclusive behavior (rated by colleagues) is mediated by employee attitudes toward the employment of people with disabilities (targets). Moreover, work pressure functions as a boundary condition that shapes the relationship between stereotypes and inclusive behavior, in such a way that the relationship is stronger when work pressure is low. Research and practical implications are discussed in conclusion.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The guidelines of the European Commission on corporate social responsibility stress the importance of sustainable employment for people with disabilities. The road to employment is however paved with obstacles, such as the often negative stereotypes and attitudes of employers and employees, which influence the treatment of people with disabilities at the work floor. In the present study, we build upon the Reasoned Action Approach to illuminate how and when stereotypes of employees toward people with disabilities relate to inclusive behavior at work. In a sample of 313 employee-colleague dyads, we found that the relationship between stereotypes (rated by employees) and inclusive behavior (rated by colleagues) is mediated by employee attitudes toward the employment of people with disabilities (targets). Moreover, work pressure functions as a boundary condition that shapes the relationship between stereotypes and inclusive behavior, in such a way that the relationship is stronger when work pressure is low. Research and practical implications are discussed in conclusion.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In both industrialized and emerging countries, organizations increasingly seek to support employees’ efforts to maintain a healthy work–family balance. Research has identified two types of organizational support in this context: formal work–family programs and informal work–family cultures. This study examines the relative effects of work–family programs versus work–family culture on employees’ job satisfaction and performance in various cultural environments. Drawing on the individualism–collectivism cultural dimension introduced by Hofstede, it is argued that employees’ cultural background may affect family models, which in turn determine employees’ need for formal organizational work–family support, but are not related to employees’ need for informal support. In line with this notion, the results from comparisons of an industrialized country (the USA) with two emerging countries (China and India) show that work–family culture has positive effects in all three contexts. However, formal work–family programs positively affect job satisfaction and job performance only in India and the USA, whereas they exhibit no significant effect in the more collectivist setting of China.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The results of this qualitative study of international talent show that although the acquisition of career capital through international assignments is perceived to be desirable both from an individual and organisational perspective, the global mobility needs and preferences of these two parties rarely coincide. This is due to the fact that individual mobility requirements come in cycles aligned to life cycle stages whereas organisational mobility needs ebb and flow like waves in response to perceived threats and opportunities. This presents opportunities and challenges for individuals in the acquisition and utilisation of career capital to balance work and non-work related demands in their global Kaleidoscope Careers. The role of HRM is to facilitate this process through mentoring, networking and other opportunities to engage in storying enabling employees to accommodate their changing needs at different life cycle stages. Failure to offer such support can manifest itself in demotivation, business performance issues as well as difficulties in terms of diversity and inclusion. Thus this paper offers a contribution to academic literature in the field of career theory as well as international Human Resource Management professional practice.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management