Drug and Alcohol Review (Drug Alcohol Rev)

Publisher: Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs, Wiley

Journal description

Now in its eighteenth year of publication Drug and Alcohol Review is an international meeting ground for the views, expertise and experience of all those involved in the study of treatment of alcohol, tobacco and drug problems. Contributors to the journal examine and report on alcohol and drug abuse from a wide range of clinical, biomedical, psychological and sociological standpoints. Drug and Alcohol Review particularly encourages the submission of papers which have a harm reducation perspective. However, all philosophies will find a place in the journal: the principal criterion for publication of papers is their quality.

Current impact factor: 1.55

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 2.04
Cited half-life 5.30
Immediacy index 0.78
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.67
Website Drug and Alcohol Review website
Other titles Drug and alcohol review (Online), Drug and alcohol review, Drug & alcohol review
ISSN 1465-3362
OCLC 47916431
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo for scientific, technical and medicine titles
    • 2 years embargo for humanities and social science titles
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • On a non-profit server
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is not available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 6 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • If OnlineOpen is not available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • Reviewed 18/03/14
    • Please see former John Wiley & Sons and Blackwell Publishing policies for articles published prior to February 2007
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined rates of awareness of standard drink labelling and drinking guidelines among Australian adult drinkers. Demographic predictors of these two outcomes were also explored. Online survey panel participants aged 18–45 years(n = 1061; mean age = 33.2 years) completed an online survey assessing demographics, alcohol consumption patterns, awareness of standard drink labels and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) guidelines, and support for more detailed labels. The majority (80%) of participants had seen standard drink labels on alcohol products; with younger drinkers, those from a regional/rural location and high-risk drinkers significantly more likely to have seen such labelling. Most respondents estimated at or below the maximum number of drinks stipulated in the NHMRC guidelines. However, their estimates of the levels for male drinkers were significantly higher than for female drinkers. High-risk drinkers were significantly less likely to provide accurate estimates, while those who had seen the standard drink logo were significantly more likely to provide accurate estimates of drinking levels to reduce the risk of long-term harms only. Just under three-quarters of respondents supported the inclusion of more information on labels regarding guidelines to reduce negative health effects. The current standard drink labelling approach fails to address high-risk drinkers. The inclusion of information about NHMRC guidelines on alcohol labels, and placing standard drink labelling on the front of products could improve awareness of what constitutes a standard drink and safe levels of consumption among Australian drinkers.[Kerri Coomber, Sandra C. Jones, Florentine Martino, Peter G. Miller. Predictors of awareness of standard drink labelling and drinking guidelines to reduce negative health effects among Australian drinkers. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;00:000–000]
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Drug and Alcohol Review

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Drug and Alcohol Review
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction and aims: Field studies have indicated a recent increase in heroin availability and use in France, and yet very little is known about the mechanisms underlying heroin retail prices. This paper offers a first attempt at identifying the determinants of heroin pricing, to measure quantity discounts and assess the influence of purity on street prices, while controlling for a geographical effect. Design and methods: Data on heroin samples were collected during 2011 in seven urban areas of metropolitan France. Ordinary least squares regression was used to model the associations between price, quantity, purity and other independent variables. Results: Quantity remains the most influential variable on heroin pricing. We estimate that a 10% increase in the size of a transaction leads to a 2.3% decrease in the unit price. Assessed purity proved to be significant, although in modest proportion. Sociodemographic characteristics, such as gender, users' experience and relationships with dealers, proved to be insignificant. Heroin retail prices vary according to a geographical gradient related to the routes of entry and distribution. Discussion and conclusions: As a credence good, heroin retail prices in France are affected by more than simply the traditional supply and demand relationship. The results of this study also underline the limitations of a quantitative framework and should be complemented by further ethnographic research to obtain an in-depth understanding of local markets. Policies should be designed to better take local disparities into account.[Lahaie E, Janssen E, Cadet-Taïrou A. Determinants of heroin retail prices in metropolitan France:Discounts, purity and local markets. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;00:000-000].
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Review
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    ABSTRACT: In Australia and New Zealand, population groups who experience social disadvantage smoke at much higher rates than the general population. As there are limited data specific to these groups regarding the success of nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation, this commentary will provide an overview of the relevant international literature supplemented with observational data relevant to the policy contexts in Australia and New Zealand.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Review
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction and aims: Methamphetamine use is highly prevalent in parts of South Africa, and there is concern this will contribute to the country's substantial HIV epidemic. We examined the feasibility of implementing routine HIV testing at a community-based substance abuse treatment centre in Cape Town and determined the HIV sero-prevalence among methamphetamine users seeking treatment at this site. Design and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 293 participants completed measures of demographics, substance use and HIV treatment. HIV sero-prevalence was determined by a rapid finger-prick HIV test, and prior HIV diagnosis was confirmed via clinic records. Results: The majority of participants were male and self-identified as 'Coloured', with a mean age of 28 years. The HIV sero-prevalence was 3.8%. Of the 11 participants who tested HIV positive, four were newly diagnosed. HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants were comparable on demographic and substance use factors. Uptake of HIV testing among all clients at the drug treatment centre increased from <5% prior to study initiation to 89% after study completion. Measures implemented to ensure high rates of HIV testing were regarded as sustainable. Discussion and conclusions: Our study suggests that integrating routine HIV testing into substance abuse treatment is feasible in a community-based health centre. The low HIV prevalence among this sample of treatment-seeking methamphetamine users highlights the potential benefits of supporting expanded efforts to optimise HIV prevention with this young adult population. [Gouse H, Joska JA, Lion RR, Watt MH, Burnhams W, Carrico AW, Meade CS. HIV testing and sero-prevalence among methamphetamine users seeking substance abuse treatment in Cape Town. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;00:000-000].
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Review
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction and aims: Strategies are needed to transition persons who inject drugs out of injecting. We undertook this study to identify protective factors associated with cessation of injection drug use. Design and methods: Data were derived from three prospective cohorts of people who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada, between September 2005 and November 2011. Generalised estimating equations were used to examine protective factors and 6-month cessation of injection drug use. Results: Our sample of 1663 people who inject drugs included 563 (33.9%) women, and median age was 40 years. Overall, 904 (54.4%) individuals had at least one 6-month injection cessation event. In multivariable analysis, protective factors associated with cessation of injection drug use included the following: having a regular place to stay [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-1.48]; formal employment (AOR = 1.12; 95% CI 1.01-1.23); social support from personal contacts (AOR = 1.22; 95% CI 1.10-1.35); social support from professionals (AOR = 1.26; 95% CI 1.14-1.39); ability to access health and social services (AOR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.09-1.34); and positive self-rated health (AOR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.11-1.32). Discussion and conclusions: Over half of people who inject drugs in this study reported achieving 6-month cessation of injection drug use, with cessation being associated with a range of modifiable protective factors. Policy makers and practitioners should promote increased access to stable housing, employment, social support and other services to promote cessation of injection drug use. [Luchenski S, Ti L, Hayashi K, Dong H, Wood E, Kerr T. Protective factors associated with short-term cessation of injection drug use among a Canadian cohort of people who inject drugs Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;00:000-000].
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Review
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction and aims: Injecting drug use is a risk factor for deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and people who inject drugs commonly report injecting into the femoral vein. However, it is unclear whether the act of inserting a needle into the femoral vein or the pharmacodynamic properties of the injected drug increases DVT risk. We aimed to quantify the strength of association between injecting illicit drugs into the femoral vein and the odds of acquiring ileo-femoral DVT. Design and methods: We used case control methodology. The study took place in Leeds, UK. A total of 313 people who inject drugs (112 'cases' with a diagnosis of DVT from hospital accident and emergency departments and 201 'controls' with no DVT from needle exchanges) completed a questionnaire about their drug use and administration routes. Results: The act of injecting into the femoral vein was strongly associated with DVT (χ(2) (1) = 53.453, P < 0.001), a finding that remained significant after adjusting for the type of illicit drug injected, age, gender, smoking status and history of clotting disorder. Independent of the act of femoral vein injecting, after adjusting for the effects of potential confounders, crack cocaine use was significantly associated with DVT, whereas amphetamine and heroin use were negatively independently associated with DVT. Conclusions: The practice of injecting into the femoral vein in the groin and the practice of injecting crack cocaine are associated with the odds of acquiring ileo-femoral DVT. [Wright NMJ, Allgar V, Tompkins CNE. Associations between injecting illicit drugs into the femoral vein and deep vein thrombosis: A case control study. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;00:000-000].
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Review
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction and Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate health knowledge, attitudes and smokeless tobacco quit attempts and intentions among married women in rural Bangladesh. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using an interviewer administered, pretested, semistructured questionnaire. All 8082 women living in the Jhaudi and Ghotmajhee local government areas, aged ≥18 years with at least one pregnancy in their lifetime, were invited to participate. Questions covered smokeless tobacco consumption (STC), knowledge regarding its health effects, users' quit attempts and intentions and sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Eight thousand seventy-four women completed the survey (response rate 99.9%). Almost half (45%) of current consumers thought STC was good for their health and many ascribed medicinal values to it, for example 25% thought STC reduced stomach aches. A quarter had previously tried to quit and 10% intended to quit. After adjusting for potential confounders, inaccurate knowledge of STC health consequences was associated with being older [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=2.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.99-3.50], less educated (aOR=2.18, 95% CI 1.66-2.85), Muslim (aOR=17.0, 95% CI 12.0-23.9) and unemployed (aOR=29.7, 95% CI: 25.2-35.1). Having less education (aOR=2.52, 95% CI 0.98-6.45) and being unemployed (aOR=1.52, 95% CI 1.03-2.23) were associated with the intention to quit. Discussion and Conclusions: Large gaps exist in rural Bangladeshi women's understanding of the adverse health effects of STC. Health awareness campaigns should highlight the consequences of STC. Routine screening and cessation advice should be provided in primary healthcare and smokeless tobacco control strategies should be implemented. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Review
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract is available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Review
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract is available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Review
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction and aims: The number of older clients attending drug and alcohol (D&A) services is increasing, although there is insufficient knowledge regarding service needs for this group. The aim of this study was to document the patterns of substance use, health status, cognition, social conditions, and health service utilisation of older clients in D&A treatment. Design and methods: A cross-sectional observational study of 99 clients aged ≥50 years (M = 55, SD = 4.5; 77% male) attending specialist D&A services (N = 30 alcohol treatment, N = 69 opioid treatment) in Sydney, Australia. Participants completed a confidential research interview. Findings were compared to aggregated data from younger opioid substitution treatment (OST) clients attending the same services (N = 214). Results: Alcohol (46%), benzodiazepines (40%) and cannabis (38%) were the most commonly reported substances used in the past 4 weeks; 23% reported no recent substance use, and 17% reported using three or more drugs. Participants reported high levels of physical and mental health problems, social isolation, low levels of employment, and a third reported difficulties with daily living activities. Forty percent had been injured in a fall in the past 12 months. The mean Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-R score was 82.4 ± 9.6, with 40% performing at a level consistent with severe cognitive impairment. A significantly higher proportion of older participants used alcohol and benzodiazepines than younger clients, and older participants had significantly poorer psychological health, physical health and quality of life. Discussion and conclusions: D&A services will require strategies to address the complex physical, mental, cognitive and social problems of older clients. [Lintzeris N, Rivas C, Monds LA, Leung S, Withall A, Draper B. Substance use, health status and service utilisation of older clients attending specialist drug and alcohol services. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;●●:●●-●●].
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Review