International Journal for Quality in Health Care (Int J Qual Health Care)

Publisher: International Society for Quality in Health Care, Oxford University Press (OUP)

Journal description

The International Journal for Quality in Health Care makes activities and research related to quality in health care available to a worldwide readership. The Journal publishes papers in all disciplines related to the quality of health care including health services research health care evaluation technology assessment health economics utilization review cost containment and nursing care research as well as clinical research related to quality of care.

Current impact factor: 1.76

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.756
2013 Impact Factor 1.584
2012 Impact Factor 1.793
2011 Impact Factor 1.958
2010 Impact Factor 2.064
2009 Impact Factor 1.881
2008 Impact Factor 1.561
2007 Impact Factor 1.326
2006 Impact Factor 1.444
2005 Impact Factor 1.138
2004 Impact Factor 1.034
2003 Impact Factor 0.915
2002 Impact Factor 0.912

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.34
Cited half-life 7.80
Immediacy index 0.71
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.75
Website International Journal for Quality in Health Care website
Other titles International journal for quality in health care (Online)
ISSN 1464-3677
OCLC 43575542
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Oxford University Press (OUP)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print can only be posted prior to acceptance
    • Pre-print must be accompanied by set statement (see link)
    • Pre-print must not be replaced with post-print, instead a link to published version with amended set statement should be made
    • Pre-print on author's personal website, employer website, free public server or pre-prints in subject area
    • Post-print in Institutional repositories or Central repositories
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany archived copy (see policy)
    • Eligible authors may deposit in OpenDepot
    • The publisher will deposit in PubMed Central on behalf of NIH authors
    • Publisher last contacted on 19/02/2015
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Oxford University Press (OUP)'
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of a government-directed regional cardiovascular center (RCVC) project on the length of stay (LOS) and medical costs due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A retrospective claim data review. Forty hospitals including four RCVCs in Korea. A total of 1469 AMI patients who visited a RCVC in two regions between February 2009 and December 2011. RCVC project has been fostering specialized center by region for management of cardiovascular disease. It has built a system that could receive intensive care quickly within 3 h when disease occurred. Changes in the LOS and cost were evaluated using the difference-in-differences (DIDs) method combined with propensity score matching (1:1) and multilevel analysis with adjustment for patient's and institutional factors. The net effect of RCVC project implementation showed decline of LOS (-0.71 days) and total medical costs (-797 US dollars) by DID. After the RCVC project, the LOS for patients with AMI hospitalized in a RCVC was decreased by 8.9% (β = -0.094, P = 0.041) compared with patients hospitalized in a hospital not designed as a RCVC. Compared with costs before the RCVC project, they were decreased by 11.5% (β = -0.122, P = 0.004). We provided evidence regarding the change in the societal burden due to AMI after regionalization. Although there was a reduction of LOS and direct medical costs reported in limited number of regionalized hospitals, in the long term we can anticipate an expanding impact in all regionalized hospitals. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: To validate a patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measure for patients with hypertension. This was a validation study that employed mixed methods including classical test theory, item response theory, and reliability and validity evaluation. The community health centers in two Chinese cities. Fifteen patients participated in the pilot survey, and 641 patients completed the PRO survey. Classical test theory and item response theory were applied to the item selection. Evaluations and adjustments were based on results of reliability, validity, responsiveness and feasibility analyses. The item selection process produced a final scale with 4 domains (physiology, psychology, society and treatment), 12 subdomains and 56 items. According to confirmatory factor analysis, the construct validity was adequate. The split-half reliability, Cronbach's α coefficients and responsiveness both in each subdomain and in the whole scale were also acceptable, as was feasibility. Mixed methods were beneficial for developing this scale and could be applied to PROs in other health areas. The instrument provides a means for comprehensive assessment of the impact of hypertension, and for quantification of benefits of hypertension interventions from the patients' perspective. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: Knowledge about cancer patients' preferences in health care is important because it enables care to be patient centered. However, the literature does not provide an overview. The aim of this study was to identify the dimensions of hospital-based cancer care that patients evaluate the most important using Patient-rated importance as a method. PubMed was searched in 2013/2014. Studies were identified, if they were in accordance with specific search terms and focused on hospital-based cancer care. Totally, 11 studies were found. The 11 studies comprised a total of 598 items. Of these, 592 items were categorized into 19 care dimensions. The highest rated quartile of items was identified as care elements patients evaluated to be the most important. Identification of the most important dimensions was done by calculating the percentages of items within each dimension that were within the highest quartile. The 11 studies varied a lot in regard to aim and patient characteristics. The three most important dimensions were as follows: Rapid diagnosis and treatment; High professional standard; and Information about treatment and side(effects)/consequences. Within four dimensions, Psychosocial support, Physical facilities, Waiting time and Transparency in care, no items were within the highest quartile. Patient-rated importance was a useful method in identifying the care patients preferred. Due to a limited number of studies and great diversity within studies evaluated, interpretation of results should be cautious. However, it seems that cancer patients treated in hospitals with a curative intent find treatment-related information, professional standard and short delay of diagnosis and treatment most important. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: This study explores the association between coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) patients' residence and quality of care in terms of 30-day mortality. A retrospective, multilevel study design was conducted using claims data from Taiwan's Universal Health Insurance Scheme. Hospital and surgeon's CABG operation volume, risk-adjusted surgical site infection rate and risk-adjusted 30-day mortality rate in the previous year were adopted as performance indicators, and the level of quality was evaluated via K-means clustering algorithm. Baron and Kenny's procedures for mediation effect were conducted. Hospitals in Taiwan. Patients who underwent CABG surgeries from 1 January 2008 to 30 September 2011 were identified in this study. However, patients who were under the age of 18 years or above the age of 85(n = 164), with missing data for gender (n = 3) or received surgeries from surgeons who never performed any CABG surgeries (n = 27), were excluded. None. Thirty-day mortality. There were 9973 CABG surgeries included in this study. Patients who lived in urban areas received better quality of care (28.90 vs. 21.57%) and enjoyed better outcome (4.33 vs. 6.84%). After the procedure of mediation effect testing, the results showed that the relationship between patient residence's urbanization level and 30-day mortality was partially mediated by patterns of quality of care. The rural-dwelling CABG patients are less likely to approach the better performing healthcare providers, and this tendency indirectly affects their treatment outcomes. Policymakers still need to develop strategies to ensure better equity in access to quality health care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: To conduct a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of the safety and effectiveness of primary care provided by advanced practice nurses (APNs) and evaluate the potential of their deployment to help alleviate primary care shortages. PubMed, Medline and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. RCTs and their follow-up reports that compared outcomes of care provided to adults by APNs and physicians in equivalent primary care provider roles were selected for inclusion. Ten articles (seven RCTs, plus two economic evaluations and one 2-year follow-up study of included RCTs) met inclusion criteria. Data were extracted regarding study design, setting and outcomes across four common categories. The seven RCTs include data for 10 911 patients who presented for ongoing primary care (four RCTs) or same-day consultations for acute conditions (three RCTs) in the primary care setting. Study follow-up ranged from 1 day to 2 years. APN groups demonstrated equal or better outcomes than physician groups for physiologic measures, patient satisfaction and cost. APNs generally had longer consultations compared with physicians; however, two studies reported that APN patients required fewer consultations over time. There were few differences in primary care provided by APNs and physicians; for some measures APN care was superior. While studies are needed to assess longer term outcomes, these data suggest that the APN workforce is well-positioned to provide safe and effective primary care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the effect of factors within hospital pharmacists' practice on the likelihood of their reporting a medication safety incident. Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) survey. Twenty-one general and teaching hospitals in the North West of England. Two hundred and seventy hospital pharmacists (response rate = 45%). Hospital pharmacists were invited to complete a TPB survey, based on a prescribing error scenario that had resulted in serious patient harm. Multiple regression was used to determine the relative influence of different TPB variables, and participant demographics, on the pharmacists' self-reported intention to report the medication safety incident. The TPB variables predicting intention to report: attitude towards behaviour, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and descriptive norm. Overall, the hospital pharmacists held strong intentions to report the error, with senior pharmacists being more likely to report. Perceived behavioural control (ease or difficulty of reporting), Descriptive Norms (belief that other pharmacists would report) and Attitudes towards Behaviour (expected benefits of reporting) showed good correlation with, and were statistically significant predictors of, intention to report the error [R = 0.568, R(2) = 0.323, adjusted R(2) = 0.293, P < 0.001]. This study suggests that efforts to improve medication safety incident reporting by hospital pharmacists should focus on their behavioural and control beliefs about the reporting process. This should include instilling greater confidence about the benefits of reporting and not harming professional relationships with doctors, greater clarity about what/not to report and a simpler reporting system. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the validity and reliability of German Diagnosis Related Group administrative data to measure indicators of patient safety in comparison to clinical records. A cross-sectional study was conducted using chart review (CR) as gold standard and screening of associated administrative data based on DRG coding. Three German somatic acute care hospitals for adults. A total of 3000 cases treated between May and December, 2010. Eight indicators were used to analyse the incidence of associated adverse events (AEs): pressure ulcers, catheter-related infections, respiratory failure, deep vein thromboses, hospital-acquired pneumonia, acute renal failure, acute myocardial infarction and wound infections. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and Cohen's Kappa with 95% confidence intervals. Screening of administrative data identified 171 AEs and 456 were identified by CR. A number of 135 identical events were identified by both methods. Sensitivities for the detection of AEs using administrative data ranged from 6 to 100%. Specificities ranged from 99 to 100%. PPV were 33 to 100% and reliabilities were 12 to 85%. Indicators based on German administrative data deviate widely from indicators based on clinical data. Therefore, hospitals should be cautious to use indicators based on administrative data for quality assurance. However, some might be useful for case findings and quality improvement. The precision of the evaluated indicators needs further development to detect AEs by the valid use of administrative data. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: Large gaps exist between clinical practice and recommended care of breast cancer. Evidence demonstrates that assessment of breast cancer care can help bridge these gaps. However, no valid indicators are currently available for measurement of breast cancer care in China. This study aimed to develop a set of quality indicators to measure and improve the quality of breast cancer care. A modified Delphi process was implemented, and each of the six selection criteria (scientific evidence, utility, interpretability, validity, preventability and data availability) for potential indicators was evaluated on a 5-point scale. A 16-member expert panel was assembled, including 10 medical oncologists, 5 surgical oncologists and 1 radiation oncologist. Quality indicators with mean ratings ≥4, coefficient of variation equal to or <25% and selectivity ≥81.25% in each of the six selection criteria were retained for the face-to-face round. Twenty-six indicators were retained from the rating round and five indicators were retrieved in the face-to-face round. A total of 31 indicators constituted the final set of quality indicators, and the number of indicators pertaining to structure, process, communication and cooperation, management of symptoms or treatment toxicity and outcome was 1, 24, 2, 2 and 2, respectively. Quality indicators for breast cancer care can be systematically developed and will be utilized as a quality measurement tool for breast cancer care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: Patient safety has become a major public health concern and a priority for multiple institutions. Assessment of the adverse events is a key element for measuring the quality of healthcare organizations. The aim of this study was to measure the validity of the clinical and administrative database (CADB) as a source of information for the detection of post-operative adverse events. The study design was cross-sectional. The study was carried out at the Hospital de Navarra (north of Spain). The sample consisted of 1602 episodes of surgical hospitalization from nine surgical departments. Two sources of information were used: data extracted from the complete clinical record (CR), the gold standard, vs. the CADB. Rate of adverse events, sensitivity, positive predictive value and κ index were analysed for 28 types of post-operative adverse event. Each index was considered acceptable if it had a value >0.6. The rate of adverse events using the CADB was 12.5 vs. 24% using CR within 30 days of surgery (P = 0.0001) and 13.9% using CR during a hospital stay (P > 0.05). The overall sensitivity of the CADB in the detection of adverse events was 0.18, and the positive predictive value was 0.34. Two adverse events (accounted for 6% of the total events detected) had moderate validity and the rest poor validity. Forty-two per cent of the adverse events took place after patient discharge. Although the use of CADB is appealing, the present study suggests that it is of very limited value in the detection of adverse events post-operatively. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · International Journal for Quality in Health Care