Journal of Health Psychology (J HEALTH PSYCHOL)

Publisher: SAGE Publications

Journal description

Journal of Health Psychology is an international forum for the best research in health psychology from around the world. It provides a platform for traditional empirical analyses as well as more qualitative andor critically oriented approaches. It also addresses the social contexts in which psychological and health processes are embedded.

Current impact factor: 1.88

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 1.78
Cited half-life 5.90
Immediacy index 0.22
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.56
Website Journal of Health Psychology website
Other titles Journal of health psychology (Online)
ISSN 1461-7277
OCLC 41385030
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

SAGE Publications

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors retain copyright
    • Pre-print on any website
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website, departmental website, institutional website or institutional repository
    • On other repositories including PubMed Central after 12 months embargo
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Post-print version with changes from referees comments can be used
    • "as published" final version with layout and copy-editing changes cannot be archived but can be used on secure institutional intranet
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Publisher last reviewed on 29/07/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study main purpose was the validation of both French and German versions of a Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire. The sample group comprised 5065 Swiss men from the "Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors." Multigroup Confirmatory factor analysis showed that a three-factor model fits the data well, which substantiates the generalizability of Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire factor structure, regardless of the language. The Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire demonstrated excellent homogeneity (α = 95) and split-half reliability (r = .96). The Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire was sensitive to community size and participants' financial situation, confirming that it also measures real social conditions. Finally, weak but frequent correlations between Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion Questionnaire and alcohol, cigarette, and cannabis dependence were measured.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · Journal of Health Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: This study focused on the contribution of the extended theory of planned behavior regarding intention to perform physical activity, adherence to physical activity, and its mediator role in the relationship between trust in the physician and adherence to physical activity, in a sample of 120 patients with type 2 diabetes. The results revealed that positive attitudes and perception of control predicted a stronger intention to do physical activity. The intention to do physical activity was the only predictor of adherence to physical activity. Planning mediated the relationship between trust in the physician and adherence. Implications for patients with type 2 diabetes are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Health Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: To assess satisfaction with care in acute spinal cord injury patients admitted to a specialized rehabilitation unit prior and after a tailored training in communication skills for the staff, the Picker Patient Experience-33 ((1) Content of the information, (2) Quality of the information, and (3) Quality of the relationship), the Spinal Cord Independence Measure-III, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered. The more troublesome dimension regarding patients' satisfaction was content of the information, with 88.37 and 91.43 percent (pre/post-intervention) reporting problems with information provided concerning their rights, and 51.15 and 58.72 percent (pre/post-intervention) with the information received at discharge. Overall, functionality (Spinal Cord Independence Measure-III) improved at discharge, but Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale pre/post-scores revealed to be high.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Health Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has drawn on theoretical models and clinical observations to develop propositions regarding the mechanisms of diet failure, with only one study examining it directly from the perspective of dieters themselves. Furthermore, research to date has failed to provide an empirically validated, multi-factorial model of diet failure, despite the issue being recognised as a complex and multifaceted one. This study extended on previous research by examining themes of diet failure from the perspective of dieters (n = 22) and health professionals in the field (n = 5).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Health Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Weight loss programs evidence considerable variability in treatment outcomes, and weight regain is common, signaling the need for the refinement of effective treatments. This study compared the recently developed Transforming Your Life program to the Diabetes Prevention Program, considered the "Gold Standard" in behavioral weight loss treatment. A total of 98 participants (Transforming Your Life = 51; Diabetes Prevention Program = 47) were randomized to the two weight loss interventions. The Transforming Your Life program and Diabetes Prevention Program produced comparable weight loss and maintenance outcomes. Individuals may benefit from engagement in the Transforming Your Life program, if they are searching for a somewhat novel approach to losing weight other than that offered by the Diabetes Prevention Program.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Health Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Type D personality is associated with health damaging behaviours amongst the general population. The present study assessed the relationship between Type D personality, physical activity and self-efficacy. One hundred and eighty nine participants completed measures of Type D personality, physical activity and self-efficacy. Type D individuals had significantly lower levels of self-efficacy and engaged in significantly less walking and total exercise compared to non-type D’s. Furthermore, self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between Type D and physical activity. Low levels of self-efficacy may be one mechanism to help explain why Type D individuals engage in more disease-promoting behaviours.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Health Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: The current study used the theory of planned behavior to examine rural college students' attitudes, normative beliefs, and perceived behavioral control regarding intent to register as organ donors. This effort is done in light of a need to increase intervention efforts among college students, particularly those in rural areas where these undertakings may need to be tailored in grassroots approaches. The study made use of perceived behavioral control as a moderator and found partial support for the model. Findings offer results that scholars, practitioners, and educators can utilize for interventions.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Health Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined psychological differences between individuals (1) with varying perceptions of their exercise adherence pattern and (2) who do and do not make exercise-related cognitive errors. A total of 364 adults completed an exercise pattern and cognitive errors questionnaire. Individuals perceiving themselves as consistent exercisers reported more adaptive social cognitive outcomes (e.g. higher self-regulatory efficacy) than those perceiving themselves as inconsistent. Individuals expressing stronger exercise-related cognitive errors exercised less and reported problematic cognitions (e.g. more struggle with exercise decisions). These results link inconsistent adherence perceptions to weaker social cognitions and exercise-related cognitive errors, a novel form of bias related to limited exercise engagement.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Health Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to explore young British men's understandings of prostate health and cancer of the prostate. A total of 16 White-British men between 31-50 years of age took part in interviews face-to-face or through computer-mediated communication. Thematic analysis broadly informed by grounded theory identified two key themes; 'limited knowledge about the prostate' and 'early detection & unpleasant procedures'. Accounts are discussed with reference to implications for improving men's understandings of prostate cancer, and likelihood of self-referral for prostate screening where necessary.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Health Psychology