ANZ Journal of Surgery

Publisher: Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, Wiley

Journal description

ANZ Journal of Surgery, established more than 70 years, is the leading surgical journal published in Australia, New Zealand and the South-East Asian region. The Journal is dedicated to the promotion of outstanding surgical practice and research of contemporary and international interest. ANZ Journal of Surgery publishes high-quality papers related to clinical practice and/or research in all fields of surgery and its related disciplines. A programme of continuing education for surgeons at all levels is also provided.

Current impact factor: 1.12

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.122
2013 Impact Factor 1.118
2012 Impact Factor 1.5
2011 Impact Factor 1.248
2010 Impact Factor 1.098
2009 Impact Factor 1.344
2008 Impact Factor 1.388
2007 Impact Factor 0.998
2006 Impact Factor 0.881
2005 Impact Factor 0.783
2004 Impact Factor 0.742
2003 Impact Factor 0.599
2002 Impact Factor 0.916

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.40
Cited half-life 7.30
Immediacy index 0.57
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.45
Website ANZ Journal of Surgery website
Other titles ANZ journal of surgery (Online), Australian and New Zealand journal of surgery
ISSN 1445-2197
OCLC 47259969
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • Non-Commercial
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 07/08/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: No abstract is available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract is available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The risk factors for new vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) after vertebroplasty are unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify potential risk factors. Methods: A systematic electronic literature search was performed using the following databases: PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library; the databases were searched from the earliest available records in 1966 to May 2015. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) or standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random- or fixed-effects models. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the studies, and Stata 11.0 was used to analyse the data. Results: The primary factors that were associated with new fractures after vertebroplasty were low bone mineral density (SMD -0.375; 95% CI -0.579 to -0.171), steroid usage (OR 2.632; 95% CI 1.399 to 4.950) and the presence of multiple treated vertebrae (OR 2.027; 95% CI 1.442 to 2.851). The data did not support that age, sex, body mass index, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug usage, vacuum cleft, thoracolumbar junction, cement volume, kyphosis correction, or intradiscal cement leakage could lead to infection after vertebroplasty. Conclusions: The present analysis demonstrated that low bone mineral density, the presence of multiple treated vertebrae and a history of steroid usage were associated with the new VCFs after vertebroplasty. Patients with these factors should be informed of the potential increased risk.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract is available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract is available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: To assess the outcome of retro-rectus repair of complex abdominal wall repair (CAWR) in a single institution in relation to the use of biologic and synthetic mesh. Method: A retrospective review was undertaken of complex abdominal wall repairs performed by a single surgical team, assessing the outcome of the retro-rectus repair and factors affecting the outcome. Results: Between 2007 and 2013, 57 (33 male) patients underwent CAWR retro-rectus repair. The material used was assessed as either synthetic or biologic (cross-linked porcine dermal collagen). The Ventral Hernia Working Group grades were similar between groups of patients having a repair with synthetic and biologic mesh. Median follow-up in the synthetic group was 18 months (1-80.5) and 18.4 months (0.5-70.7) in the biologic group. There was no statistical difference in seroma, wound infection or haematoma rates. No fistulae occurred in either group. Overall recurrence was 3.4% and there was no statistical difference between groups. Conclusion: The retro-rectus repair technique is associated with a low rate of recurrence and is now the technique of choice. The choice of material, biologic or synthetic, in Ventral Hernia Working Group grades 1-3 remains controversial.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Studies investigating the relationship between malnutrition and post-discharge mortality following acute hip fracture yield conflicting results. This study aimed to determine whether malnutrition independently predicted 12-month post-fracture mortality after adjusting for clinically relevant covariates. Methods: An ethics approved, prospective, consecutive audit was undertaken for all surgically treated hip fracture inpatients admitted to a dedicated orthogeriatric unit (November 2010-October 2011). The 12-month mortality data were obtained by a dual search of the mortality registry and Queensland Health database. Malnutrition was evaluated using the Subjective Global Assessment. Demographic (age, gender, admission residence) and clinical covariates included fracture type, time to surgery, anaesthesia type, type of surgery, post-surgery time to mobilize and post-operative complications (delirium, pulmonary and deep vein thrombosis, cardiac complications, infections). The Charlson Comorbidity Index was retrospectively applied. All diagnoses were confirmed by the treating orthogeriatrician. Results: A total of 322 of 346 patients were available for audit. Increased age (P = 0.004), admission from residential care (P < 0.001), Charlson Comorbidity Index (P = 0.007), malnutrition (P < 0.001), time to mobilize >48 h (P < 0.001), delirium (P = 0.003), pulmonary embolism (P = 0.029) and cardiovascular complication (P = 0.04) were associated with 12-month mortality. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that malnutrition (odds ratio (OR) 2.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-4.7, P = 0.007)), in addition to admission from residential care (OR 2.6 (95% CI 1.3-5.3, P = 0.005)) and pulmonary embolism (OR 11.0 (95% CI 1.5-78.7, P = 0.017)), independently predicted 12-month mortality. Conclusions: Findings substantiate malnutrition as an independent predictor of 12-month mortality in a representative sample of hip fracture inpatients. Effective strategies to identify and treat malnutrition in hip fracture should be prioritized.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract is available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Poor documentation of medical notes and plans not only adversely affects patient management but also has medico-legal implications. A standardized ward round checklist (adhesive proforma sticker, PFS) was introduced at our institution in 2013 to improve documentation by junior doctors. We aimed to examine the current pattern of PFS documentation (2 years after its introduction) and to identify which fields, if any, have been the most problematic to complete. Methods: Notes of all current general surgical inpatients admitted to Christchurch Public Hospital on or before the two study days were reviewed. All information written in the PFS, regardless of accuracy, authorship or completeness, was recorded. Documentation of the various PFS fields was classified as well documented (completed in >80% of PFS), inadequate (40-80%) or minimal (<40%). Results: Four hundred and seventy-nine PFS were reviewed. Most fields in the PFS were documented to an adequate level (i.e. >80%). Problematic fields identified were dietary plans, diagnosis, national health index number, estimated date of discharge and the patient's first name. Notes of patients on outlying ward contained significantly fewer PFS compared with home-ward patients' notes (0.71 PFS/day versus 1.21 PFS/day, respectively, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study has shown generally adequate patterns of medical note documentation in the General Surgery service. Certain fields remain challenging to document accurately. The proposed modified PFS was designed to help rectify this; electronic data record may be the step forward, however. It is hoped that other institutions in Australasia would benefit from our experience.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Assessing the role of laparoscopy in the management of intussusception. Methods: A retrospective review of children aged up to 17 years who had surgery for intussusception at this institution between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. Results: The cohort of 44 individuals (18 females) presented at a median age of 9 months (range 2.5 months-15.75 years) with intussusception; 36 patients had undergone a failed pneumatic reduction. Thirty-seven patients had an initial laparoscopic approach. Conversion was required in 13 individuals: inability to reduce a 'tight' intussusception in seven individuals, limited working space in four individuals, and inadequate tactile response in two individuals. Twenty-four patients (54%) had the laparoscopic approach completed. An open approach was chosen for seven individuals at a median age of 5 (range 4-11) months: three individuals had marked abdominal distension, two individuals had a pneumoperitoneum and two individuals presented with a large central mass. Together with the 13 conversions, a total of 20 patients (46%) underwent an open approach. The more distal the apex of the intussusception, the more likely open surgery was. Hospital stays for the subgroup of patients with successfully completed laparoscopic intervention (n = 24) were shorter than for the open surgery group (n = 20) with P = 0.0145, but the open procedure was used to manage the more challenging cases. The subgroup of seven infants undergoing direct open surgery were significantly younger than the remaining individuals (P = 0.0046). Conclusion: Laparoscopic intervention is meaningful in approximately 50% of children requiring a surgical reduction.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract is available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The significant increase in human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) over recent years has lead to a surge in research and an improved understanding of the disease. Most patients with HPV-associated OPC present with cystic nodal metastases with a small primary tumour, and respond well to all treatment modalities including primary surgery and primary chemoradiotherapy. Current research is evaluating treatment de-escalation to reduce long-term treatment-associated morbidities. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is particularly relevant as the transoral approach allows small primary tumours to be removed with lower morbidity than traditional surgical approaches. The current American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for oropharyngeal cancer does not appropriately stratify HPV-associated OPC; hence, alternative risk stratification and staging classifications are being proposed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Colorectal cancer is a common and often fatal malignancy. Currently, the modifications that alter disease outcome include early symptom recognition, population screening as well as improved surgical and adjuvant treatments. Preventative strategies have been limited with little evidence that lifestyle changes significantly alter risk. There is however a growing awareness of a potential role for chemoprevention in some patient groups. This study aimed to review the literature associated with chemoprevention in colorectal cancer. Methods: An electronic literature search of MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed on PubMed for studies detailing the use of chemoprevention agents in colon and rectal cancer. The search was limited to clinical trials on adult humans (>16 years of age) published in English since 1990. Results: The strongest evidence is for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs slowing polyp progression, notably Sulindac and aspirin in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, respectively. There is also increasing evidence that continuing use of low-dose aspirin reduces long-term incidence of colorectal cancers. Cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors also have a potential role but cardiac toxicity currently limits their use. Folic acid, statins, antioxidants, calcium and 5-aminosalicylic acid lack evidence to support their use at present. Conclusions: Currently, there is not enough evidence to support the implementation of a chemopreventative agent for general use. However, there appears to be a role for aspirin in selected subgroups.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Surgical audits provide constructive feedback to individual surgeons, hospitals and other healthcare sector professionals. Audits identify deficiencies in treatment processes, evaluate practice trends and detect practice gaps. The credibility and validity of the Queensland Audit of Surgical Mortality (QASM) relies on the accuracy of its data. Methods: To determine the validity of routine reporting of surgical information to QASM, surgical case forms were compared against medical records (considered the gold standard). Data were extracted by a trained medical research assistant. QASM forensically reviewed 896 of a total of 5636 deaths in 20 Queensland public hospitals between 2008 and 2013. Concordance between the surgical case form and the relevant medical record was determined for 27 objective items. Results: Overall concordance was 98.2%. The median concordance was 100% (interquartile range 87-100%). Cases with discordance were few and in these, most had only one discordant item. Discordances were mainly omissions. Conclusion: The QASM surgical case form is a reliable data collection tool that provides high-quality data. QASM objective data can be confidently regarded as accurate and therefore reliable for use in publications, reports and case studies.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Recurrent rectal cancer affects a significant group of patients with no current consensus on management. This study investigated patients' quality of life (QoL) in the 12 months after pelvic exenteration. Method: Prospective cohort study with clinical and QoL data collected at baseline and 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. QoL trajectories were modelled over 12 months from date of discharge using linear mixed models. Results: Of 117 patients, 93 underwent pelvic exenteration surgery, 24 did not. Thirty-day mortality was nil for both groups. For patients who had surgery, 15 (16%) died within 12 months of surgery compared with nine (38%) of the non-surgery group. Baseline QoL scores were highly variable. The non-exenteration patients' QoL gradually declined over 12 months while exenteration patients declined then recovered. Patients with high baseline QoL scores remained high, and those with low baseline QoL remained low. Baseline QoL score, gender and bony resection were significant predictors of QoL score at 12 months. Conclusion: Baseline QoL is a significant, independent predictor of patients' QoL after pelvic exenteration for recurrent rectal cancer.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: This study evaluates whether surgical experience influences technical competence using the Flinders sinus surgery simulator, a virtual environment designed to teach nasal endoscopic surgical skills. Methods: Ten experienced sinus surgeons (five consultants and five registrars) and 14 novices (seven resident medical officers and seven interns/medical students) completed three simulation tasks using haptic controllers. Task 1 required navigation of the sinuses and identification of six anatomical landmarks, Task 2 required removal of unhealthy tissue while preserving healthy tissue and Task 3 entailed backbiting within pre-set lines on the uncinate process and microdebriding tissue between the cuts. Results: Novices were compared with experts on a range of measures, using Mann-Whitney U-tests. Novices took longer on all tasks (Task 1: 278%, P < 0.005; Task 2: 112%, P < 0.005; Task 3: 72%, P < 0.005). In Task 1, novices' instruments travelled further than experts' (379%, P < 0.005), and provided greater maximum force (12%, P < 0.05). In Tasks 2 and 3 novices performed more cutting movements to remove the tissue (Task 2: 1500%, P < 0.005; Task 3: 72%, P < 0.005). Experts also completed more of Task 3 (66%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: The study demonstrated the Flinders sinus simulator's construct validity, differentiating between experts and novices with respect to procedure time, instrument distance travelled and number of cutting motions to complete the task.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · ANZ Journal of Surgery