Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy (Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc)

Publisher: European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy, Springer Verlag

Journal description

Official journal of the European Society of Sports Traumatology Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy (ESSKA) Few other areas of orthopedic surgery and traumatology have undergone such a dramatic evolution in the last 10 years as knee surgery arthroscopy and sports traumatology. The goal of this European journal is to publish papers about innovative knee surgery sports trauma surgery and arthroscopy. Each issue features a series of peer-reviewed articles that deal with diagnosis and management and with basic research. Each issue also contains at least one review article about an important clinical problem. Case presentations or short notes about technical innovations are also accepted for publication. The articles cover all aspects of knee surgery and all types of sports trauma; in addition epidemiology diagnosis treatment and prevention and all types of arthroscopy (not only the knee but also the shoulder elbow wrist hip ankle etc.) are addressed. Articles on new diagnostic techniques such as MRI and ultrasound and high-quality articles about the biomechanics of joints muscles and tendons are included. Although this is largely a clinical journal it is also open to basic research with clinical relevance. Because the journal is supported by a distinguished European Editorial Board assisted by an international Advisory Board you can be assured that the journal maintains the highest standards. Reports of animal experiments must state that the "Principles of laboratory animal care" (NIH publication No. 86-23 revised 1985) were followed as well as specific national laws (e.g. the current version of the German Law on the Protection of Animals) where applicable. The editor reserves the right to reject manuscripts that do not comply with the above-mentioned requirements. The author will be held responsible for false statements or for failure to fulfil the above-mentioned requirements.

Current impact factor: 3.05

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 3.053
2013 Impact Factor 2.837
2012 Impact Factor 2.676
2011 Impact Factor 2.209
2010 Impact Factor 1.857
2009 Impact Factor 1.674
2008 Impact Factor 1.696
2007 Impact Factor 1.626
2006 Impact Factor 1.216
2005 Impact Factor 1.018
2004 Impact Factor 1.182
2003 Impact Factor 1.083
2002 Impact Factor 1.051
2001 Impact Factor 1.262

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.00
Cited half-life 4.50
Immediacy index 0.64
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 0.84
Website Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy website
Other titles Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy (Online)
ISSN 1433-7347
OCLC 60637767
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

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    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
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    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tears of the superior labrum involving the biceps anchor are a common entity, especially in athletes, and may highly impair shoulder function. If conservative treatment fails, successful arthroscopic repair of symptomatic SLAP lesions has been described in the literature particularly for young athletes. However, the results in throwing athletes are less successful with a significant amount of patients who will not regain their pre-injury level of performance. The clinical results of SLAP repairs in middle-aged and older patients are mixed, with worse results and higher revision rates as compared to younger patients. In this population, tenotomy or tenodesis of the biceps tendon is a viable alternative to SLAP repairs in order to improve clinical outcomes. The present article introduces a treatment algorithm for SLAP lesions based upon the recent literature as well as the authors' clinical experience. The type of lesion, age of patient, concomitant lesions, and functional requirements, as well as sport activity level of the patient, need to be considered. Moreover, normal variations and degenerative changes in the SLAP complex have to be distinguished from "true" SLAP lesions in order to improve results and avoid overtreatment. The suggestion for a treatment algorithm includes: type I: conservative treatment or arthroscopic debridement, type II: SLAP repair or biceps tenotomy/tenodesis, type III: resection of the instable bucket-handle tear, type IV: SLAP repair (biceps tenotomy/tenodesis if >50 % of biceps tendon is affected), type V: Bankart repair and SLAP repair, type VI: resection of the flap and SLAP repair, and type VII: refixation of the anterosuperior labrum and SLAP repair.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Patellar maltracking due to incorrect component alignment is considered as a main reason for anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In contrast to coronal and axial component placement, the influence of sagittal component alignment on patellar kinematics has not been investigated so far. Methods: In ten lower cadaveric limbs, TKAs were implanted using a commercial computer navigation system. In six knees, the femoral component was aligned in 5° and in four knees in 0° of flexion, respectively. Patellar kinematics were registered by means of a computer navigation system using an additional patella tracking array and correlated with femoral and tibial sagittal component alignment. Results: Sagittal component alignment significantly altered patellar mediolateral shift (p < 0.05). In contrast, patellar epicondylar distance, rotation and tilt were not significantly influenced. Conclusions: Sagittal component alignment in TKA has a major impact on patellar kinematics and should therefore be considered while addressing tibiofemoral kinematics intraoperatively.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate the knee kinematics of the intact, MPFL-ruptured and MPFL-reconstructed knee and, moreover, to compare dynamic patellofemoral contact pressure of the gracilis tendon and the fascia lata as an alternative graft option for reconstruction of the MPFL. Methods: Eight paired human cadaveric knees were fixed in a custom-made fixation device. Patellofemoral contact pressure was assessed during a dynamic flexion movement at 15°-30°-45°-60°-75° and 90° using a pressure-sensitive film (Tekscan). The medial patellofemoral ligament was cut, and measurements were repeated. Finally, reconstruction of the MPFL was performed using the gracilis tendon (group I) or a fascia lata graft (group II). Tunnel localization was performed under fluoroscopic control. Grafts were fixed at 30° of flexion, and pressure measurements were repeated. Results: Incision of the medial patellofemoral ligament significantly reduced patellofemoral contact pressure at 15°, 30° and 45° of knee flexion compared to the intact knee (p < 0.05), whereas reconstruction of the MPFL using either gracilis tendon of the fascia lata was able to restore pressure distributions at 15° and 30° of knee flexion. However, in the hamstring group, reconstruction of the MPFL revealed a significantly reduced contact pressure at 45° of flexion (p = 0.038) compared to the intact knee. In the fascia lata group, a significant reduction in patellofemoral contact pressure was observed after MPFL reconstruction at 45°, 60°, 75° and 90° of knee flexion (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Anatomic reconstruction of the MPFL with either a gracilis or a fascia lata graft showed comparable patellofemoral pressure distributions which were closely restored compared to the native knee. Therefore, the fascia lata has shown to be a viable alternative to the gracilis tendon for reconstruction of the MPFL. However, anatomic reconstruction of the MPFL may lead to persistently altered patellofemoral contact pressure during knee flexion compared to the native knee independent of the tested graft.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: This cadaveric study compares the biomechanical properties of femoral graft fixation in ACL reconstruction of either quadriceps or hamstring tendon grafts with four different interference screws. The hypothesis was that quadriceps tendon grafts provide at least equal results concerning gap formation during cyclic loading and ultimate failure load compared to hamstring tendon grafts with four different interference screws. Methods: Eighty porcine femora underwent interference screw fixation of human tendon grafts for ACL reconstruction. Either quadriceps (Q) or hamstring (H) tendon grafts and four different bioabsorbable interference (Wolf (W), Storz (S), Mitek (M), Arthrex (A)) screws were used, resulting in 8 groups with 10 specimens per groups (WQ, WH, SQ, SH, MQ, MH, AQ, AH). Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning the constructs with 60 N for 30 s, then cyclic loading of 500 cycles between 60 and 250 N at 1 Hz in a servohydraulic testing machine, with measurement of elongation and stiffness including video measurements. After this, ultimate failure load and failure mode analysis were performed. Results: No statistically significant difference could be noted between the groups regarding gap formation during cyclic loading [Cycles 21-500 (mm): WQ 3.6 ± 0.8, WH 3.9 ± 1.4, SQ 3.6 ± 0.8, SH 3.3 ± 1.5, MQ 4.3 ± 0.8, MH 4.6 ± 1.0, AQ 4.8 ± 0.8, AH 4.3 ± 1.5, n.s.], stiffness during cyclic loading [Cycles 21-500 (N/mm): WQ 72.9 ± 16.9, WH 71.6 ± 20.7, SQ 69.5 ± 23.9, SH 77.4 ± 25.1, MQ 59.6 ± 11.2, MH 48.4 ± 15.4, AQ 48.8 ± 12.7, AH 51.9 ± 22.2, n.s.], and ultimate failure load [(N): WQ 474.4 ± 88.0, WH 579.3 ± 124.2, SQ 493.9 ± 105.2, SH 576.0 ± 90.4, MQ 478.6 ± 59.0, MH 543.9 ± 119.7, AQ 480.2 ± 93.8, AH 497.8 ± 74.2, n.s.]. Conclusions: Quadriceps tendon grafts yield comparable biomechanical results for femoral interference screw fixation in ACL reconstruction compared to hamstring tendon grafts. From a clinical perspective, quadriceps tendon grafts should therefore be considered as a good option in ACL reconstruction in the future.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose End-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) results in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery. The decision to perform TKA is not well defined, resulting in variation of indications among orthopaedic surgeons. Non-operative treatment measures are often not extensively used. Aim of this study was to investigate factors influencing the decision to perform TKA by Dutch orthopaedic surgeons. Methods Three case vignettes, each case divided into two versions, being identical except for information on age (younger and older age), pain (mild and severe pain) or radiological OA (low and high grade) were developed. A questionnaire including these three case vignettes was sent to 599 Dutch orthopaedic surgeons, who were randomised to either one of the two versions. The orthopaedic surgeons were asked whether TKA would be the next step in treatment. Furthermore, from a list of patient factors they were asked how strong these factors would influence the decision to perform TKA. Results 54 % of the orthopaedic surgeons completed the questionnaire (n = 326). Orthopaedic surgeons indicated to perform TKA significantly more often at higher age (73.3 vs. 45.5 %, p < 0.001). In the presence of mild pain, orthopaedic surgeons were slightly more reluctant to perform a TKA compared to severe pain (57.0 vs. 64.0 %, n.s.). Mild radiological OA made surgeons more reluctant to perform TKA compared to severe OA (9.7 vs. 96.9 %, p < 0.001). Conclusion Old age and severe radiological OA are variables which are considered to be important in the decision to perform a TKA. Pain symptoms of moderate or severe pain are unequivocal when considering a TKA. Level of evidence Economic/decision analysis, Level III.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The presented study was performed to evaluate the midterm clinical and radiological results and complication rates of the first 40 patients with an ankle fusion through a posterior arthroscopic approach. Methods Forty consecutive patients with end-stage post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis were treated with posterior arthroscopic ankle fusion. All patients were assessed clinically as well as radiologically with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and Foot Function Index (FFI) were used to assess clinical improvement. Results Clinical fusion was achieved in 40 patients within 3 months (100 %), and radiological fusion was achieved in 40 patients at 12 months. Two screw mal-placements occurred. Both complications were solved following revision surgery. A significant improvement was noted for both the FAAM [median 38 (range 17–56) to 63 (range 9–84)] and FFI scores [median 66 (range 31–89) to 32 (range 11–98)] for all 40 patients. Conclusion The posterior arthroscopic ankle fusion is an effective and safe treatment option for end-stage post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis at midterm follow-up. Level of evidence Prospective cohort study, Level IV.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose To utilize the ‘Forgotten Joint’ Score (FJS), a 12-item questionnaire analysing the ability to forget the joint, for comparing preoperative status in osteoarthritic patients scheduled for total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Higher scores represent a better result with a maximum of 100. The hypothesis of this study was that a preoperative difference in favour of hip arthritis could eventually explain why THA is cited more often as a forgotten joint than TKA. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in 150 patients with either tricompartmental knee (n = 75) or hip osteoarthritis (n = 75). Patients completed FJS-12 scores preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. Results A similar preoperative FJS-12 was observed for hip (22 (15)) and knee osteoarthritis (24 (17)) (n.s.). The postoperative FJS-12 score was significantly higher for THA (80 (24)) than for TKA (70 (27)) (p < 0.05). High reliability after 6 weeks was observed for the preoperative FJS-12 test–retest reliability (ICC = 0.87) in TKA. A preoperative floor effect of 15 % in THA and 0 % in TKA was found as well as a postoperative ceiling effect of 33 % in THA and 9 % in TKA. Conclusions The clinical relevance of utilizing the FJS-12 as an instrument to evaluate outcome is strongly proposed for knee arthroplasty. In general, one is not aware of a healthy joint during the ADL, and it can therefore be regarded as ‘forgotten’. The preoperative FJS-12 Score is a powerful tool to provide patients with clearer insights into their positive evolution after surgery. The use of the FJS-12 in THA is a topic for further research, as this study found that floor and ceiling effects limit its usefulness in studies evaluating clinical outcome in this area. Level of evidence II.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Tubercular septic arthritis after shoulder arthroscopy has not been reported in the English literature to our knowledge. A case of Tubercular septic arthritis of the shoulder following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is presented. The sinus and the wound healed well, and laboratory parameters returned to normal, which suggests that the infection was well controlled with the treatment follow-up of 1 year. But the functional score was poor due to repeated surgeries; long-standing infection and the arthritic changes developed. Tubercular infection can occur after arthroscopic shoulder surgery especially in healthcare workers in zones endemic for Tuberculosis. Level of evidence V.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Recent studies have suggested radial displacement of the medial meniscus as a cause of varus knee osteoarthritis (OA). Two anatomical studies reported that such displacement may be associated with anterior insertion of the medial meniscus anterior horn. It was aimed to evaluate the location and area of this insertion in patients with advanced knee OA. Methods Medial meniscus anterior horn insertions were classified into four types, as described in a previously reported classification during 225 total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in 184 patients. The incidence rates of insertion type were compared with previously reported rates in nearly normal or non-arthritic knees. The insertion surface area was also measured during 158 TKAs. Results Of the 225 knees, 82 (36.4 %), 93 (41.3 %), 35 (15.6 %), and 15 (6.7 %) were classified as I, II, III, and IV, respectively. An anteriorly inserted anterior horn was not more frequent in advanced varus OA knees than in previously reported nearly normal or non-arthritic knees. The insertion surface areas were 57.5 ± 18.9, 56.1 ± 16.0, and 56.4 ± 14.4 mm2 for types I, II, and III, respectively; these areas did not differ significantly. Conclusion Since the incidence of an anteriorly inserted medial meniscus anterior horn was not higher in advanced varus OA knees than in normal or non-arthritic knees, an anteriorly inserted anterior horn may have little or no effect on the aetiology of varus OA knees. This study provides some information for clarifying the aetiology of knee OA. Level of evidence IV.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose To analyse the non-response group in the Swedish Knee Ligament Register (SKLR). Methods All 3588 patients in the SKLR who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament surgery in 2010 were included. Respondents (n = 1865) and non-respondents (n = 1723) at the 2-year follow-up survey were assessed for potential differences in demographics and baseline data. KOOS/EQ5D questionnaires were sent to non-respondents together with a non-response survey asking questions about reasons for dropout. Results Respondents had a significantly higher mean age (27.8 years, range 9–64) than non-respondents (25.9 years, range 12–65) (p < 0.001). Women had a higher rate of response 927 (62.8 %) than men 938 (44.4 %) even after correction for age (p < 0.001). Alpine/telemark skiing was the only activity at time of injury that showed higher rate of respondents 280 (62.5 %) compared to non-respondents 168 (37.5 %) (p < 0.001). No differences in EQ5D at 2-year follow-up were found between the groups. The change in KOOS from 0 to 2 years showed difference in the subscale pain with 9.4 in the response group compared to 6.3 in the late-response group (p < 0.05) and the subscale quality of life with a difference of 26.1 and 22.6, respectively (p < 0.05). The non-response questionnaire showed shortcomings in patient information regarding the importance of the SKLR. Conclusion The register is valid concerning baseline surgical data, but higher age, female gender and perhaps higher socioeconomic status improve the response rates. KOOS showed small differences of questionable clinical significance. The SKLR patient information could be improved. Level of evidence Retrospective comparative study, Level III.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Anterior shoulder dislocation is a common injury, but the optimal management of dislocation remains controversial. We hypothesized that reducing the shoulder in externally rotated position would aid the reduction in capsulolabral lesions. Thus, in this study, contact pressure between the capsulolabral lesion and the glenoid in free ALPSA and Bankart lesions was measured using a cadaver model. Methods In 10 specimens, the humerus was externally rotated by abduction on the coronal plane to measure the contact pressure between the capsulolabral complex and glenoid in free ALPSA and Bankart lesions using a Tekscan pressure system. Stability of the joint was confirmed using the Vicon motion analysis system. Results In the normal shoulder joint, the peak pressure between the subscapularis muscle and the anterior capsule according to the location of the glenohumeral joint decreased to 83.4 ± 21.2 kPa in the 0° abduction and −30° external rotation positions and showed a 300.7 ± 42.9 kPa peak value in the 60° abduction and 60° external rotation positions. In both free ALPSA and Bankart lesions, the lowest pressure between the labral lesion and the glenoid was measured at 0° abduction and −30° external rotation, and the highest pressure was recorded at 60° external rotation and 60° abduction. Conclusion The contact pressure between the capsulolabral complex and the glenoid significantly increased when the abduction and external rotation angles were increased. Based on our results, the conservative management in free ALPSA lesions would respond better than Bankart lesions. IRB or ethical committee approval YWMR-12-0-038.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical potential of a new measurement technique for open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) based on the medial cortex opening (MCO) associated with the Miniaci preoperative planning technique. Methods A retrospective review of 97 cases of valgus-producing HTO that were performed between 2008 and 2013, using the intra-operative fluoroscopic mechanical axis technique, was carried out. The Miniaci-based measurement technique was then used as a theoretical point of comparison with the intent to compare the disparity between postoperative and ideal lower extremity (LE) mechanical axis with the measured disparity between postoperative and Miniaci-based planned MCO. Results A significant correlation was observed for the comparison of the disparity between postoperative and Miniaci-based planned MCO and the disparity between postoperative and ideal LE mechanical axis (0.53, P = 0.001). This would suggest that the MCO associated with the Miniaci preoperative planning technique would have resulted in a better alignment had it been the chosen method to guide the amount of osteotomy opening. No significant correlation was observed between perioperative and postoperative LE mechanical axis (n.s.), the variable on which the current technique is based, confirming the poor reliability of the fluoroscopic mechanical axis technique. Conclusions This study suggests a more accurate and precise technique of realizing the appropriate angular correction when performing a HTO, which could lead to better clinical outcomes. Level of evidence III.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of this prospective randomized clinical study was to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes, including tibial tunnel widening and the progression of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction using a hamstring autograft or a tibialis allograft. In addition, we compared the graft tear and synovial coverage of grafts in patients that underwent the second-look arthroscopy. Methods Among 184 patients with an ACL injury who underwent ACL reconstruction, 68 patients of autograft group and 64 patients of tibialis allograft group were included for this study after minimum of 2-year follow-up. The Lachman and pivot-shift tests, Tegner activity score, Lysholm knee score, and IKDC score were compared between the two groups. The quadriceps and hamstring isokinetic strengths using dynamometer were also compared. Degree of OA was determined using the Kellgren–Lawrence grading system on the weight-bearing radiographs. In total, 51 patients (26 patients in autograft group and 25 in the tibialis allograft group) underwent the second-look arthroscopy, in which we compared the apparent tear of graft and synovial coverage of grafts. Results At the final follow-up, there were no statistical significances in the two groups in Lachman and pivot-shift tests (n.s.). The Tegner activity, Lysholm knee score, and IKDC scores were similar in the two groups. Moreover, no significant differences were observed in the muscle power (n.s.). Some patients showed the progression of OA (five in autograft and four in allograft groups) without intergroup difference (n.s.). Regarding the findings of second-look arthroscopy, although there was no significant difference in graft tear, synovial coverage was better in autograft group than in allograft group. Conclusion Even though hamstring autografts and tibialis allografts provided good functional outcomes without significant differences, the second-look arthroscopy revealed that hamstring autografts produced better synovial coverage than tibialis allograft. Level of evidence I.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The aim was to investigate the interplay between patient characteristics and (1) length of hospital stay and (2) one-year patient-reported outcome following total knee and hip arthroplasty. Methods Event (survival) analysis and structural equation modelling were performed for 1001 patients undergoing knee (n = 566) and hip (n = 435) arthroplasty in a single institution. Results Age, body mass index and co-morbidities were independent predictors of length of stay in both event analysis and structural equation modelling. These patient characteristics and type of arthroplasty had both small direct and indirect effects on patient-reported outcome measures at one year. Length of stay had a small effect (<2 %) in SF-36 scores at one year. Conclusion Predictors that influence length of stay also impact on one-year post-operative outcome and therefore should be taken into account during patient selection and discharge planning. Level of evidence Retrospective cohort study, Level III.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate the safety for neurovascular structures and accuracy for tunnel placement of the posterolateral portal tibial tunnel drilling technique in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. Methods: Fifteen fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees were used. The tibial tunnel for the PCL was created using a flexible reamer from the posterolateral portal. Then, the flexible pin was left in place, and the distance from the posterolateral portal, the flexible pin, and the tibial tunnel to the peroneal nerve and popliteal artery was measured. Additionally, the distance between the tibial tunnel and several landmarks related to the PCL footprint was measured, along with the distance from the exit point of the flexible pin to the superficial medial collateral ligament and gracilis tendon. Results: The peroneal nerve and the popliteal neurovascular bundle were not damaged in any of the specimens. The median (range) distance in mm from the peroneal nerve and popliteal artery to the posterolateral portal and flexible pin was: 52 (40-80) and 50 (40-61), and 35 (26-51) and 22 (16-32), respectively. The median (range) distance from the tibial tunnel to the popliteal artery was 21 mm (15-38). The tibial tunnel was located at a median (range) distance in mm of 3 (2-6), 6 (3-12), 5 (2-7), 4 (1-8), 9 (3-10), 10 (4-19), and 19 (6-24) to the champagne-glass drop-off, lateral cartilage point, shiny white fibre point, medial groove, medial meniscus posterior root, lateral meniscus posterior root, and posterior aspect of the anterior cruciate ligament, respectively. Conclusions: The posterolateral portal tibial tunnel technique is safe relative to neurovascular structures and creates an anatomically appropriate tibial tunnel location. The clinical relevance of study is that this technique may be safely and accurately used in PCL reconstruction to decrease the risk of neurovascular damage (avoid use of a posteriorly directed pin), avoid the use of intraoperative fluoroscopy, and avoid the sharp turn during graft passage.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy