European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling (Eur J Psychother Counsell Health)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

The European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling & Health is a peer reviewed publication which aims to stimulate and inform debate and provide linkages throughout Europe within the expanding field of psychotherapy and counselling as a means to health. The journal raises important questions in terms of European practice, theory and research for psychotherapy and counselling practitioners, related professions, students and academics. The focus of the journal includes the following areas: the contributions from and debates between different European theoretical approaches to psychotherapy, counselling and health, and their respective traditions of practice and research the implications of individual and group psychotherapy and counselling for European health professionals in public, private and voluntary settings the managerial and training/education issues that arise from the increasing provision of psychotherapy and counselling in European health care settings the interaction between the psychological and the physical and the status of these categories. Dealing with key current, practical and theoretical issues, the journal is essential reading for informed practitioners across disciplines and geographic boundaries, who need a greater understanding of developments in psychotherapy and counselling in Europe. Key coverage: Clinical comment on practice - moving important issues to the forefront of discussion Broad ranging theoretical perspectives - providing contrasting, informed debate on a wide range of subjects Current research developments - ensuring that new information is brought to attention quickly and clearly International topics - bringing together European research interests New publications - highlighting and reviewing books of particular importance in this fast expanding field.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling & Health website
Other titles European journal of psychotherapy, counselling, and health (Online)
ISSN 1364-2537
OCLC 45689948
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling
  • Mark Pearson · Caroline Bulsara

    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling
  • Article: Dark clouds
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    ABSTRACT: This essay is in part a response to a cluster of papers from the conference in Norway. Utilising these as a springboard to expand certain ideas, some latent, some more manifest in the papers, regarding the history and the terrain concerning the mental health issues in our culture. Fundamentally, this proposes that there is an unrelenting tension between two polarities: one reactionary and authoritarian, fixated on a concern with outcomes, propped up by closed systems of thought, managerial, habitually linked to adaptation and conformity; the other more romantically seen as revolutionary, unhandcuffing madness from mental illness, facilitating more expansive, freewheeling possibilities within all our lives. Much of this pays tribute to some of the major figures in the history of ‘anti-psychiatry’ (Basaglia, Cooper and Laing), with the costs involved, and goes on to trace out the genesis and consequences of the two predominant ‘clouds’ permeating our world, the paranoid and the digital … all converging on a naturalisation of our culture of surveillance, and an insistence on control. Otherwise known as a culture of fear.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: Hegemonic mental health service approaches stress the need for ‘accurate’ diagnosis in order to understand what the correct ‘treatment’ should be. I review the evidence on how far diagnosis in psychiatry has helped advance scientific knowledge and clinical practice and conclude that it hasn’t. I then examine how National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines in relation to children’s behaviour problems reflects the lack of progress that results from adopting a diagnostic approach. Taking mental health practice beyond reliance on narrow non-evidence-based diagnostic algorithms can be developed by adopting existing projects such as the Partners for Change Outcome Management Systems project.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: In this commentary, Michael Rustin reviews the articles in the symposium, outlining their main aims and arguments. He goes on to provide some critical reflections, asking questions about the key concept of the ‘therapeutic state’. He notes that little attention is given to psychoanalytic or other psychological theories of the mind, as distinct from the biological models which are the main object of criticism in the symposium. He argues that just as it is justifiable and useful to take account of theories of the mind in considering issues of mental health and therapy, so it is desirable also to take account of the structures of society which have responsibility for generating conditions of mental well- or ill-being, and to reflect on how these may be changed. The commentary argues that the counter-cultural and somewhat ‘post-modern’ critical approach which informs the symposium can only form part of a sufficient response to the problems which the symposium identifies.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: This paper will present some of the relational contexts and considerations of a female therapist’s role within an island community group for women who have shared experiences of abuse and injustice; her relationship to the group, to her systemic and narrative practices; and to the research that has ensued. Exploring the changing relational contexts as the group moves from a facilitator led to a peer support group; and the associated language shifts from a binary discourse of ‘other than’ to a collective definition of ‘sisterhood’ is part of the story, which also includes the important themes of community engagement, social action and the complexities of insider/practice-based research.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past 170 years, American psychiatry has progressively asserted its authority over a larger segment of the American population. From the mid-1800s to the end of World War II, psychiatry had authority over the asylum population, which markedly increased in the first half of the twentieth century due to the influence of eugenics, an ideology that argued the ‘mentally ill’ had to be segregated from society. After the war, American psychiatry adopted Freudian conceptions of mental disorders, which enabled it to begin treating people in the community who were ‘neurotic’ in some way, which dramatically expanded its influence in society. Then, in the 1970s, when many in American society were questioning psychiatry’s legitimacy as a branch of medicine, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) responded by adopting a disease model for diagnosing mental disorders, which it set forth in the third edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. There were no scientific discoveries that led to this new model, but soon the APA was informing the American public that mental disorders were diseases of the brain, and that psychiatric drugs helped fix those diseases, ‘like insulin for diabetes.’ The APA, in concert with pharmaceutical companies, has successfully exported this belief system to much of the developed world. In order to break free of this ‘therapeutic state,’ the public needs to understand the history of how it came to be, and see the social injury it has caused.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: Family Care Foundation was created in 1987 as a reaction towards a system which far too often seems to forget it is real people involved, both those called clients and professional helpers. It is as if knowledge from ordinary life often is put aside when entering a professional context. Manuals and specific methods have increased steadily over the years as also psychiatric diagnosis and prescription of pharmaceuticals. It is argued here that regardless of whether we are called therapists, family homes or clients, we are affected by each other and the situations we find ourselves in. We bear with us our personal history while we are also part of a larger context. Those of us working as psychotherapists have a potential to contribute with knowledge regarding human beings and human life conditions. This paper describes and discusses some central themes found in practice and through research. In psychotherapy, as in life, there are moments and situations that can’t be proven or verbally explained, which perhaps can’t be completely understood. Our shared work in the Extended Therapy Room entails, as in life, moments of deepest fear as well as moments of wonderful joy.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the results of a systematic analysis, organised by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, of private psychotherapy training in Italy. Since 1989, training in psychotherapy in Italy has been governed by a national law which recognises both public and private institutions. While the public system usually comprises approximately 150 students, the private system has grown significantly over time, registering thousands of students in hundreds of schools (for example, 19,123 students in 212 schools in 2011). Systematic analysis variables included geographical distribution, theoretical approaches, training methods, student and teacher characteristics, student’s personal psychotherapy, supervision and apprenticeships. Data were obtained from 92% of the schools. The primary issues discussed in this paper are as follows: the uneven geographical distribution of the schools; the disorderly amalgamation of traditional scientific paradigms; programmes which concentrate on theory and fail to meet international guidelines. One key issue is the excess supply with regard to demand, meaning that recently graduated psychotherapists (especially women) risk underemployment and financial hardship. Student enrolment is also increasingly problematic. This is the first paper to present an in-depth analysis of one European country’s situation in this field. The authors believe it will foster comparison and discussion internationally.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling