AIDS Care (AIDS Care)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

A forum for publishing research and reports from the many complementary disciplines involved in the HIV/AIDS field, AIDS Care is one of only a small number of journals which successfully deals with the psychological and social aspects of AIDS. Peer-reviewed research originates from diverse disciplines including psychology, sociology, epidemiology, social work, anthropology, ethics, nursing, education, health education, law, administration and counselling. AIDS and HIV infection, the planning of services, prevention and the fear of AIDS affects many echelons of society ranging from individuals, couples and families through to institutions and communities. A particular aim is to publish work emanating from many centres and in so doing address the global impact of AIDS.

Current impact factor: 1.60

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 1.99
Cited half-life 5.80
Immediacy index 0.31
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.65
Website AIDS Care website
Other titles AIDS care (Online), Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome care
ISSN 1360-0451
OCLC 37914882
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
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    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the extent of unstructured HIV treatment interruptions (TIs) and investigate the effects of socioeconomic, socio-demographic, HIV treatment-related and clinical factors on the magnitude and rate of the same among adult patients at a Kenyan regional referral center. Four hundred and twenty-one adult patients actively receiving antiretroviral therapy at Nyeri County Referral Hospital since 2003 were randomly selected to complete a health survey questionnaire. Electronic records were used to obtain their HIV treatment utilization history. The marginal effects of selected determinants on prevalence and rate of TI were assessed by fitting multiple Poisson log-linear regression models. In total, 392 patients participated in the study. HIV TI was prevalent with 64.5% having had at least one TI of 3 months or more during treatment. The risk of TI was significantly higher in those longer on treatment (prevalence ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-1.28). Greater risk of TI was also associated with lower income (prevalence rate ratio [PRR] = 0.9, 95% CI 0.83-1.00), low medication adherence (PRR = 0.3, 95% CI 0.13-0.72), inconsistent treatment engagement (PRR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.19-0.75) and, contrarily, fewer adverse drug reactions (PRR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.90-0.97). Unstructured HIV TIs appear to be fairly common at the study site. The results suggest that efforts to minimize HIV TI could benefit from treatment-continuity monitoring strategies that target the high-risk sub-samples identified.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: Mental health problems are prevalent among drug users. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is an evidence-based effective treatment for drug addiction; however, there are few studies investigating depression, suicidal ideation, and their related factors among MMT users. In this cross-sectional study, 648 MMT users were recruited from six MMT clinics in Guangzhou, China. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews by trained interviewers. Of all participants, 270 (42.7%) exhibited probable depression (Depression Subscale of the Chinese short version of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-D), score ≥ 10) and 99 (15.3%) reported having suicidal ideation in the last six months. After adjusting for significant socio-demographic characteristics, all studied variables, including drug use history, social support, family support for MMT use, and satisfaction toward MMT services were significantly associated with both probable depression and suicidal ideation in the last six months. Furthermore, depression fully mediated the associations between drug use history, satisfaction toward MMT services, and suicidal ideation. In the final multivariate models, probable depression was associated with social support (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.83-0.93) and satisfaction toward MMT services provided by doctors (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.40-0.86), while for suicidal ideation, social support (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.78-0.92) and probable depression (OR = 5.94, 95% CI = 3.39-10.42) were significant. The findings suggest that there are unmet mental health needs among MMT users. For countries with limited resources of psychological services, mental health care toward MMT users should be implanted into current health care settings and incorporate components such as social support, family's understanding of MMT, and service satisfaction.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are recognized as one of the conditions in which HIV testing is most clearly indicated. We analyse whether people diagnosed with an STI are being tested for HIV according to the experience of participants in an outreach rapid testing programme in Spain. Between 2008 and 2010, 6293 individuals underwent rapid testing and completed a self-administered questionnaire. We calculated the percentage of individuals that were diagnosed with an STI in the last 5 years and identified the setting where the last episode occurred. We then determined the percentage not receiving an HIV test after the last STI diagnosis and estimated the associated factors. Overall, 17.3% (N = 959) of participants reported an STI diagnosis in the last 5 years, of which 81.5% occurred in general medical settings. Sixty-one percent reported not undergoing HIV testing after their last STI diagnosis, 2.2% of whom reported they had refused the test. Not receiving an HIV test after the last STI diagnosis was independently associated with not being a man who has sex with men (MSM), having had fewer sexual partners, being diagnosed in general medical settings and having received a diagnosis other than syphilis. An unacceptably large percentage of people diagnosed with STI are not being tested for HIV because healthcare providers frequently fail to offer the test. Offering routine HIV testing at general medical settings, regardless of the type of STI diagnosed and population group, should be a high priority and is probably a more efficient strategy than universal screening in general healthcare settings.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: AIDS-related mortality among HIV-positive adolescents has risen by 50% despite the scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART maladherence likely plays a role in the increase of AIDS-related deaths among adolescents and has shown to be associated with psychosocial and mental health difficulties. Addressing the specific mental health needs of HIV-positive adolescents is critical to ending the HIV epidemic. This cross-sectional study prospectively enrolled HIV-positive adolescents (12-24 years) in Moshi, Tanzania. A structured questionnaire was administered that included questions about home, school, adherence, and measures of stigma (Berger Stigma Scale) and mental health. Mental health measures included depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), emotional/behavioral difficulties (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and traumatic experiences/post-traumatic stress symptoms (The University of California Los Angeles-post-traumatic stress disorder-Reaction Index). Mental health difficulties were prevalent among HIV-positive adolescents and were associated with incomplete adherence and stigma. Resources are needed to reduce HIV stigma and address mental health among HIV-positive adolescents in low-resource settings. This will improve not only mental health, but may also improve ART adherence and virologic suppression, improving overall health of the individual and reducing the risk of HIV transmission to others.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: Current HIV prevention interventions for female sex workers (FSWs) have tended to target the cognitive factors in changing their behaviors, yet little attention has been paid to the psychological factors that influence the behavior of women in sex work. This review aimed to explore the associations between the psychological health of FSWs and HIV risk. A total of eight studies published in English before July 2013 were identified and reviewed. FSWs had reported psychological issues, including depression, suicidal thoughts as well as lower quality of life, and the pooled prevalence of probable depression was as high as 62.4%. The majority of studies showed that higher scores in psychological health problems were associated with increased HIV risk behavior, in particular inconsistent condom use, or sexually transmitted infections. Among the five studies which measured symptoms of depression, four documented that higher depression scores were significantly associated with inconsistent condom use among FSWs with their clients and/or partners. Meta-analysis using a fixed-effects model was performed to examine the association between depression and inconsistent condom use and found that higher scores in depression were significantly associated with inconsistent condom use (odds ratio = 2.57, p < .001). This review contends that future HIV preventive interventions should take psychological health of FSWs into consideration.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: Social cohesion and social participation are social factors that may help reduce HIV risks and optimize health-seeking behaviors. We examined the association between these factors and HIV testing in the last 12 months among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Swaziland using a cross-sectional survey conducted with 326 men, 18 years of age or older reporting having sex with another man in the last 12 months. Social capital analyses included measures of social cohesion and social participation. The social cohesion measurement scale was created through exploratory factor analysis using polychoric correlations to determine unidimensionality and Cronbach's Alpha to assess internal consistency. The measurement scale was divided at the 25th and 75th percentiles using "high," "medium" and "low" levels of social cohesion for between-group comparisons. The social participation index included four questions regarding participation, resulting in a participation index ranging from 0 to 4. In the final multivariate logistic regression model, an increase in the level of social participation was found to be significantly associated with HIV testing in the last 12 months, adjusting for age, income, reporting a casual partner, family exclusion and rejection by other MSM due to sexual orientation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-1.7, p < .01). MSM with high social cohesion had almost twice the odds of HIV testing in the last 12 months (aOR: 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.3, p < .05) as MSM with medium social cohesion, though the overall social cohesion variable was not found to be significant using a Wald test in either the adjusted or unadjusted logistic regression models. These data suggest that building solidarity and trust within and between groups may be a strategy to improve uptake of HIV testing.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: Outcomes following healthcare transition (HCT) from pediatric to adult HIV care are not well described. We sought to describe clinical outcomes following HCT within our institution among young adults with behavioral-acquired (N = 31) and perinatally-acquired (N = 19) HIV. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among HIV-infected adults who attempted transition from pediatric to adult HIV care within our institution. The primary end point was retention in care, defined as the completion of at least two visits over 12 months following linkage to adult care. Additional end points include time to linkage to adult care, and changes in CD4 + T cell count and HIV RNA across time. Outcomes were compared between perinatal and behavioral HIV cohorts. Binary data were analyzed using the Fisher exact test and continuous data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. Forty-three (86%) of 50 patients were successfully linked to adult care. The median time to linkage was 98 days. Fifty percent of patients achieved full retention in care at 12 months post-linkage. Though those with behavioral-acquired HIV attempted transfer at an older age, the groups did not differ in rates of linkage and retention in adult care. CD4 + T cell counts and rates of viral suppression did not differ between pre- and post-HCT periods. Despite high rates of successful linkage to adult care in our study population, rates of retention in adult HIV care following HCT were low. These results imply that challenges remain in the adult HIV care setting toward improving the HCT process.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: It has become popular for men who have sex with men (MSM) to use mobile-phone geosocial networking applications (mobile apps) to find sex partners. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in Taiwan to compare the sexual and substance-use behaviors of MSM seeking sex partners through the internet and mobile apps. Of the 1060 participants, 65.8% used the internet via computer and 37.7% used a mobile app to find sexual partners, while 30.3% used recreational drugs or alcohol in the previous 6 months. MSM who exclusively used mobile apps to seek sex partners were significantly more likely than MSM seeking sex via computer to be older, to have used recreational drugs or alcohol, and to have sex with HIV-positive partners. Additionally, using mobile apps to seek sex partners was significantly associated with having sex with online partners through either mobile apps or computer-based internet use (adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 7.12 [3.87-13.11]), self-reporting as HIV-positive (AOR, 2.24 [1.12-4.12]), using recreational drugs (AOR, 1.67 [1.21-2.32]), having disclosed HIV status to sexual partners (AOR, 1.44 [1.03-2.02]), and having sex with HIV-positive partners (AOR, 1.81 [1.06-3.10]). In conclusion, the mobile apps may serve as a feasible platform for HIV-positive MSM to find other HIV-positive partners.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: Early HIV detection and treatment decreases morbidity and mortality and reduces high-risk behaviors. Many Emergency Departments (EDs) have HIV screening programs as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recent federal legislation includes incentives for electronic health record (EHR) adoption. Our objective was to analyze the impact of conversion to EHR on a mature ED-based HIV screening program. A retrospective pre- and post-EHR implementation cohort study was conducted in a large urban, academic ED. Medical records were reviewed for HIV screening rates from August 2008 through October 2013. On 1 November 2010, a comprehensive EHR system was implemented throughout the hospital. Before EHR implementation, labs were requested by providers by paper orders with HIV-1/2 automatically pre-selected on every form. This universal ordering protocol was not duplicated in the new EHR; rather it required a provider to manually enter the order. Using a chi-squared test, we compared HIV testing in the 6 months before and after EHR implementation; 55,054 patients presented before, and 50,576 after EHR implementation. Age, sex, race, acuity of presenting condition, and HIV seropositivity rates were similar pre- and post-EHR, and there were no major patient or provider changes during this period. Average HIV testing rate was 37.7% of all ED patients pre-, and 22.3% post-EHR, a 41% decline (p < 0.0001), leading to 167 missed new diagnoses after EHR. The rate of HIV screening in the ED decreased after EHR implementation, and could have been improved with more thoughtful inclusion of existing human processes in its design.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · AIDS Care

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) represent a serious public health problem in Equatorial Guinea, with a prevalence of 6.2% among adults. the high-activity antiretroviral treatment (HAART) coverage data is 10 points below the overall estimate for Sub-Saharan Africa, and only 61% patients continue with HAART 12 months after it started. This study aims to assess HAART adherence and related factors in Litoral Province of Equatorial Guinea. In this cross-sectional study, socio-demographic and clinical data were collected at Regional Hospital of Bata, during June-July 2014. Adherence to treatment was assessed by using the Spanish version of CEAT-VIH. Bivariate and linear regression analyses were employed to assess HAART adherence-related factors. We interviewed 50 men (35.5%) and 91 women (64.5%), with a mean age of 47.7 ± 8.9 and 36.2 ± 11.2, respectively (p < .001). Overall, 55% patients had low or insufficient adherence. CEAT-VIH score varied by ethnic group (p = .005). There was a positive correlation between CEAT-VIH score and current CD4 T-cells count (p = .013). The Cronbach's α value was 0.52. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess HAART adherence in Equatorial Guinea. Internal reliability for CEAT-VIH was low, nonetheless the positive correlation between the CEAT-VIH score and the immunological status of patients add value to our findings. Our results serve as baseline for future research and will also assist stakeholders in planning and undertaking contextual and evidence-based policy initiatives.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: Late diagnosis occurs in almost half of those diagnosed in the UK (HIV Prevention England, 2013. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from HIV Prevention England: http://www.hivpreventionengland.org.uk/Campaigns-Current/National-HIV-Testing-Week ). Testing occurs mainly in sexual health and antenatal clinics despite recommendations to test more broadly [Ellis, S., & Curtis, H. (2012). HIV diagnoses and missed opportunities. Results of the British HIV association (BHIVA) National Audit 2010. Clinical Medicine, 12(5), 430-434]. We report the findings of an HIV-testing week campaign to offer testing to those who have blood tests as part of routine care within outpatient clinics and emergency departments of six London hospitals. The campaign target was to test 500 patients a day during the 2013 National HIV Testing Week (NHTW). Clinic staff and medical students were trained to offer routine HIV testing. Linkage to care was arranged for those who tested HIV-positive. During NHTW we tested 2402 of the planned 2500 test target. 2402/4317 (55.6% 95% CI 54.1-57.1%) of those who had routine blood tests were tested for HIV. There were eight HIV-positive tests; three were new diagnoses (all linked to care). The campaign hashtag #TestMeEast achieved a total Twitter "reach" of 238, 860 and the campaign had widespread news coverage. Our campaign showed that staff and students could be trained and mobilised to do thousands of routine HIV tests during a campaign.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: The current study examined the independent and combined effects of HIV and marijuana (MJ) use (no use, light use, and moderate-to-heavy use) on neurocognitive functioning among a convenience sample of HIV-positive (HIV+) and HIV-negative (HIV-) individuals recruited from HIV community care clinics and advertisements in the Greater Los Angeles area. MJ users consisted of individuals who reported regular use of MJ for at least 12 months, with last reported use within the past month. Participants included 89 HIV+ (n = 55) and HIV- (n = 34) individuals who were grouped into non-users, light users, and moderate-to-heavy users based on self-reported MJ use. Participants were administered a brief cognitive test battery and underwent laboratory testing for CD4 count and viral load. HIV+ individuals demonstrated lower performance on neurocognitive testing than controls, and moderate-to-heavy MJ users performed more poorly on neurocognitive testing than light users or non-users. Moderate-to-heavy HIV+ users performed significantly lower on learning/memory than HIV- moderate-to-heavy users (MD = -8.34; 95% CI: -16.11 to -0.56) as well as all other comparison groups. In the domain of verbal fluency, HIV+ light users outperformed HIV- light users (MD = 7.28; 95% CI: 1.62-12.39), but no HIV group differences were observed at other MJ use levels. HIV+ MJ users demonstrated lower viral load (MD = -0.58; 95% CI: -1.30 to 0.14) and higher CD4 count than non-users (MD = 137.67; 95% CI: 9.48-265.85). The current study findings extend the literature by demonstrating the complex relationship between HIV status and MJ use on neurocognitive and clinical outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: In order to increase patient active engagement during patient-provider interactions, we developed and implemented patient training sessions in four antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinics in Namibia using a "Patient Empowerment" training curriculum. We examined the impact of these trainings on patient-provider interactions after the intervention. We tested the effectiveness of the intervention using a randomized parallel group design, with half of the 589 enrolled patients randomly assigned to receive the training immediately and the remaining randomized to receive the training 6 months later. The effects of the training on patient engagement during medical consultations were measured at each clinic visit for at least 8 months of follow-up. Each consultation was audiotaped and then coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). RIAS outcomes were compared between study groups at 6 months. Using intention-to-treat analysis, consultations in the intervention group had significantly higher RIAS scores in doctor facilitation and patient activation (adjusted difference in score 1.19, p = .004), doctor information gathering (adjusted difference in score 2.96, p = .000), patient question asking (adjusted difference in score .48, p = .012), and patient positive affect (adjusted difference in score 2.08, p = .002). Other measures were higher in the intervention group but did not reach statistical significance. We have evidence that increased engagement of patients in clinical consultation can be achieved via a targeted training program, although outcome data were not available on all patients. The patient training program was successfully integrated into ART clinics so that the trainings complemented other services being provided.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: HIV-positive men who have sex with men (HIVMSM) face severe stigma and high levels of stressors, and have high prevalence of mental health problems (e.g., depression and anxiety). Very few studies explored the role of positive psychological factors on mental health problems among HIVMSM. The present study investigated the prevalence of two mental health problems (anxiety and depression), and their associated protective (gratitude) and risk (enacted HIV-related stigma, and perceived stress) factors among HIVMSM in China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 321 HIVMSM in Chengdu, China, by using a structured questionnaire. Over half (55.8%) of the participants showed probable mild to severe depression (as assessed by the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale); 53.3% showed probable anxiety (as assessed by the General Anxiety Disorder scale). Adjusted logistic regression models revealed that gratitude (adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 0.90, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) = 0.86-0.94) was found to be protective, whilst perceived stress (ORa = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.12-1.22) and enacted stigma (ORa = 7.72, 95% CI = 2.27-26.25) were risk factors of depression. Gratitude (ORa = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.91-0.99) was also found to be protective whilst perceived stress (ORa = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.14-1.24) was a risk factor of anxiety. Gratitude did not moderate the associations found between related factors and poor mental health. It is warranted to promote mental health among HIVMSM, as depression/anxiety was highly prevalent. Such interventions should consider enhancement of gratitude, reduction of stress, and removal of enacted stigma as potential strategies, as such factors were significantly associated with depression/anxiety among HIVMSM.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · AIDS Care
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    ABSTRACT: Supporting medication adherence is a priority in HIV care worldwide as low adherence threatens the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment (ART). While evidence on adherence causes and consequences has steadily accumulated, investigating current practice and relevant determinants of practitioners' behaviors has only recently been highlighted as essential for developing effective and sustainable interventions. In Romania, ART adherence is low despite universal access to HIV care, and improving support services is a priority. We report a qualitative exploration of practitioners' experiences and views on ART adherence support, guided by current behavioral theory. Semi-structured interviews were performed with 10 practitioners from six HIV centers, aiming for maximum variation sampling on professional experience, location, and organization type. Questions addressed practitioners' views and experiences on assessing patients' adherence behaviors and determinants, content and format of adherence support, and perceived influences on their capacity to deliver support. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed via template analysis. Results show that adherence support is provided in Romania by trained psychologists in multidisciplinary teams that operate flexibly and perform multiple HIV care activities. Assessment of adherence behaviors and determinants is primarily interview-based, and practitioners use mostly psychotherapeutic techniques and theories with a degree of intervention tailoring. Practitioners' descriptions covered a broad range of common determinants and behavior change techniques, but showed limited use of behavioral theory. Participants also described difficulties to cope with limited resources, and lack of support for managing practical and emotional challenges. Several opportunities for improvement were identified, such as standardizing patient profiling and intervention delivery, conceptualizing and recording active intervention content based on behavioral theory, and actively monitoring intervention effectiveness. This qualitative inquiry provided valuable information for improving adherence support in this clinical context. Understanding practitioners' perspectives based on behavioral theory-informed analyses can help intervention developers increase intervention fidelity by integrating current practice information in program design.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · AIDS Care