Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics (Asia Pac J Market Logist)

Publisher: University College of Southern Queensland, Emerald

Journal description

The Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics (APJML) aims to provide a unique focus on marketing and logistics in the Asia Pacific region. It includes articles which focus on marketing and logistics problems, new procedures and practical approaches, systematic and critical reviews of changes in marketing and logistics and cross-national and cross-cultural comparisons of theory into practice.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing & Logistics website
Other titles Asia Pacific journal of marketing and logistics, Journal of marketing and logistics
ISSN 1355-5855
OCLC 29833739
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Emerald

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of author's pre-print or author's post-print allowed on author's personal website or Institutional repository
    • If mandated by a funding agency, the author's post-print may be deposited in any open access repository after a 24 months embargo period
    • Author's pre-print and Author's post-print not allowed on subject-based repository
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set statement
    • Non-commercial
    • Publisher last contacted on 02/04/2013
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – Marketing research has focussed more on in-group favoritism and out-group derogation (i.e. ethnocentrism) than out-group favoritism and in-group derogation (i.e. xenocentrism). The purpose of this paper is to explore the xenocentric behavior in the consumer sphere to explain why some consumers have a bias for foreign products even when domestic ones are qualitatively similar or better. As the Chinese economy has experienced more than three decades of near double-digit growth and increased openness to foreign products, it is important to examine phenomena related to the formation of Chinese attitudes toward foreign products with the rising tensions between the seemingly irreversible globalization and Chinese re-awakening nationalism. Design/methodology/approach – This study is based on a review of the extant literature and focus groups in three cities in China. Findings – This study has found that consumer xenocentrism (CX) is prevalent in China, especially among the new emerging wealthy classes, younger consumers, and the local elite. It appears that Chinese consumers are psychologically or sociologically orientated or predisposed toward foreign (Western) goods. The findings from this study suggest that both consumer ethnocentrism and CX are possible or even expected. The short review of Chinese history presented here has shown that these phenomena can be explained by traditional in-group/out-group theories. Specifically, when there are too many xenocentrics, national esteem is threatened and this prompts many individuals to become more ethnocentric. Research limitations/implications – This study is based on the literature and focus groups data, hence, the findings are not intended to be generalizable. Practical implications – The findings from this study should be of interest to business practitioners and policy makers. Social implications – The historical and cultural perspectives taken in this study indicate that understanding consumers’ xenocentric behavior entails knowledge and deep understanding of how cultural values and contemporary social-political forces interplay within consumers’ formation and change of attitudes toward the choice of domestic and foreign products. Originality/value – This study shows that the ability of foreign products to meet the individual’s need or enhance his/her self-esteem more so than domestic products is indicative of something more than simply an international, cosmopolitan, or modern orientation. The fact that consumer foreign bias is found with both mundane and widely available products, expensive and inexpensive products, and conspicuous and non-conspicuous goods challenges the assumption that this phenomenon is simply traditional prestige-consumption behavior. Future research needs to be directed at measuring the CX construct and examine potential antecedents of such a behavior.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the country-of-origin (COO) effect on product evaluation to determine the different effects of COO in Asian nations. Design/methodology/approach – The authors focus on automobiles as the target product category and conduct consumer surveys in three Asian countries – China, Japan, and South Korea – and the USA. Since these four countries are the major global production bases and consumption markets, the authors can examine the reciprocal effects of COO across countries. The authors propose a hierarchical conjoint analysis and estimate parameters. For the attributes of conjoint analysis, the authors incorporate both the COO of products and other functional aspects such as price and fuel consumption to compare their effects on consumer evaluation. Findings – The authors find different tendencies in each country’s COO effect. Further, the authors discuss the factors affecting consumer evaluation in each country based on the country’s culture and general product images. Originality/value – The authors’ contributions to the literature are as follows. First, in the research design, the authors incorporate COO information as an attribute of automobiles. This enables us to compare the COO effect with the effects of other functional aspects. The authors find that the COO effect is substantially the same as the effect of other functional attributes. Second, the authors assume a hierarchical structure in the conjoint analysis and discuss the different preferences in each country. This hierarchical structure enables to extract the reciprocal effects of COO across countries.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – Corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication is a strategy to address companies’ goodwill to the society. Based on the institutional theory suggesting the influence of environmental factors of companies’ country-of-origins on their marketing practices, the purpose of this paper is to explore and compare the CSR communication practices of apparel firms from different countries. Design/methodology/approach – As a case study approach, this study investigates six apparel firms’ CSR communication disclosures on the official websites using a content analysis method and the Global Reporting Initiative’s categorial CSR reporting guidelines. Findings – Findings revealed that the six firms’ CSR communication adoption levels and focusses varied; the USA firms largely focussed on labor issues, while the European firms focussed on environmental issues and the Asian firms centered on social issues. Research limitations/implications – Although this study has limitations that pertain to case studies in general, this study provides academic contributions to the literature and managerial implications about different CSR focusses and communication activities across countries. Originality/value – CSR is especially important for the apparel business that highly involves social issues such as labor-intensive production. However, limited research showed how apparel firms are actually communicating CSR. This study was one of the early attempts on this topic.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to integrate guerrilla marketing characteristics into advertising model through which the perceived effects of guerrilla marketing on Gen Y are identified, and to examine such effects on word of mouth (WOM) activity with the mediation of message credibility. Design/methodology/approach – The study obtains its exploratory purpose through quantitative method by asking Gen Y participants about their perceptions of 20 guerrilla advertisements in the questionnaires. Those advertisements and the advertising scales are selectively chosen from previous literature so that the results truthfully reflect the effects of guerrilla marketing under consumer perspective. Findings – The results show that, creativity, as a combination of novelty and relevance, has the strongest direct and indirect effect on WOM intention. Similarly, surprise factor, the claimed root philosophy of guerrilla marketing, is confirmed when it also impacts directly and indirectly consumer behaviour. Message credibility plays a meaningful mediation role, and through this, message clarity manifests its indirect influence on WOM. Originality/value – The study supports the belief that guerrilla marketing is suitable for any business because of its effectiveness and efficiency. More significantly, the awareness of Gen Y consumers of the advertisements, with or without knowing that these ads belong to guerrilla advertising, strengthens the expectation that guerrilla marketing in general and guerrilla advertising in particular are recommended choices when they reflect what common marketing and advertising should be.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – While the Internet has emerged as a retail force to be reckoned with, its’ success is dependent, at least in part, on other promotional tools. One such tool is permission email marketing (PEM). Operating within the framework of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), this study explores the influence of PEM on the perceived value derived from Internet shopping. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected through an online survey in Melbourne, Australia. Utilising a sample of 338 consumers, the resulting data was analysed using structural equation modelling. Findings – The results of the study indicate that PEM positively influences the perceived usefulness, ease of use and enjoyment derived from shopping online. Furthermore, it also serves to reduce the perceived risk. PEM serves as an important extension of the TAM, with the findings from this study highlighting not only what the sources of online shopping value are, but also how they can be influenced. Research limitations/implications – The limitation applies to the research context in which the study was carried out – fashion shopping. Practical implications – The study confirms the importance of PEM and highlights to retailers that they have another important tool at their disposal. Originality/value – This study highlights the importance of PEM and support the proposition that its key source of value lies in providing information that the consumer wants. Such relevance is the key of distinction between PEM and SPAM. Despite the rapid growth of Internet shopping in Australia, very few online shopping studies have been conducted in an Australian context. This study helps to address such an oversight. Keywords E-commerce, online shopping, permission marketing, technology acceptance model
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to determine the antecedents of speed to market (SM). Further, a model was established on SM with the organizational variables of enacting organizational environment (EOE), organizational infrastructure (OI), project complexity (PC) and creation of collective mind (CCM). Design/methodology/approach – This research was based on structured survey questionnaire data of 415 managers from private and public sector firms in India. The data analysis was carried out with SPSS 20 and AMOS 18 for structural equation modeling. Findings – Research results indicated that the exogenous factors were EOE and OI. PC and CCM were the intervening variables and SM was the endogenous variables. The result indicated that there was significant positive relationship between EOE and PC, EOE and CCM. There was also a significant positive relationship between the variables EOE with PC, OI with PC and CCM with PC. Finally there existed a significant positive relationship between PC and SM and CCM and SM. Research limitations/implications – This research study was one of the first research studies developing a model on SM with the exogenous variables of EOE and OI and the intervening variables of PC and CCM. Practical implications – The managers in both public and private sector organizations looking to create and sustain competitive advantage by providing a fast and apt response to market demand by product development can use the inputs from the study. Organizations should be developed in such a manner to enrich the EOE and have a agile and flexible OI. This would help organizations in having CCM and undertake PC. A well-coordinated effort encompassing all these would help the organization to have a fast and steady SM. Originality/value – This research was one of the very first studies relating SM with EOE, OI, PC and CCM in an emerging market context.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a scale to measure social religiosity (SR) and assess its measurement invariance across different cultures. Design/methodology/approach – The research relied on samples from China (n=486), India (n=377), Japan (n=362), Korea (n=386), and the USA (n=580). The invariance process involved carrying out a series of confirmatory factor analyses with progressively more restrictive constraints. Findings – Results show the SR scale to be reliable and valid across culturally and religiously diverse countries. Implications of the findings are also discussed. Originality/value – Based on Katz (1988) this is a new scale to measure SR and its measurement invariance is assessed across culturally divergent countries.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the accelerated growth within the Australian do-it-yourself (DIY) market and discusses the factors and drivers affecting consumer motivations to engage in such assembly tasks. Design/methodology/approach – Using a case study approach, evaluations and critical analysis of the DIY industry was being formulated by drawing on real life brands and examples. An analysis of various DIY retail strategies and DIY decking companies was synthesised to provide insights into the DIY industry. Findings – The insights into the industry outlines the changing consumer attitudes and motivations towards DIY and decking tasks. The findings on an evolving DIY industry, in particular the decking market demonstrate useful implications for academics, policy makers and brand practitioners. Originality/value – There have been little industry studies that delve into specifically decking products. Considering the vast increase in homeware, renovations, and gardening, the study provides insights from various case studies into the strategies undertaken by Australian and global companies. In addition, the majority of studies undertaken have also been concerned with the intrinsic motivations of consumers and not necessarily the extrinsic effect that brands and retailers advertently and inadvertently communicate and signal to consumers of DIY products.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to compare organizational web site design attributes between US and Chinese small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Design/methodology/approach – The study uses 18 web site design variables identified by previous research. Findings – The results show that US and Chinese SME corporate web sites have both similarities and differences in terms of web site design attributes. The design differences are not much affected by the impacts of macro-economy and technology gaps. However, US and Chinese SMEs may differ in terms of their marketing practices and cultural orientations, and as a result, web site design attributes still remain significantly different. Originality/value – Marketing and cultural factors are found to be important determinants in SMEs’ organizational web site design across the two countries.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – On the basis of lessons gleaned from previous research into successful strategic marketing practices in times of both recession and growth, and in the face of an ongoing post-global financial crisis “hangover” characterised by unpredictable trading conditions both worldwide and in the Asia-Pacific region, the purpose of this paper is to provide insights and advice for marketing strategists within New Zealand’s manufacturing sector. Design/methodology/approach – The inquiry is based on two point-in-time mail surveys, one during recessionary conditions and the other during favourable economic conditions, with similar samples of 427 and 272 New Zealand manufacturers, respectively. Data analyses were conducted using SPSS and sought to compare and contrast successful strategic marketing decision making between the two time-points. Findings – The results confirm that, irrespective of prevailing economic circumstances, basic strategic marketing plays a pivotal role in facilitating the competitive success of New Zealand manufacturers. However, with the notable exception of three “evergreen” practices – targeting selected market segments, competing on the basis of value-to-the-customer, and finding new ways to do business – the results also suggest that different economic conditions otherwise necessitate quite different priorities for success at each stage of the strategic marketing decision-making process. Research limitations/implications – Due to relatively low-response rates, the extent to which the study samples are representative of the population under scrutiny remains unknown. Also, since an identical questionnaire was administered at two time-points ten years apart, differences in the respondents’ interpretation of certain questions and some of the marketing vocabulary and terminology used cannot be ruled out. Practical implications – The research highlights the important contribution that strategic marketing makes to the achievement of competitive success in New Zealand’s manufacturing sector. It also identifies some of the underlying “key drivers” that best predict successful strategic marketing decision making in times of recession compared with growth, thereby indicating a number of key lessons for marketing strategists. Originality/value – This study addresses a number of gaps in the empirical marketing literature. Although many previous studies have shown various strategic marketing activities to be critical to competitive success, few have examined it as a multi-step decision-making process and none have done so in the context of New Zealand manufacturing. Nor have previous studies sought to compare and contrast effective strategic marketing decision-making set against the background of contrasting economic circumstances.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics