Allergology International (Allergol Int)

Publisher: Nihon Arerugī Gakkai, Wiley

Journal description

Allergology International is the official journal of the Japanese Society of Allergology and publishes original papers dealing with the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of allergic and related diseases. Papers may include the study of methods of controlling allergic reactions, human and animal models of hypersensitivity and other aspects of basic and applied clinical allergy in its broadest sense. The Journal aims to encourage the international exchange of results and encourages authors from all countries to submit papers in the following five categories: Original Articles, Case Reports, Short Communications, Occasional Reviews and Editorials, Letters to the Editor, and Hypothesis.

Current impact factor: 2.46

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.457

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 4.90
Immediacy index 0.73
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Allergology International website
Other titles Allergology international (Online), Allergol Int
ISSN 1323-8930
OCLC 45113966
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo for scientific, technical and medicine titles
    • 2 years embargo for humanities and social science titles
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • On a non-profit server
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is not available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 6 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • If OnlineOpen is not available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • Reviewed 18/03/14
    • Please see former John Wiley & Sons and Blackwell Publishing policies for articles published prior to February 2007
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Allergology International
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    ABSTRACT: Backgrounds: It remains unclear whether a persistently high exhaled nitric oxide fraction (FeNO) in patients with controlled asthma is associated with the progressive loss of lung function. Methods: This was a 3-year prospective study. We examined the changes in pre- and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and FeNO in 140 patients with controlled asthma. We initially determined the FeNO cut-off point for identifying patients with a rapid decline in FEV1 (>40 mL/yr). Next, a total of 122 patients who maintained high or non-high FeNO were selected, and the associations between the FeNO trend and changes in FEV1 and bronchodilator response (BDR) were investigated. Results: A FeNO level >40.3 ppb yielded 43% sensitivity and 86% specificity for identifying patients with a rapid decline in FEV1. Patients with persistently high FeNO had higher rates of decline in FEV1 (42.7 ± 37.5 mL/yr) than patients with non-high FeNO (16.7 ± 31.5 mL/yr) (p < 0.0005). The changes in BDR from baseline to the end of the study, in patients who had high or non-high levels of FeNO were -0.8% and 0.1%, respectively (p < 0.01). In a multivariate analysis adjusted by age, body mass index, asthma control, blood eosinophil numbers, and FEV1% of predicted, a FeNO level of ≥40 ppb was independently associated with an accelerated decline in FEV1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: This study suggests that FeNO is potentially valuable tool for identifying individuals who are at risk of a progressive loss of lung function among patients with controlled asthma.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Allergology International
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Allergology International
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Although right middle lobe (RML)-atelectasis of the lungs is a common complication of asthma, the relevant data is limited. The aim of this study is to define the characteristics of RML atelectasis in asthma during childhood. Methods: Children with asthma who had recently developed RML atelectasis were included; anti-inflammatory medications, clarithromycin, and inhaled salbutamol were prescribed, chest-physiotherapy (starting on the sixth day) was applied. Patients were reevaluated on the sixth, fourteenth, thirtieth, and ninetieth days, chest X-rays were taken if the atelectasis had not resolved at the time of the previous visit. Results: Twenty-seven patients (6.8 (4.8-8.3) years, 48.1% male) with RML atelectasis were included. Symptoms started 15 (7-30) days before admission. The thickness of the atelectasis was 11.8 ± 5.8 mm; FEV1% was 75.9 ± 14.2 and Childhood Asthma Control Test scores were 11.8 ± 5.6 at the time of admission. The atelectasis had been resolved by the sixth (n = 3), fourteenth (n = 9), thirtieth (n = 10), and ninetieth days (n = 3). The treatment response of the patients whose atelectasis resolved in fourteen days was better on the sixth-day (atelectasis thickness: 4.7 ± 1.7 vs. 11.9 ± 7.3 mm, p = 0.021) compared to those whose atelectasis resolved later. Nearly half (54.5%) of the patients whose atelectasis had resolved by fourteen days were using controller medications at the time of admission. However, only two patients (13.3%) were on controller treatment in the latter group (p = 0.032). Regression analysis didn't reveal any prognostic factors for the early resolution of atelectasis. Conclusions: Early diagnosis and treatment of RML atelectasis prevents complications. Patients who had early resolution of atelectasis had already been on anti-inflammatory medications, and responded better to aggressive treatment within the first week.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Allergology International
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Allergology International
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Allergology International
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    ABSTRACT: Asthma and other allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic non-communicable diseases of childhood. According to the World Health Organization, asthma affects >7.0 million children under 18 in the United States, with an economic burden that is estimated to exceed that of tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS combined. Despite much research, the natural history of asthma and its pathogenesis are still in many ways elusive. This review discusses our current understanding of the role epigenetic processes play in asthma pathogenesis, focusing on genome-wide, population-based studies.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Allergology International
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Many patients with vocal cord dysfunction (VCD), with or without asthma, receive inappropriate treatment because they are misdiagnosed as having difficult-to-control asthma alone. We developed a clinical screening check list designed to aid the diagnosis of VCD. Methods: A prospective observational study involving 80 patients aged ≥18 years, diagnosed with severe asthma. After anamnesis and physical examination, physicians completed a check list with 6 questions to identify VCD, for which the answer "yes" counted one point. Then patients underwent spirometry and laryngoscopy. On the basis of the laryngoscopic findings, we created three patient groups: VCD (vocal cord adduction during inspiration, n = 14); unconfirmed VCD (inconclusive findings, n = 29); and control (normal findings, n = 37). We attempted to determine whether any of those groups were associated with the responses to individual questions or sets of questions on the check list. Results: The proportion of affirmative answers to the question "Does pulmonary auscultation reveal wheezing, predominantly in the cervical region, and/or stridor?" was significantly higher for the VCD group than for the other two groups (P = 0.006), notably in elderly patients. The variable "4 or more affirmative answers" was more common in VCD and unconfirmed VCD groups in comparison to controls (P = 0.022). Conclusions: A finding of wheezing or stridor on auscultation of the cervical region is suggestive of vocal cord dysfunction, especially in elderly patients, and such dysfunction can be confirmed through laryngoscopy. Our VCD screening check list proved to be useful in the screening of VCD among patients with severe asthma.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Allergology International
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    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Allergology International
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Asian dust (AD) has become a major health concern. The concentration of AD is typically expressed in particulate matter less than 10 μm (PM10) and 2.5 μm (PM2.5). However, PM10 and PM2.5 consist of various substances besides AD. Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems can selectively measure the quantity of AD particles to distinguish non-spherical airborne particles from spherical airborne particles. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between pulmonary function in adult asthma patients and AD using LIDAR data. Methods: Subjects were 231 adult asthma patients who had their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) measured from March to May 2012. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the association of PEF with sand dust particles detected by LIDAR. Results: Increases in the interquartile range of AD particles (0.018 km(-1)) led to changes in PEF of -0.42 L/min (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.85 to 0.01). An increase of 11.8 μg/m(3) in suspended particulate matter and 6.9 μg/m(3) in PM2.5 led to decreases of -0.17 L/min (-0.53 to 0.21) and 0.03 L/min (-0.35 to 0.42), respectively. A heavy AD day was defined as a day with a level of AD particles >0.032 km(-1), which was the average plus one standard deviation during the study period, and six heavy AD days were identified. Change in PEF after a heavy AD day was -0.97 L/min (-1.90 to -0.04). Conclusions: Heavy exposure to AD particles was significantly associated with decreased pulmonary function in adult asthma patients.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Allergology International
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common chronic diseases in children. Although it has a large impact on the patient's quality of life, little is known about the factors associated with its severity. The aim of this study was to assess the factors associated with the severity of rhinoconjunctivitis among children in the general population. Methods: A survey was conducted using an online research panel in 2012. Parents were asked to answer an International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood-based questionnaire to identify children with current rhinoconjunctivitis and evaluate factors associated with the severity of its symptoms. Severity was rated according to the degree of impairment caused by the symptoms in the patient's daily life. Results: Among 26,725 children aged 6-12 years old, rhinoconjunctivitis was defined in 5175 (19.4%), and of these, 688 children (13.3% of children with current rhinoconjunctivitis) presented severe symptoms. Living in areas with a high cedar and cypress pollen count and having concurrent eczema were associated with severe rhinoconjunctivitis [adjusted OR (95% CI): 1.21 (1.00-1.46) and 1.45 (1.20-1.75), respectively]. Further, a maternal history of asthma and allergic rhinitis was a significant risk factor for severe rhinoconjunctivitis [1.34 (1.04-1.74) and 1.30 (1.10-1.53), respectively]. However, living with fur-bearing animals (pets) before 1 year of age proved to be a protective factor against severe rhinoconjunctivitis [0.70 (0.52-0.94)]. Conclusions: Environmental factors such as pets and pollen, together with comorbidities and a maternal history of allergic diseases, play an important role in determining the severity of rhinoconjunctivitis.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Allergology International
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    ABSTRACT: Background: IL-33, a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, binds to heterodimeric receptors ST2 and IL-1 receptor accessory protein, and activates Th2-type immune responses. The signals from the ST2 receptor are mediated by the two major pathways, including AP-1 and NF-κB molecules. The present study examined whether IL-33 induced ICAM-1 expression in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Methods: BMMCs from C57BL/6J mice, cultured in media containing IL-3 (20 ng/ml), were treated with IL-33 (50 ng/ml) for up to 72 h. ICAM-1 expression with mRNA and protein, degranulation of siRNA ICAM-1 transfected BMMCs, and cell adhesion were analyzed. In the in vivo part of the experiment rIL-33 (500 ng) was injected intradermally into the ear pinnae of mice and any resulting pathological changes were assessed. Results: ICAM-1 mRNA expression was increased one hour after IL-33 stimulation while ICAM-1 protein attained maximum expression levels 24 h after IL-33 stimulation. Moreover, IL-33-treated BMMCs showed increased cell adhesion to the LFA-1-coated plate. However, siRNA ICAM-1 transfected BMMCs did not affect Ag/IgE-mediated degranulation level compared to the wild control siRNA. Pre-treatment with a NF-κB inhibitor dramatically reduced ICAM-1 expression in IL-33-treated BMMCs, suggesting the involvement of NF-κB in the process. In vivo study, at 6 h after IL-33 treatment, MCs histologically showed up-regulated ICAM-1 expression though the number of tryptase-positive cells did not change. Conclusions: These data suggest that MCs increase ICAM-1 expression and activate LFA-1 positive cells in the early phase of skin inflammation in response to IL-33.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Allergology International
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    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Allergology International
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    ABSTRACT: IgE-mediated hypersensitivity refers to immune reactions that can be rapidly progressing and, in the case of anaphylaxis, are occasionally fatal. To that end, identification of the associated allergen is important for facilitating both education and allergen avoidance that are essential to long-term risk reduction. As the number of known exposures associated with anaphylaxis is limited, discovery of novel causative agents is crucial to evaluation and management of patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis. Within the last 10 years several apparently separate observations were recognized to be related, all of which resulted from the development of antibodies to a carbohydrate moiety on proteins. Interestingly, the exposure differed from airborne allergens but was nevertheless capable of producing anaphylactic and hypersensitivity reactions. Our recent work has identified these responses as being due to a novel IgE antibody directed against a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (“alpha-gal”). This review will present the historical summary of the identification of cetuximab hypersensitivity due to alpha-gal IgE and discuss the non-primate mammalian meat food allergy as well as current goals and directions of our research programs.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Allergology International