Phytotherapy Research (Phytother Res)

Publisher: Wiley

Journal description

Phytotherapy Research is a bimonthly plus two additional issues international journal for the publication of original medical plant research including biochemistry and molecular pharmacology toxicology pathology and the clinical applications of herbs and natural products to both human and animal medicine. Papers are also published concerning chemical and botanical identification of herbs or their products where such information contributes to the overall safety of plant based medicines currently in use. Papers and communications concerned solely with the identification and structure elucidation of natural products will only be considered where the work contributes directly to the understanding of the use of the plant as a medicine. Phytotherapy Research publishes full-length original research papers short communications reviews and letters on medicinal plant research. Clincal papers on the applications of herbs and natural products to both human and animal medicine may vary from case histories to full clinical trials. Papers concerned with the effects of common food ingredients and standardised plant extracts including commercial products are welcome as are mechanistic studies on isolated natural products. Phytotherapy Research does not publish purely agricultural phytochemical structure elucidation and identification papers unless pertinent to the pharmacological effects or overall safety of plant based medicines currently in use. Papers dealing with the pharmacology and screening of crude extracts often deal with local medicinal plants and are of only limited interest to an international readership. Therefore please consider carefully whether your paper would be more appropriate to a national journal before sending it to Phytotherapy Research . Crude extract papers will still be considered for publication as short communications but only if they are a single published page in length (equivalent to 600 words to include due allowance for any illustrations). Longer manuscripts will be returned without being reviewed .

Current impact factor: 2.66

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.66
2013 Impact Factor 2.397
2012 Impact Factor 2.068
2011 Impact Factor 2.086
2010 Impact Factor 1.878
2009 Impact Factor 1.746
2008 Impact Factor 1.772
2007 Impact Factor 1.43
2006 Impact Factor 1.144
2005 Impact Factor 1.192
2004 Impact Factor 0.975
2003 Impact Factor 0.803
2002 Impact Factor 0.875
2001 Impact Factor 0.603
2000 Impact Factor 0.422
1999 Impact Factor 0.364
1998 Impact Factor 0.509
1997 Impact Factor 0.525
1996 Impact Factor 0.509
1995 Impact Factor 0.538
1994 Impact Factor 0.46
1993 Impact Factor 0.537
1992 Impact Factor 0.363

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.46
Cited half-life 7.00
Immediacy index 0.57
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.49
Website Phytotherapy Research website
Other titles Phytotherapy research (Online), Phytotherapy research, PTR
ISSN 1099-1573
OCLC 44085665
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • Non-Commercial
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 07/08/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Obesity and overweight are major health issues. Exercise and calorie intake control are recognized as the primary mechanisms for addressing excess body weight. Naturally occurring thermogenic plant constituents offer adjunct means for assisting in weight management. The controlling mechanisms for thermogenesis offer many intervention points. Thermogenic agents can act through stimulation of the central nervous system with associated adverse cardiovascular effects and through metabolic mechanisms that are non-stimulatory or a combination thereof. Examples of stimulatory thermogenic agents that will be discussed include ephedrine and caffeine. Examples of non-stimulatory thermogenic agents include p-synephrine (bitter orange extract), capsaicin, forskolin (Coleus root extract), and chlorogenic acid (green coffee bean extract). Green tea is an example of a thermogenic with the potential to produce mild but clinically insignificant undesirable stimulatory effects. The use of the aforementioned thermogenic agents in combination with other extracts such as those derived from Salacia reticulata, Sesamum indicum, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Cissus quadrangularis, and Moringa olifera, as well as the use of the carotenoids as lutein and fucoxanthin, and flavonoids as naringin and hesperidin can further facilitate energy metabolism and weight management as well as sports performance without adverse side effects. © 2016 The Authors Phytotherapy Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Smilacis Chinae Rhizome (SCR) has been used as an oriental folk medicine for various biological activities. However, its effect on atopic dermatitis (AD) remains undetermined to date. We assessed the effect of orally administered hot-water extract of SCR on AD-like skin lesions in mice and its underlying mechanisms. AD-like murine model was prepared by repeated alternate application of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae) extract (DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) for 4 weeks, topically to the ears. Daily oral administration of SCR for 3 and 4 weeks significantly reduced inflammatory ear thickening, with the effect being enhanced at the earlier start and longer period of administration. This effect was accompanied by a significant decrease in both Th2 and Th1 serum antibodies (total IgE, DFE-specific IgE, and IgG2a). Histological analysis showed that SCR markedly decreased the epidermal/dermal ear thickening and the dermal infiltration of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, SCR suppressed DFE/DNCB-induced expression of IL-4, IL-13, IL-17, IL-18, TSLP, and IFN-γ genes in the ear tissue. Taken together, our observations demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SCR exerts beneficial effect in mouse AD model, suggesting that SCR has the therapeutic potential as an orally active treatment of AD by modulating both Th1 and Th2 responses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Oral cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Despite advances in chemotherapy for the cancer management, the survival rate has not yet been improved. Dietary nutrient has been receiving a lot of attention and interest in the chemotherapeutic development. [6]-Shogaol is a major bioactive compound identified in ginger that possesses many pharmacological properties. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of [6]-shogaol on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. Oral squamous cell carcinoma induced in HBP by painting with 0.5% 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), thrice in a week for 16 weeks. We observed 100% tumour incidence, decreased levels of lipid peroxidation, antioxidant, and phase II detoxification enzymes (GST, GR and GSH) in DMBA-induced hamsters. Further, enhanced activity of phase I enzymes (cytochrome p450 and b5) and over-expression of mutant p53, Bcl-2 and decreased expression of wild type p53 and Bax were noticed in DMBA-induced hamsters. Our results indicated that [6]-shogaol (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight) treated with DMBA-painted hamsters, considerably reversed tumour incidence, improved antioxidant status, phase II detoxification enzymes, and also inhibit lipid peroxidation and phase I enzymes. Moreover, [6]-shogaol inhibits mutant p53 and Bcl-2 expression and significantly restored normal p53, Bax levels. Thus, we concluded that [6]-shogaol prevents DMBA-induced HBP carcinogenesis through its antioxidant as well as modulating apoptotic signals. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway.Copyright
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effects of plants on osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of human periodontal ligament cells. The included studies were selected using five different electronic databases. The reference list of the included studies was crosschecked, and a partial gray literature search was undertaken using Google Scholar and ProQuest. The methodology of the selected studies was evaluated using GRADE. After a two-step selection process, eight studies were identified. Six different types of plants were reported in the selected studies, which were Morinda citrifolia, Aloe vera, Fructus cnidii, Zanthoxylum schinifolium, Centella asiatica, and Epimedium species. They included five types of isolated plant components: acemannan, osthole, hesperetin, asiaticoside, and icariin. In addition, some active substances of these components were identified as polysaccharides, coumarins, flavonoids, and triterpenes. The studies demonstrated the potential effects of plants on osteogenic differentiation, cell proliferation, mineral deposition, and gene and protein expression. Four studies showed that periodontal ligament cells induce mineral deposition after plant treatment. Although there are few studies on the subject, current evidence suggests that plants are potentially useful for the treatment of periodontal diseases. However, further investigations are required to confirm the promising effect of these plants in regenerative treatments. Copyright
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Passiflora incarnata L. has been used as a medicinal plant in South America and Europe since the 16th century. Previous pharmacological studies focused mainly on the plant's sedative, anxiolytic, and anticonvulsant effects on the central nervous system and its supporting role in the treatment of addiction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of long-term oral administration of P. incarnata. The passionflower extract (30, 100, or 300 mg/kg body weight/day) was given to 4-week-old male Wistar rats via their drinking water. Tests were conducted after 7 weeks of treatment. Spatial memory was assessed in a water maze, and the levels of amino acids, monoamines, and their metabolites were evaluated in select brain regions by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We observed reduced anxiety and dose-dependent improvement of memory in rats given passionflower compared to the control group. In addition, hippocampal glutamic acid and cortical serotonin content were depleted, with increased levels of metabolites and increased turnover. Thus, our results partially confirmed the proposed mechanism of action of P. incarnata involving GABAA receptors. Copyright
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: This study was aimed to investigate the capacity of a standardized root water extract of Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali, TA), Physta® to modulate human immunity in a middle-aged Japanese population. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel study was conducted for 4 weeks. Eighty-four of 126 subjects had relatively lower scores according to Scoring of Immunological Vigor (SIV) screening. Subjects were instructed to ingest either 200 mg/day of TA or rice powder as a placebo for 4 weeks [TA and Placebo (P) groups] and to visit a clinic in Tokyo twice (weeks 0 and 4). SIV, immunological grade, immunological age, and other immune parameters were measured. Eighty-three subjects completed the study; 40 in the TA group and 41 in the P group were statistically analyzed, whereas two were excluded from the analyses. At week 4, the SIV and immunological grade were significantly higher in the TA group than those in P group (p < 0.05). The numbers of total, naïve, and CD4(+) T cells were also higher in the TA group than those in P group (p < 0.05). No severe adverse events were observed. The results suggest that ingestion of the root water extract of TA (Physta®) enhances comprehensive immunity in both middle-aged men and women. This study is registered in UMIN-CTR (UMIN000011753). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Moringa oleifera Lam. is used as a nutritive vegetable and spice. Its ethanol extract has been previously shown to be significantly effective in alleviating herpetic skin lesions in mice. In this study, we evaluated the alleviation by the aqueous extract (AqMOL) and assessed the mode of its anti-herpetic action in a murine cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection model. AqMOL (300 mg/kg) was administered orally to HSV-1-infected mice three times daily on days 0 to 5 after infection. AqMOL significantly limited the development of herpetic skin lesions and reduced virus titers in the brain on day 4 without toxicity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction to inactivated HSV-1 antigen was significantly stronger in infected mice administered AqMOL and AqMOL augmented interferon (IFN)-γ production by HSV-1 antigen from splenocytes of HSV-1-infected mice at 4 days post-infection. AqMOL administration was effective in elevating the ratio of CD11b+ and CD49b+ subpopulations of splenocytes in infected mice. As DTH is a major host defense mechanism for intradermal HSV infection, augmentation of the DTH response by AqMOL may contribute to their efficacies against HSV-1 infection. These results provided an important insights into the mechanism by which AqMOL activates cellular immunity. Copyright
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Hydroxy-safflower yellow A (HSYA) is the major active component of safflower, a traditional Asia herbal medicine well known for its cardiovascular protective activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of HSYA on TNF-α-induced inflammatory responses in arterial endothelial cells (AECs) and to explore the mechanisms involved. The results showed that HSYA suppressed the up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression in TNF-α-stimulated AECs in a dose-dependent manner. High concentration (120 μM) HSYA significantly inhibited the TNF-α-induced adhesion of RAW264.7 cells to AECs. HSYA blocked the TNFR1-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα and also prevented the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. Moreover, HSYA reduced the cell surface level of TNFR1 and increased the content of sTNFR1 in the culture media. TNF-α processing inhibitor-0 (TAPI-0) prevented the HSYA inhibition of TNFR1-induced IκBα degradation, implying the occurrence of TNFR1 shedding. Furthermore, HSYA induced phosphorylation of TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) at threonine 735, which is thought to be required for its activation. Conclusively, HSYA suppressed TNF-α-induced inflammatory responses in AECs, at least in part by inhibiting the TNFR1-mediated classical NF-κB pathway. TACE-mediated TNFR1 shedding can be involved in this effect. Our study provides new evidence for the antiinflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic effects of HSYA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Cholestasis is a leading cause of hepatic accumulation of bile acids resulting in liver injury, fibrosis, and liver failure. Paeoniflorin displays bright prospects in liver protective effect. However, its molecular mechanism has not been well-explored. This study was designed to assess the effects and possible mechanisms of paeoniflorin against alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate-induced liver injury. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight combined with principle component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis were integrated to obtain differentiating metabolites for the pathways and clarify mechanisms of disease. The results indicated that paeoniflorin could remarkably downregulate serum biochemical indexes and alleviate the histological damage of liver tissue. Different expression of 14 metabolites demonstrated that paeoniflorin mainly regulated the dysfunctions of glycerophospholipid metabolism and primary bile acid biosynthesis. Moreover, several pathways such as arginine and proline metabolism, ether lipid metabolism, and arachidonic acid metabolism were also related to the efficacy. In conclusion, paeoniflorin has indicated favorable pharmacological effect on serum biochemical indexes and pathological observation on cholestatic model. And metabolomics is a promising approach to unraveling hepatoprotective effects by partially regulating the perturbed pathways, which provide insights into mechanisms of cholestasis. Copyright
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Metabolic syndrome is associated with several disorders, including hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia as well as cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Plant-derived polyphenols, compounds found in numerous plant species, play an important role as potential treatments for components of metabolic syndrome. Studies have provided evidence for protective effects of various polyphenol-rich foods against metabolic syndrome. Fruits, vegetables, cereals, nuts, and berries are rich in polyphenolic compounds. Grapes (Vitis vinifera), especially grape seeds, stand out as rich sources of polyphenol potent antioxidants and have been reported helpful for inhibiting the risk factors involved in the metabolic syndrome such as hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. There are also many studies about gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, and anti-obesity effects of grape polyphenolic compounds especially proanthocyanidins in the literature. The present study investigates the protective effects of grape seeds in metabolic syndrome. The results of this study show that grape polyphenols have significant effects on the level of blood glucose, lipid profile, blood pressure, as well as beneficial activities in liver and heart with various mechanisms. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of grape polyphenols is discussed. More detailed mechanistic investigations and phytochemical studies for finding the exact bioactive component(s) and molecular signaling pathways are suggested. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: The herb-derived compounds silymarin, glycyrrhizin, and oxymatrine are widely used to treat chronic hepatitis C virus infections in China. They are often prescribed in combination with ribavirin, which has a narrow therapeutic index. We investigated the influence of these compounds on ribavirin pharmacokinetics following concurrent administration at the human dose in rats. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in rats following oral (PO) administration of ribavirin (30 mg/kg) with or without silymarin (40 mg/kg, PO), glycyrrhizin (15 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [IP]), or oxymatrine (60 mg/kg, PO). Compared with the animals in ribavirin group, silymarin significantly decreased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-t ) and the peak plasma concentration (Cmax ) of ribavirin and ribavirin base by 31.2-44.5% and 48.9-50.0%, respectively. Glycyrrhizin significantly decreased the Cmax and AUC0-t of both ribavirin and its metabolite by 35.3-37.6% and 38.6-39.8%, respectively. However, silymarin or glycyrrhizin did not change the ribavirin metabolite/parent ratios of the AUC and Cmax . Oxymatrine did not induce significant changes in ribavirin concentration, but it significantly decreased the Cmax (26.6%) and AUC (21.8%) of the metabolite. This study indicates that the therapeutic efficacy of ribavirin may be compromised by the concurrent administration of herbal medicines/dietary supplements containing silymarin, glycyrrhizin, or oxymatrine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: In the organ or Corti, oxidative stress could result in damage to the hearing, and neural stem cells (NSCs) hold great therapeutic potential in treating hearing loss. Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) has been widely shown to exhibit anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in treatments of neural damage and disorder. Using hydrogen peroxide to induced oxidative stress as a model, we investigated the anti-oxidative role of GBE in isolated mouse cochlear NSCs. GBE treatment was found to significantly promote viability of NSCs, by markedly attenuating hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress. In addition, this anti-oxidative function of GBE was also able to prevent mitochondrial depolarization and subsequent apoptosis. Moreover, the anti-apoptotic role of GBE was mediated by antagonizing the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, where GBE could reverse the changes in key intrinsic apoptosis pathway factors including Bcl-2, Bax, and Caspase-3. Our data provided the first report on the beneficial role of GBE in protecting cochlear NSCs, by attenuating oxidative stress triggered intrinsic apoptosis, therefore supporting the potential therapeutic value of GBE in preventing oxidative stress-related hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Protocatechuic acid (PCA) plays a critical role in nutritional metabolism; it is a major metabolite of anthocyanins, which are flavonoids with a range of health benefits. PCA has a variety of biological activities including anti-oxidant, antiinflammatory, anti-apoptosis, and anti-microbial activities. However, the pharmacological effect of PCA, especially on osteoclastogenesis, remains unknown. We examined the effect of PCA on receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. PCA dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) and suppressed the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. At the molecular level, PCA suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of JNK among MAPKs only, without significantly affecting the early signaling pathway. PCA also suppressed RANKL-stimulated expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) at the mRNA and protein levels, without altering c-Fos mRNA expression. Additionally, PCA down-regulated the expression of downstream osteoclastogenesis-related genes including β3-integrin, DC-STAMP, OC-STAMP, Atp6v0d2, CTR, and CtsK. Mice treated with PCA efficiently recovered from lipopolysaccharide-induced bone loss in vivo. Thus, PCA inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and function by suppressing JNK signaling, c-Fos stability, and expression of osteoclastic marker genes. These results suggest that PCA could be useful in treatment of inflammatory bone disorders. Copyright
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Though arjunic acid, a triterpene isolated from Terminalia arjuna, was known to have antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and cytotoxic effects, its underlying antitumor mechanism still remains unclear so far. Thus, in the present study, the molecular antitumor mechanism of arjunic acid was examined in A549 and H460 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Arjunic acid exerted cytotoxicity by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and significantly increased sub-G1 population in A549 and H460 cells by cell cycle analysis. Consistently, arjunic acid cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activated Bax, and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and also attenuated the expression of pro-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 in A549 and H460 cells. Furthermore, arjunic acid upregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins such as IRE1 α, ATF4, p-eIF2α, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in A549 and H460 cells. Conversely, CHOP depletion attenuated the increase of sub-G1 population by arjunic acid, and also JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked the cytotoxicity and upregulation of IRE1 α and CHOP induced by arjunic acid in A549 and H460 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that arjunic acid induces apoptosis in NSCLC cells via JNK mediated ER stress pathway as a potent chemotherapeutic agent for NSCLC.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Sickness behaviour is a coordinated set of adaptive behavioural changes that develop in ill individuals during the course of an infection. It is relevant to understanding depression and some aspects of the suffering that in cancer. Embelin has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and anxiolytic assets and has been shown to inhibit NFκB pathway and cytokine production. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of embelin isolated from Embelia ribes Burm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sickness behaviour in mice. Adult male Swiss albino mice were pretreated with embelin (10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o.) or dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) for 3 days and then challenged with LPS (400 µg/kg, i.p.). At different time intervals of post LPS-challenge, sickness behaviour was evaluated in the animals by battery of behavioural tests (plus maze, open field, light-dark box, forced swim, social behaviour assessment, sucrose preference, and food and water intake). Levels of oxidative stress makers (reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation) in mice brain were also analysed. LPS-induced behavioural alterations, anhedonia and anorexia in mice. Pre-treatment with embelin attenuated behavioural changes induced by LPS. In addition, embelin prevented anhedonia, anorexia and ameliorated brain oxidative stress markers. The experimental outcomes of the present study demonstrated protective effect of embelin in LPS-induced sickness behaviour in mice.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is an active component of Carthamus tinctorius L., and we want to investigate whether HSYA attenuates pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin (BLM) in mice. The mice received a BLM via oropharyngeal aspiration, and HSYA was intraperitoneally injected. Arterial blood gas analysis was performed. Morphological changes and hydroxyproline content were measured. mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen I was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. α-SMA-positive cells in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining. A549 cell was cultured, and morphological changes were observed after TGF-β1 and HSYA treatment. mRNA expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Phosphorylation of Smad3 was evaluated by western blotting. HSYA decreased the lung consolidation area and collagen deposition in mice with pulmonary fibrosis. The blood gas changes due to BLM were attenuated by HSYA. HSYA also alleviated the BLM-induced increase of TGF-β1, connective tissue growth factor, α-SMA, and collagen I mRNA levels. HSYA treatment inhibited the increase of α-SMA expression, Smad3 phosphorylation, the morphological changes in lung tissue. HSYA inhibits Smad3 phosphorylation and elevated expression of collagen I mRNA in epithelial–mesenchymal transition induced by TGF-β1. Copyright
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: Tannic acid (TA) is a group of water-soluble polyphenolic compounds that occur mainly in plant-derived feeds, food grains and fruits. Many studies have explored its biomedical properties, such as anticancer, antibacterial, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiinflammatory and antihypertensive activities. However, the effects of TA on the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa-L ) of cardiomyocytes remain undefined. The present study examined the effects of TA on ICa-L using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular Ca(2+) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge detection system. Exposure to TA resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L , with the half maximal inhibitory concentration of 1.69 μM and the maximal inhibitory effect of 46.15%. Moreover, TA significantly inhibited the amplitude of myocyte shortening and peak value of Ca(2+) transient and increased the time to 10% of the peak. These findings provide new experimental evidence for the cellular mechanism of action of TA and may help to expand clinical treatments for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of boswellic acids (BA) and andrographolide (AD) on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of glyburide in normal as well as in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was studied. In normal and diabetic rats, the combination of glyburide with BA or AD increased significantly (p < 0.01) all the pharmacokinetic parameters, such as Cmax , AUC0-n , AUCtotal , t1/2 , and mean residence time, and decreased the clearance, Vd, markedly as compared with the control group. In rat liver, microsomes BA and AD have shown CYP3A4 inhibitory activity significantly (p < 0.01), compared with the vehicle group. The increase in hypoglycemic action by concomitant administration of glyburide with BA or AD was more in diabetic rats than when the drugs were used singly and with the control group, which suggests the enhancement of glucose reduction capacity of glyburide in diabetic rats along with BA or AD. In PK/PD modeling of BA and AD with glyburide, the predicted PK and PD parameters are in line with the observed PK and PD parameters. The results revealed that BA and AD led to the PK/PD changes because of glyburide-increased bioavailability and because of the inhibition of CYP3A4 enzyme. In conclusion, add-on preparations containing BA or AD may increase the bioavailability of glyburide, and hence the dose should be monitored. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Phytotherapy Research