Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis

Publisher: Georg Thieme Verlag

Journal Impact: 3.49*

*This value is calculated using ResearchGate data and is based on average citation counts from work published in this journal. The data used in the calculation may not be exhaustive.

Journal impact history

2016 Journal impact Available summer 2017
2015 Journal impact 3.49
2014 Journal impact 4.33
2013 Journal impact 3.81
2012 Journal impact 4.97
2011 Journal impact 5.38
2010 Journal impact 4.71
2009 Journal impact 3.34

Journal impact over time

Journal impact
Year

Additional details

Cited half-life 5.70
Immediacy index 2.32
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.97
ISSN 1098-9064
OCLC 163849709
Material type Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

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Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism (PAVTE) consists of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE) occurring during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. This condition is common and is a major source of morbidity in a population which is young and otherwise relatively healthy. Timely diagnosis and treatment are crucial in ensuring satisfactory patient outcomes. Diagnostic strategies for pregnancy-associated PE in particular require careful consideration of maternal and fetal risks. Low-molecular-weight heparins currently form the mainstay of treatment; however, there are uncertainties around optimal dosing of these agents in certain settings (e.g., obesity). This review discusses the diagnosis and suggested treatment of PAVTE. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · Sep 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Neonatal hemostasis differs qualitatively, but in particular quantitatively, from hemostasis in older children and adults. Nevertheless, hemostasis in healthy neonates is functionally stable with no tendency to bleeding or thrombotic complications. In sick neonates, however, risk factors may disrupt this equilibrium and lead to thrombosis. The most important risk factor is the central venous catheter. Management of neonatal central venous catheter thrombosis is challenging, as no controlled trials have been performed. Therapeutic options include (1) observation and supportive treatment; (2) anticoagulant agents, including low-molecular-weight heparin and unfractionated heparin; (3) thrombolytic agents; and (4) thrombectomy. Prevention of thrombosis with anticoagulation is not advised yet. Careful consideration of the necessity of the catheter and optimal hygienic care are important preventative measures. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · Sep 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • Article · Sep 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • Article · Aug 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Congenital afibrinogenemia (CA) is a disease characterized by a complex pathophysiology, involving both the procoagulant and fibrinolytic systems, as well as platelet activity. Although hemorrhagic diathesis represents the most frequent clinical presentation of this disorder, severe thrombotic events can occur. It is not yet clear if these events are strictly related to the disease itself or to the fibrinogen replacement therapy. Different hypotheses on the pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed. It is well known that fibrinogen/fibrin has a role in the downregulation of thrombin generation in plasma. In the absence of circulating fibrinogen, this "antithrombin" activity is missing and plasma thrombin levels rise; this excess of thrombin could promote clotting of the infused fibrinogen, initiating the thrombotic process. Furthermore, the observation of impaired plasmin generation in the plasma of CA patients has raised the hypothesis of a fibrinolytic system deficiency. We report the case of a CA male patient who at the age of 36 years experienced an arterial thrombosis in his left lower limb. Despite an aggressive medical treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin, fibrinolytic and antiplatelet agents, the arterial thrombosis progressed to the obstruction of the whole left arterial district and the patient underwent the amputation of the left lower limb. This case demonstrates the complexity of pathophysiology and clinical management of a "so-called" bleeding disorder as CA. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Although in most cases von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a mild disorder, a subgroup of patients experience frequent bleeding. In contrast to severe hemophilia in which prophylaxis is the accepted standard of care, this is less frequently used in VWD. Most type 1 VWD patients can be adequately managed with episodic desmopressin and tranexamic acid. In patients with more severe disease, especially those with type 3 VWD, joint bleeds, epistaxis, menorrhagia, and gastrointestinal bleeding are problematic and usually require treatment with von Willebrand factor/factor VIII (VWF/FVIII) concentrate. While in the past these patients were managed with on-demand VWF/FVIII concentrate, several recent reports have demonstrated the value of prophylactic treatment. Despite some uncertainties about the economic impact of treatment of severe VWD, prophylaxis with VWF concentrate should now be considered as the standard of care for the more severe end of the spectrum of affected individuals. The recent introduction of recombinant VWF concentrate is likely to improve the acceptability of prophylaxis in VWD. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • Article · Jun 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are highly effective for the primary and secondary prevention of arterial and venous thromboembolic events. However, patients treated with VKA have on average only 60% of their international normalized ratio (INR) values within the therapeutic range and INR instability is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and bleeding events. Recent evidence suggests that poor dietary vitamin K intake may affect anticoagulation control, but the role of vitamin K in INR stability remains to be established. We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the role of vitamin K dietary intake on the stability of VKA and the potential effect of daily vitamin K supplementation on VKA therapy. After a search in Medline and EMBASE databases, 15 studies for a total of 1,838 patients were included in our systematic review. Observational studies suggest an increased risk of unstable anticoagulation control in patients with lower daily vitamin K intake. On the other hand, the role of daily vitamin K supplementation or a diet with controlled vitamin K content in patients on VKA treatment remains to be established. Use of daily vitamin K supplementation may be associated with a clinically relevant increase in the time in therapeutic range in patients with unstable anticoagulation control. Conversely, this effect appears small and not clinically relevant when vitamin K was administered to an unselected population receiving VKA. Other large prospective studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary findings. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · May 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Strong experimental evidence indicates that components of the hemostatic system, including thrombin, exacerbate diverse features of experimental liver disease. Clinical studies have also begun to address this connection and some studies have suggested that anticoagulants can improve outcome in patients with liver disease. Among the evidence of coagulation cascade activation in models of liver injury and disease is the frequent observation of thrombin-driven hepatic fibrin(ogen) deposition. Indeed, hepatic fibrin(ogen) deposition has long been recognized as a consequence of hepatic injury. Although commonly inferred as pathologic due to protective effects of anticoagulants in mouse models, the role of fibrin(ogen) in acute liver injury and chronic liver disease may not be universally detrimental. The localization of hepatic fibrin(ogen) deposits within the liver is connected to the disease stimulus and in animal models of liver toxicity and chronic disease, fibrin(ogen) deposition may not always be synonymous with large vessel thrombosis. Here, we provide a balanced review of the experimental evidence supporting a direct connection between fibrin(ogen) and liver injury/disease pathogenesis, and suggest a path forward bridging experimental and clinical research to improve our knowledge on the nature and function of fibrin(ogen) in liver disease. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · May 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Long-term (or continuous) prophylaxis is generally accepted as the best form of treatment for patients with severe hemophilia A and B. Results of recent prospective, randomized clinical trials, as well as observational studies performed in the last decades, have provided strong and convincing evidence that continuous prophylaxis leads to reduction in the number of bleeding episodes, better joint status and improved health-related quality of life as compared with on-demand (or episodic) treatment. Nevertheless, many questions regarding long-term prophylaxis still remain open, for instance: when should prophylaxis be started (before or after the first joint bleeding), what is the optimal dosage to replace the missing factor, when should discontinuation of long-term prophylaxis be considered, what is the best way to measure the outcome of prophylaxis, etc. Moreover, there are numerous obstacles to widespread use of prophylactic therapy. The most challenging seem to be adequate venous access (particularly in younger patients) and patients' adherence. The crucial barrier to long-term prophylaxis is, however, the remarkably high cost of clotting factor concentrates. For most countries high-dose or intermediate-dose prophylaxis regimens are not affordable due to lack of economic resources. So, is continuous prophylaxis reserved exclusively for wealthy societies? Fortunately, there is an increasing body of evidence to suggest that low-dose prophylaxis offers significant benefits over on-demand treatment with comparable amounts of factor concentrate (and much lower amounts if compared with intermediate or high-dose prophylaxis regimens). The aim of this article is to discuss the clinical and economical aspects of continuous prophylaxis in hemophilia with emphasis on the low-dose regimens. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · Apr 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Bleeding assessment tools were first developed essentially as research tools, for the quantification of bleeding symptoms and the study of phenotype/genotype correlations. Interestingly, these tools have been proven useful also for clinicians diagnosing and treating bleeding disorders. The main advantage of these tools is the standardization of the diagnostic process, allowing the introduction of criteria with known specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of the most common mild bleeding disorders, particularly von Willebrand disease. This is important also for a rational approach to the laboratory diagnosis because for many mild bleeding disorders, a complex laboratory workup is required. Bleeding assessment tools should always be complemented by ancillary coagulation screening tests to exclude the presence of a bleeding disorder, however. Finally, bleeding severity assessed by such tools has been shown to correlate with the long-term probability of bleeding. Therefore, the bleeding assessment could become an important marker of disease severity. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · Apr 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: There are two main bioengineering approaches to extending the half-life of factor (F)VIII or FIX products used for hemophilia replacement therapy. These are fusion to Fc-immunoglobulin G (FVIII and FIX) or to albumin (FIX) or pegylation/glycopegylation (FVIII and FIX). Four FVIII and three FIX products are in clinical development or have recently been licensed in regions of the world. The reported half-life extension is approximately 1.5-fold for FVIII and 2.5-fold, or even longer, for FIX. Clinical trials have shown promising results with respect to extension of dose intervals and efficacy in the treatment and prevention of bleeding events. The role of these products in clinical practice has been discussed in terms of either improving convenience and adherence through prolongation of the interval between infusions or maintaining current intervals thereby increasing trough levels and the safety margin against bleeds. This review of extended half-life products addresses the possibilities and problems of their introduction in hemophilia treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · Apr 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Arterial and venous thromboses are major contributors to coagulation-associated morbidity and mortality. Greater understanding of mechanisms leading to thrombus formation and stability is expected to lead to improved treatment strategies. Factor XIII (FXIII) is a transglutaminase found in plasma and platelets. During thrombosis, activated FXIII cross-links fibrin and promotes thrombus stability. Recent studies have provided new information about FXIII activity during coagulation and its effects on clot composition and function. These findings reveal newly-recognized roles for FXIII in thrombosis. Herein, we review published literature on FXIII biology and effects on fibrin structure and stability, epidemiologic data associating FXIII with thrombosis, and evidence from animal models indicating FXIII has an essential role in determining thrombus stability, composition, and size. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · Apr 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Fibrinogen not only plays a pivotal role in hemostasis but also serves key roles in antimicrobial host defense. As a rapidly assembled provisional matrix protein, fibrin(ogen) can function as an early line of host protection by limiting bacterial growth, suppressing dissemination of microbes to distant sites, and mediating host bacterial killing. Fibrinogen-mediated host antimicrobial activity occurs predominantly through two general mechanisms, namely, fibrin matrices functioning as a protective barrier and fibrin(ogen) directly or indirectly driving host protective immune function. The potential of fibrin to limit bacterial infection and disease has been countered by numerous bacterial species evolving and maintaining virulence factors that engage hemostatic system components within vertebrate hosts. Bacterial factors have been isolated that simply bind fibrinogen or fibrin, promote fibrin polymer formation, or promote fibrin dissolution. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic gram-positive bacterium, the causative agent of a wide range of human infectious diseases, and a prime example of a pathogen exquisitely sensitive to host fibrinogen. Indeed, current data suggest fibrinogen serves as a context-dependent determinant of host defense or pathogen virulence in Staphylococcus infection whose ultimate contribution is dictated by the expression of S. aureus virulence factors, the path of infection, and the tissue microenvironment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    Article · Apr 2016 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis