Maternal and Child Health Journal (MATERN CHILD HLTH J)

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Journal description

Maternal and Child Health Journal is the first exclusive forum to advance the scientific and professional knowledge base of the maternal and child health (MCH) field. This quarterly provides peer-reviewed papers addressing the following areas of MCH practice policy and research: MCH epidemiology demography and health status assessment Innovative MCH service initiatives Implementation of MCH programs MCH policy analysis and advocacy MCH professional development. Exploring the full spectrum of the MCH field Maternal and Child Health Journal is an important tool for practitioners as well as academics in public health obstetrics gynecology prenatal medicine pediatrics and neonatology. Sponsors include the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) the Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health (ATMCH) and CityMatCH.

Current impact factor: 2.24

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 1.766

Additional details

5-year impact 2.38
Cited half-life 4.70
Immediacy index 0.28
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.80
Website Maternal and Child Health Journal website
Other titles Maternal and child health journal (Online)
ISSN 1092-7875
OCLC 45091969
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction The U.S. infant mortality rate has been steadily declining since 2007. Although the downward trend has been notable in Alaska since 2006 when the rate was 6.9 infant deaths per 1000 live births, a dramatic drop in infant mortality occurred in 2010 and 2011 when the infant mortality rate fell to 3.8 infant deaths per 1000 live births during both years. The purpose of this study was to investigate the sudden decrease in fetal and infant mortality rates (FIMR) using the perinatal periods of risk (PPOR) method, an approach that has not been used previously in Alaska. Methods The study was conducted for 251 fetal and infant deaths in 2004-2006, 265 deaths in 2007-2009, and 129 deaths in 2010-2011. Data were stratified by Alaska Native (AN) and White maternal race and urban/rural residence. Results Among both urban and rural White women, the rate ratios (RR) for FIMRs between the earlier and later time periods were not significantly different. The postneonatal mortality rate (PNMR) among AN infants living in rural areas decreased significantly (RR 0.40; 95 % confidence interval 0.21-0.76) between 2007-2009 and 2010-2011. An unexplained increase in sudden unexplained infant death was noted in 2009, followed by a precipitous decrease in 2010-2011. No other unusual distribution of the cause specific mortality rates was observed. Discussion The decrease in the Alaska Native FIMR might have been due to focused efforts for preventing postneonatal sleep associated deaths. Education for prevention of sleep related deaths, particularly in rural communities, is necessary to maintain Alaska's low PNMR.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives (1) To describe parents' report of special needs for children with ADHD on the Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) Screener; and (2) to assess the association between responses to Screener items and annual mental health and total health expenditures per child. Methods In pooled 2002-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) data, we identify children ages 4-17 years with ADHD. We use OLS and two-part regressions to model the relationship between CSHCN Screener items and mental health and total health expenditures. Based on these models we estimate adjusted, average total health expenditures for children with ADHD-both with and without a co-morbid mental health condition-and different combinations of endorsed Screener items. This research was conducted in accordance with prevailing ethical principles. Results There were 3883 observations on 2591 children with ADHD. Without a co-morbid mental health condition, average total expenditures per year from adjusted, model-based estimates were $865 for those meeting no Screener items, $2664 for those meeting only the medication item, $3595 for those meeting the medication and counseling items, and $4203 for those meeting the medication, counseling, and use of more health services items. Children with a co-morbid mental health condition had greater total health expenditures for each combination of Screener items. The associations between Screener items and mental health expenditures were similar, but with a slightly lower marginal effect of the medication item (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Conclusions Parents' responses on the CSHCN Screener are associated with meaningful variation in expenditures for children with ADHD. Though cross-sectional, this study suggests that the CSHCN Screener can be a useful categorization scheme for children with ADHD. It may be an efficient, standardized tool at the point of care for identifying children who need more resources and for targeting intensive interventions in the context of population health management.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose According to the Kaiser Family Foundation (2014), 502,866 (11.7 %) of Florida children under 19 years of age are uninsured, giving Florida the second largest number of uninsured children in the United States. Florida Covering Kids & Families (FL-CKF) is dedicated to developing innovative outreach methods for enrolling and retaining eligible children in Florida KidCare, the state's Children's Health Insurance Program. FL-CKF has developed a strong data system that allows it to evaluate the effectiveness and success of statewide enrollment and retention efforts. Description The data system was created using the Checkbox survey systems. Community and school outreach partners enter data each month on all completed Florida KidCare applications via a secure interface. The system requires data be entered in a uniform format and forces vital data points to be completed. These data are then transmitted to the state to obtain timely application determination information on enrollments. Assessment The data system helps FL-CKF to determine which outreach strategies are successful and where changes need to be made to increase effectiveness. The system also provides feedback to community outreach partners in order to enable follow up with families when needed. Conclusion Organizations helping uninsured children apply for health insurance may benefit from creating data collection systems to monitor project efficacy and modify outreach and enrollment strategies for greater effectiveness.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objective This study examined associations between mothers' and fathers' depressive symptoms and their parenting practices relating to gun, fire, and motor vehicle safety. Methods Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), a nationally representative sample of children birth to age five, linear probability models were used to examine associations between measures of parents' depressive symptoms and their use of firearms, smoke detectors, and motor vehicle restraints. Parents reported use of smoke detectors, motor vehicle restraints, and firearm ownership and storage. Results Results suggest mothers with moderate or severe depressive symptoms were 2 % points less likely to report that their child always sat in the back seat of the car, and 3 % points less likely to have at least one working smoke detector in the home. Fathers' depressive symptoms were associated with a lower likelihood of both owning a gun and of it being stored locked. Fathers' depressive symptoms amplified associations between mothers' depressive symptoms and owning a gun, such that having both parents exhibit depressive symptoms was associated with an increased likelihood of gun ownership of between 2 and 6 % points. Conclusions Interventions that identify and treat parental depression early may be effective in promoting appropriate safety behaviors among families with young children.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To compare certain preconception health (PCH) behaviors and conditions among US-born (USB) and foreign-born (FB) mothers in Los Angeles County (LAC), regardless of race/ethnicity, and to determine if any identified differences vary among Asian/Pacific Islanders (API's) and Hispanics. Methods Data are from the 2012 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby study (n = 6252). PCH behaviors included tobacco use, multivitamin use, unintended pregnancy, and contraception use. PCH conditions comprised being overweight/obese, diabetes, asthma, hypertension, gum disease, and anemia. The relationship between nativity and each PCH behavior/condition was assessed using multivariable logistic regression models. Results USB women were more likely than FB women to smoke (AOR 2.12, 95 % CI 1.49-3.00), be overweight/obese (AOR 1.57, 95 % CI 1.30-1.90), and have asthma (AOR 2.04, 95 % CI 1.35-3.09) prior to pregnancy. They were less likely than FB women to use contraception before pregnancy (AOR 0.59, 95 % CI 0.49-0.72). USB Hispanics and API's were more likely than their FB counterparts to be overweight/obese (AOR 1.57, 95 % CI 1.23-2.01 and AOR 2.37, 95 % CI 1.58-3.56, respectively) and less likely to use contraception (AOR 0.58, 95 % CI 0.45-0.74 and AOR 0.46, 95 % CI 0.30-0.71, respectively). USB Hispanic mothers were more likely than their FB counterparts to smoke (AOR 2.47, 95 % CI 1.46-4.17), not take multivitamins (AOR 1.30, 95 % CI 1.02-1.66), and have asthma (AOR 2.35, 95 % CI 1.32-4.21) before pregnancy. Conclusions US nativity is linked to negative PCH among LAC women, with many of these associations persisting among Hispanics and API's. As PCH profoundly impacts maternal and child health across the lifecourse, culturally-appropriate interventions that maintain positive behaviors among FB reproductive-aged women and encourage positive behaviors among USB women should be pursued.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Families, clinicians and policymakers desire improved delivery of health and related services for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). We analyzed factors associated with ease of use in obtaining such services. We also explored what were specific difficulties or delays in receiving services. By examining data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN 2009-2010) and using the revised criteria for "ease of use," we were able to assess the percentage of parents who reported that their experiences seeking services for their children met those criteria. Methods We performed Chi square tests to examine associations between the independent variables and their relationship to the difficulties or delays assessed in the survey; including: eligibility, availability of services, waiting lists, cost, and access to information. We used logistic regression to determine the association of meeting the "ease of use" criteria with socio-demographic, complexity of need, and access variables. Results Overall, a third of families of CSHCN (35.3 %) encounter difficulties, delays, or frustrations in obtaining health and related services. The lack of access to health and community services in this study fell most heavily on children from racial/ethnic minority backgrounds, those in poverty, and those with complex emotional/behavioral or developmental needs and functional limitations. Conclusions for Practice CSHCN require services from a broad array of providers across multiple systems. Unfortunately, there are certain difficulties that hamper the accessibility of these systems. These findings underscore the need for both practice-level response and systems-level reform to ensure equitable distribution of health and community resources.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Greater acculturation is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes in Mexican-American women, but the mechanisms by which acculturation influences perinatal outcomes are unclear. Pregnant acculturated Mexican-American women are more likely to engage in unhealthy prenatal behaviors relative to those less acculturated, including poor sleep. As sleep disruptions are associated with acculturation and negative perinatal outcomes, particularly maternal depression, alterations in sleep may adversely affect pregnant Mexican-American women. Methods Sixty pregnant women of Mexican descent completed surveys about sleep, acculturation, depressive symptoms and potential protective factor of social support. Results Acculturation, but not social support, significantly predicted increased sleep disruptions as well as overall feeling less refreshed upon waking across pregnancy. Moderation analysis indicated that more acculturated women who took longer to fall asleep reported increased depressive symptoms. Feeling refreshed upon waking also mediated the relationship between increased acculturation and elevated maternal depressive symptoms. Conclusions Acculturation and altered sleep contribute to greater risk in Mexican-American women for maternal depressive symptoms in the perinatal period. These findings have implications for prevention and treatment of maternal mental health disorders, which may adversely affect perinatal outcomes in the vulnerable Mexican-American population.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Iron deficiency is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency worldwide and a common medical condition in the United States. The American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended universal screening for iron deficiency anemia in infants at approximately 1 year of age. This screening involves invasive venous blood sampling which increases the clinic visit time and may cause significant stress to the patient and family members. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and utility of a non-invasive hemoglobin measurement device compared to standard laboratory hemoglobin measurement from venipuncture. Methods One hundred ten children were enrolled in the study following a well-child examination at San Antonio Military Medical Center from June 2012 to June 2014. Each child had a hemoglobin measurement obtained with the Masimo Pronto with Rainbow(®) R20L disposable sensor followed by venipuncture that was sent to the clinical laboratory for hemoglobin measurement. Paired hemoglobin results from the non-invasive device and the clinical laboratory were compared. Results Ninety-seven children successfully had hemoglobin measured by the Masimo Pronto device. Hemoglobin values obtained with the Masimo Pronto were significantly correlated with venous hemoglobin levels, with a correlation coefficient of 0.48. A hemoglobin level less than 11.5 gm/dL on the Masimo Pronto had a sensitivity of 82 % and a negative predictive value of 95 % when compared to venous hemoglobin level less than 11 gm/dL. Conclusions for Practice Non-invasive hemoglobin testing with the Masimo Pronto device may be a useful screening tool for anemia in infants that avoids invasive testing.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Background The primary purpose of this study was to determine the association between type of healthcare provider delivering prenatal care and intent to exclusively breastfeed. Methods A self-report survey was administered to 455 expectant mothers. Logistic regression was performed to determine the association between prenatal care provider type [obstetrician; other primary care physician (family doctor/general practitioner/internist/or other physician); midwife/nurse midwife; more than one provider; and other] with intent to breastfeed (exclusive/non-exclusive). Results Having a midwife/nurse midwife as a prenatal care provider was associated with intent to breastfeed compared to having an obstetrician (OR 2.544, 95 % CI 1.385-4.675). There was no difference in intent between women with another primary care physician and an obstetrician. Women with another type of health care provider, no prenatal care from a health professional, or no knowledge of who is providing prenatal care were less likely to intend to breastfeed (OR 0.228, CI 0.068-0.766) as compared to those with an obstetrician. Discussion/Conclusions Provider type is associated with intent to breastfeed among pregnant women. Women's intent to breastfeed is an important predictor of breastfeeding initiation, continuation, and duration that may be assessed by healthcare providers during the prenatal period. A consideration of what features of provider care are associated with improved breastfeeding outcomes and characteristics of women seeking prenatal care with midwives may serve to formulate future prenatal care policies and education during prenatal care visits.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To determine frequency of non-compliance with child care regulations among family day care homes (FDCH) and identify the role of income in compliance. Methods We analyzed non-compliance in 746 routine, unannounced inspection and re-inspection reports of FDCH collected by the Connecticut Department of Public Health licensing specialists in 2007-2008 and linked results to median income of zip code data. We grouped the 83 state regulations into 12 regulation categories, analyzed 11 categories, and used latent class analysis to classify each FDCH as high or low compliance for each category. We used logistic regression analysis to estimate the odds ratios of low compliance. Results Among the 746 FDCH inspections (594 first inspections and 152 re-inspections), we found high rates of non-compliance in inspection regulations in immunizations (32.9 %), water temperature (35.6 %) and hazards (30.0 %). Among the 11 regulation categories, 4 categories (indoor safety, emergency preparedness, child/family/staff documentation, and qualifications of provider) had regulations with high non-compliance. Median household income of FDCH zip code was lower for re-inspection sites than for inspection sites ($34,715 vs. $57,118, p < 0.0001) and FDCH in the lowest quartile of income had greater odds of low compliance in indoor safety (OR 1.86, 95 % CI 1.04, 3.35, p < 0.05). Conclusions The majority of FDCH were in compliance with the majority of regulations, yet there are glaring non-compliance issues in inspections and re-inspections and there are income-based inequities that place children at higher risk who are already at high risk for suboptimal health outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives The purpose of this research was to have ethnically diverse, 9- to 13-year-olds who live in urban, low-income households use Photovoice to represent their physical activity practices and their perception of their physical activity environment. Methods Photovoice methodology was used to allow children to capture their physical activity habits and environment through photographs and interviews. The Social Cognitive Theory was used as the theoretical framework. Heights and weights were taken for all children and BMI was calculated. Photographs were analyzed by recording the content of usable photos in SPSS software. Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts used the open coding method. Results Participants were 24 children (15 male, 9 female) living in inner city, low-income households. On average, children were 10.9 years old and the mean BMI-for-age percentile was 72 %. Children took a total of 377 pictures and 339 of these were usable. Three themes were identified across interviews and photographs, (a) types of activity, (b) social environment, and (c) physical environment where activity took place. Conclusions for Practice This study provides insight into low-income, urban children's physical activity habits and environment using a novel approach. Potential ways to increase moderate to high intensity activity among this population are to involve church-based organizations, create more safe places to play by increasing green space in urban areas, and to provide financial support for after-school programs and community centers.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Positive deviance research seeks out well-nourished children living in disadvantaged contexts to understand local growth-promoting behaviors. This study explored the factors that influence the uptake of infant and young child feeding behaviors among mothers. Methods Children with a height-for-age z-score (HAZ) > 0 (n = 10) or a HAZ < -2.0 (n = 12) were purposefully selected from households enrolled in a community management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) program in an urban slum of Mumbai, India. Qualitative methods were employed by means of semi-structured key informant interviews with positive and non-positive deviant mothers. Eligibility was restricted to households with limited resources and more than one child. A 24-h dietary recall and anthropometric measurements were taken for the index child. An observation checklist assessed household hygiene. Data analysis was based on the Grounded Theory of qualitative research. Results Positive deviant mothers (those with children with a HAZ > 0) largely exhibited optimal infant and young child feeding practices explained by maternal information seeking behaviors; mothers acknowledging the importance of maternal health; and social support. The relationship between mother and health worker seemed to influence how well they listened to the health workers' recommendations. Across all households, the daily consumption of high-energy, processed foods was apparent. Conclusions Practical considerations include exploring how to tailor CMAM programs to include social support and counseling training for health workers to engage more closely with mothers; exploring the feasibility of a women's social group for mothers to share information on child rearing; and teaching mothers about healthy eating and the link between nutrition and health.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess the risk for neurodevelopmental delays for children of mothers who were obese (≥200 pounds) prior to pregnancy, and to characterize delays associated with maternal obesity among children referred to and found eligible to receive Early Intervention Program services. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study (N = 541,816) using a population-based New York City data warehouse with linked birth and Early Intervention data. Risks for children suspected of a delay and 'significantly delayed', with two moderate or one severe delay, were calculated. Among the group of children eligible by delay for Early Intervention, analyses assessed risk for being identified with a moderate-to-severe delay across each of five functional domains as well as risks for multiple delays. Results: Children of mothers who were obese were more likely to be suspected of a delay (adjusted RR 1.19 [CI 1.15-1.22]) and borderline association for 'significantly delayed' (adjusted RR 1.01 [CI 1.00-1.02). Among children eligible by delay, children of mothers who were obese evidenced an increased risk for moderate-to-severe cognitive (adjusted RR 1.04 [CI 1.02-1.07]) and physical (adjusted RR 1.04 [CI 1.01-1.08]) delays and for global developmental delay (adjusted RR 1.05 [CI 1.01-1.08]). Conclusion: Maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of developmental delay in offspring. Among children with moderate or severe delays, maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of cognitive and physical delays as well as with increased risk for global developmental delay. While causation remains uncertain, this adds to the growing body of research reporting an association between maternal obesity and neurodevelopmental delays in offspring.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with myriad health conditions and risk behaviors in both adolescents and adults. In this study we examine the association between ACEs and specific physical, mental, and developmental conditions, as well as their comorbidity, in a nationally representative sample of children 0-17 years. Methods Data from the 2011-2012 National Survey for Child Health (NSCH) were used. A total of 95,677 random-digit-dial interviews with parents of children 0-17 years were conducted across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Outcomes included singular condition domains (physical, mental, and developmental) as well as combinations of condition domains (e.g., physical plus mental, mental plus developmental, etc.). Results Twenty-three percent of parents reported that their child experienced 1 ACE; 9.2 % experienced 2 ACEs, and 10.3 % experienced three or more. Across all three condition domains and combinations of domains, children who experienced at least one ACE were more likely than children who experienced 0 ACEs to have at least one condition. Additionally, greater ACEs was associated with increased likelihood of at least one condition in each domain and in multiple domains. Conclusions for practice These findings support the extension of existing family environment screening tools in pediatric practices as well as the establishment of a system for monitoring ACEs in families with multiple or complex conditions.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Maternal and Child Health Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Background Maternity leave is integral to postpartum maternal and child health, providing necessary time to heal and bond following birth. However, the relationship between maternity leave and health outcomes has not been formally and comprehensively assessed to guide public health research and policy in this area. This review aims to address this gap by investigating both the correlates of maternity leave utilization in the US and the related health benefits for mother and child. Methods We searched the peer-reviewed scholarly literature using six databases for the years 1990 to early 2015 and identified 37 studies to be included in the review. We extracted key data for each of the included studies and assessed study quality using the "Weight of the Evidence" approach. Results The literature generally confirms a positive, though limited correlation between maternity leave coverage and utilization. Likewise, longer maternity leaves are associated with improved breastfeeding intentions and rates of initiation, duration and predominance as well as improved maternal mental health and early childhood outcomes. However, the literature points to important disparities in access to maternity leave that carry over into health outcomes, such as breastfeeding. Synthesis We present a conceptual framework synthesizing what is known to date related to maternity leave access and health outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Maternal and Child Health Journal