Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science (Meas Phys Educ Exerc Sci)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

This journal exists that covers a wide variety of subjects in the area of measurement research in physical education and exercise science. Each journal section is devoted to theoretical and methodological issues in measurement and statistics. Theoretical/Issues--contains articles pertaining to theoretical development in measurement and statistics in physical education and exercise science. Methodological--contains empirical investigation of measurement and statistical tools used within physical education and exercise science. Tutorials--includes articles on how to appropriately use new or existing measurement procedures as well as information on the appropriate use of statistical techniques. Applied Research--includes validity, reliability, and objectivity studies of selected instruments from physical education and exercise science. Test/Instrument Development--includes research designed to develop skill tests, fitness tests, psychological tests, competency based tests, equipment or any other test or test procedure with application to physical education and exercise science. Evaluation--includes articles relating to grading, norming, standards, and performance assessment in physical education and exercise science. Teacher's Toolbox--contains articles on how to teach courses in measurement including various teaching methods, successful laboratory experiences, helpful assignments, and adaptations to various student needs. Computer Software Development--features software writers' submissions of one-page descriptions of their software. The author explains the purpose of the software and provides directions and how the software may be obtained. Reviews--gives the latest reviews and article abstracts pertaining to testing, measurement, evaluation, and statistics. This section also contains a summary of measurement research in other journals. Commentary--contains position statements and commentary relating to testing, measurement, evaluation, and statistics within physical education and exercise science. Every quarterly issue presents a wide array of measurement and evaluation topics. The journal is essential reading for anyone who has a use for quality measurement information in the fields of physical education and exercise science. As a peer-reviewed publication, Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science is absolutely devoted to bringing the best research, test development, evaluation, and so much more.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science website
Other titles Measurement in physical education and exercise science (Online), Measurement in physical education and exercise science
ISSN 1091-367X
OCLC 45007135
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The psychometric properties of the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R), the Sport Confidence Inventory (SCI), and the Carolina SCI (CSCI) were examined in a study involving 260 athletes. The study aimed to test the dimensional structure, convergent and divergent validity, and invariance over competition level of scores generated by these instruments. Exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) supported the measurement models for the SCI and CSCI but favoured a two-dimensional model for the LOT-R. ESEM analyses of the total pool of 33 items indicated satisfactory divergent validity among these optimism and sport confidence measures with the only overlap occurring between the LOT-R and CSCI measures of optimism. The SCI discriminated among athletes participating at different competitive levels and emerged as the most suitable instrument for measuring individual differences in sport confidence. The CSCI emerged as a better measure of optimism in a sporting context than the more general LOT-R.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science
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    ABSTRACT: The multi-dimensionality of Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP) has been acknowledged by the use of correlated-factor model and second-order model. In this study, the authors critically endorse the bifactor model, as a substitute to address the multi-dimensionality of PSPP. To cross-validate the models, analyses are conducted first in exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) framework with a randomly selected subsample and then in confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) framework with a second subsample. Results from both ESEM and CFA analyses suggest that bifactor model is the best-fitted model. A general physical self-esteem factor and four domain specific factors are identified with the bifactor model. Coefficient omega hierarchical of the general factor is .86. The (Formula presented.) of the specific factors are .19, .20, .59, and .29, respectively. Gender difference at both general factor level and domain specific factor level is examined within the bifactor model. Discussions of the use and limitations of bifactor model as well as ESEM are provided.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science
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    ABSTRACT: Dyadic interactions generate direct relationships in which interdependent sport behaviors can be destructured. The focus of this investigation was to develop a two-level performance framework and corresponding measures of individual- and dyad-level sport performance. The described procedures surrounded a male–female cheerleading paired-stunt task, as only team-level outcomes are currently assessed during sport competition. Multiple observers employed the developed measures (α = .89–.96; interclass correlation = .87–.95) to assess the videoed performance of 132 individuals within 66 intact dyads competing at a national competition. Unique information is revealed from each partner’s individual-level score, disjointedly assessed, and their dyad-level score, an assessment of combined efforts. Score differences are especially apparent when in contrast to an aggregated dyad-level score. A discussion of the outlined approach and interpretation of multilevel occurrences of interdependent processes and outcomes of sporting performance is provided.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the psychometric properties of the Perceived Health Outcomes of Recreation Scale (PHORS). Data for PHORS were collected from three different trail sites (Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail, and First Landing State Park) during three separate time periods, allowing for cross-validation and invariance testing. Exploratory factor analyses, confirmatory factor analyses, and invariance testing procedures were conducted. The results indicate that PHORS, with 13 items across three underlying factors, showed high reliability and strong evidences of validity. Full configural and metric invariance indicated the factor loading pattern. The measurement properties of PHORS were generally invariant across recreation participants using different trails, situating PHORS as a potential instrument that can be used in various outdoor recreation trail settings.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science
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    ABSTRACT: An age and body mass handicap has been previously developed and validated for the 5-kilometer (5K) run. The purpose of this study was to develop a similar handicap for the marathon but with a different age adjustment based on deviations from age group world best marathon times within each sex. The resulting handicap allowed finish time comparisons between marathoners of different age and body mass within the same sex. Applied to the top 15 men and women overall and top 10 in each age group of a recent marathon, age bias was reduced by 99.3% and 98.5% for women and men, respectively. This age and body mass handicap appears valid based on empirical analyses for age and extrapolation from empirical data at the 5-km distance for body mass. The marathon body mass handicap should be empirically evaluated in future research.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science
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    ABSTRACT: The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n = 759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n = 1,798) supported this assertion. However, a bifactor analysis simultaneously estimating factor loadings on a general factor and two subfactors (Emotional Issues and External Influences) indicated that the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale is best interpreted using the general factor and subfactors together. Additionally, structural equation models (n = 2,294) relating exercise self-efficacy and completed exercise support the assertion that a bifactor model provides the most accurate information. This study is the first to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale using common factor analysis and bifactor techniques and provides evidence for the use of general factor and subfactors.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science

  • No preview · Article · May 2015 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to examine the validity and reliability of an instrument designed to measure student perceptions of curricular goals in physical education, the Curricular Goals in Physical Education Questionnaire. Participants were 879 Finnish students from grades 7 to 9 (412 girls, 467 boys; mean age 13.81). An exploratory factor analysis was performed on Sample 1 (n = 287), revealing a four-factor solution and suggesting that factor structure be cross-validated with confirmatory factor analysis in Sample 2 (n = 592). Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated an acceptable fit and supported the four-factor model. Tests for gender invariance supported configural, metric, and scalar invariance. Analyses of factor mean differences indicated that girls attributed more importance than boys to physical education’s health-related goals, social and emotional learning, and motor skill development. This study confirmed the validity of the Curricular Goals in Physical Education Questionnaire to assess student perspectives on curricular goals across gender. In order to improve factor structure the authors suggest the addition of an item measuring skill acquisition to future versions of the instrument.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science

  • No preview · Article · May 2015 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science
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    ABSTRACT: The current study aims to test the reliability and validity of the Leader–Member Exchange (LMX 7) scale with regard to coach–player relationships in sports settings. A total of 330 professional soccer players from the Turkish Super League as well as from the First and Second Leagues participated in this study. Factor analyses were performed to test the construct validity of the LMX 7. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a one-factor solution for the LMX 7. Confirmatory factor analysis showed acceptable fit indices (χ2(14) = 31.36; p = .001; χ2/df = 2.24; GFI = .95; CFI = .97; SRMR = .05). Cronbach`s alpha (α = .84) and construct reliability (CR = .85) indicated that the reliability of the LMX 7 was quite good. Factorial Invariance (Δχ2diff = 4.49; p > .05) across samples provided cross-validation using Multi-Group Confirmatory Analysis (MGCFA). The MGCFA supported the model of league invariance. Evidence of cross validation and configural, metric, and scalar invariance tests suggested that the LMX 7 scale preserves its factor structure, factor loadings, factor variances, and item uniqueness equally well. Chi-square difference tests revealed full invariance (Δχ2(6) = 11.45; p > .05) and partial scalar invariance (Δχ2(6) = 9.46; p > .05). Overall, these results show that the LMX 7 scale is reliable and valid for examining coach–player relationships.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science