Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science (J Dance Med Sci)

Publisher: International Association for Dance Medicine & Science

Journal description

Each issue focuses on bringing you the current results of clinical and experimental research. The aim of the Journal of Dance Medicine & Science is to provide you with one source for up-to-date information. Featured articles are drawn from the fields of:

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Website Journal of Dance Medicine and Science website
Other titles Journal of dance medicine & science (Online), Dance medicine & science, Journal of dance medicine and science
ISSN 1089-313X
OCLC 61314134
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to provide an epidemiological review of the literature concerning ballet injuries affecting pre-professional ballet dancers. The literature search was limited to published peer-reviewed reports and involved an extensive examination of Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL. The following search terms were used in various combinations: ballet, injury, epidemiology, risk factor, pre-professional, and intervention. Additional citations were located using the ancestry approach. Unlike some other athletic activities that have been the focus of recent intervention research, there is a paucity of intervention and translational research in pre-professional ballet, and sample sizes have often been small and have not accounted for the multivariate nature of ballet injury. Exposure-based injury rates in this population appear similar to those reported for professional ballet dancers and female gymnasts. A preponderance of injuries affect the lower extremity of these dancers, with sprains and strains being the most frequent type of injury reported. The majority of injuries appear to be overuse in nature. Injury risk factors have been tested in multiple studies and indicate a variety of potential injury predictors that may provide useful guidance for future research.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
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    ABSTRACT: The Perceived Motivational Climate in Sport Questionnaire-2 (PMCSQ-2) adapted for dance has been employed in a variety of dance settings. However, the content validity of the measure and the relevance of particular subscales (e.g., Intra-Team Member Rivalry) have been questioned. Thus, the aims of this study were twofold: first, to examine the content validity of the PMCSQ-2 and identify problematic items and the nature and frequency of such problems experienced by dancers completing the measure; and second, to determine whether the content of task-involving and ego-involving climates, as captured in the subscales of the PMCSQ-2, are relevant and meaningful in dance contexts. Think aloud interviews were conducted with 21 dancers (10 male, 11 female) representing diverse types and levels of dance experience. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and segmented into text related to each item in the PMCSQ-2. Each participant's responses were individually analyzed, with the nature and frequency of problems encountered recorded in relation to five potential causes: errors in understanding, interpretation, retrieval, judgment, and responding. Think aloud interviews revealed that 72% of the participant responses presented no problem, indicating that the measure has an acceptable degree of content validity. However, the findings highlight a number of potentially problematic areas that warrant further attention. Implications for the interpretation of previous research and the conduct of future research employing the PMCSQ-2 in dance as well as other achievement contexts (e.g., sport) are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic Lisfranc injury is a subtle and severe injury in high-level athletes, including dancers. This patient population is generally intolerant of intra-articular screw fixation and can develop significant post-traumatic arthritis with potentially career ending complications. Flexible fixation with suture-button devices provides potential restoration of physiologic motion at the joint, with appropriate support for healing that may facilitate return to en pointe activities for dancers. We hypothesized that the suture-button device would restore motion at the Lisfranc joint and allow for return to activities in this particular population without the limitations and complications of rigid fixation. We operated on seven dancers and high-level athletes with diagnosed Lisfranc injuries by installing a suture-button device. All patients had failed conservative management after late presentation. They were allowed to return to sport in 6 months, preoperative and postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Score (AOFAS) foot scores were obtained, and patients were followed for a minimum of 15 months. All seven returned to full activities in 6 months, with radiographic evidence of fixation and no complications to date. AOFAS foot scores improved from an average of 65 preoperatively to an average of 97 postoperatively at latest follow-up. It is concluded that flexible fixation with suture-button type device represents a viable alternative to screw fixation or fusion that may allow dancers and athletes to return to previous levels of activity after Lisfranc injury. This case series represents to our knowledge the first application of this device to a unique population that requires flexibility at the Lisfranc joint for performance.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
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    ABSTRACT: Neuroimaging and behavioral studies have indicated that expertise in dance is associated with differences in the visual processing of dance movements. This study sought to determine if dance expertise was also associated with the ability to recognize visual differences between dance movements. Participants (20 dancers and 20 non-dancers) watched pairs of video clips showing dance phrases. Within each pair of phrases a manipulation was made to a single movement in the categories of shape (25%), time (25%), or space (25%), or there was no manipulation made between the two videos (25%). After viewing each pair, participants used pencil and paper to indicate if they observed a difference between the phrases and, if so, in which category. Group differences were compared for each category with four separate t-tests. Results showed that dancers were better at recognizing manipulations of space, time, and trials with no change but did not differ from non-dancers at recognizing manipulations of shape. Results are discussed in reference to the tested hypothesis that the ability and experience to produce an action is associated with enhanced perception of similar actions.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
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    ABSTRACT: A 26-year-old female professional dancer sustained an acute injury to her mid-foot during a performance of The Nutcracker. An intra-articular, comminuted, minimally displaced fracture of the cuboid was found. The patient was treated non-operatively with cast and boot immobilization, modified weightbearing, and progressive rehabilitation. She was able to return to professional dance at 6 months post-injury and continues to dance professionally over 1 year out from injury without issue. The unique demands of classical ballet, especially dancing en pointe, increase the risk for mid-foot fractures, and clinicians should have a high-index of suspicion in dancers suffering an acute injury to the foot and ankle with greater than expected pain or swelling. Multiple imaging modalities can be used to make the diagnosis, to include plain film radiographs, MRI, and CT scan. Fracture characteristics and patient-specific factors should be taken into account when deciding on a treatment plan.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dancers may compensate alignment at the spine, hip, knees, ankles, and feet to achieve a greater turnout than is available at the hip alone. Such compensations are believed to lead to many of the musculoskeletal injuries experienced by dancers, especially overuse injuries. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between compensated turnout and injury of the lower extremities and low back. Twenty-two university level modern dancers age 19 to 23 participated. Measurements were taken of active hip external rotation (AHER) prone and functional turnout (FTO) in first position. The difference between FTO and AHER was designated as compensated turnout (CTO). A questionnaire was conducted to gather information about dancers' injuries within the past 2 years. A total of 17 participants (77%) reported experiencing at least one injury in the 24 month period. All dancers compensated turnout. Results revealed a large variability in CTO among participants, ranging from 3° to 72°. Statistical analysis showed a significant relationship (r = 0.45, N = 22, p = 0.04) between CTO and the number of injuries experienced, especially as related to low back pain (r = 0.50, N = 22, p = 0.02). Students with no injury had a CTO mean of 26°, while those with two or more injuries had a CTO mean of 43°. Results contribute to previous studies that have examined the effects of CTO in ballet dancers and further indicate that compensatory patterns of turnout may increase the risk of experiencing more than one injury in university level modern dancers.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present the case of a 14-year-old pre-professional ballerina that demonstrates common features of two conditions affecting the midfoot that are often missed or subject to delay in diagnosis in such young athletes: 1. stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal, and 2. sprain of the Lisfranc joint complex. While these represent potentially career-altering injuries in the professional dancer, this case demonstrates that a high index of clinical suspicion, careful physical exam, appropriate radiographic assessment, and prompt treatment are essential to achieving the best possible outcome.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
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    ABSTRACT: Ganglion cysts are common benign masses, usually occurring in the hands and feet. This report describes the case of a young female Irish dancer who presented with paresthesia of her foot due to a ganglion in near proximity to the superficial peroneal nerve. Midfoot ganglia in young girls engaged in Irish dance can limit their ability to participate. This pathology requires further epidemiological studies to investigate its prevalence. In the event of failed conservative management, surgical intervention to excise the cyst and decompress the nerve is an effective treatment to facilitate return to dancing.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
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    ABSTRACT: Lack of alignment between the lowerlimb structures, such as the hips, knees, and longitudinal arches of the feet, has been described as an important predisposing factor in musculoskeletal injury among classical ballet dancers. However, no studies were found that analyzed basic ballet movements with quantification of objective criteria of the movements. The purposes of this study were: 1. to establish a methodology to quantify, using kinematic evaluation, the technical criteria that guide the correct execution of all phases of the plié (simultaneous flexion of the hips, knees, and ankle joints); and 2. to explore whether experienced ballet dancers respect those criteria when performing the plié. The technical criteria considered were the following: 1. midfoot stability; 2. pelvic positioning in a neutral alignment; 3. pelvic stability, represented by pelvic angle variation; and 4. vertical alignment of the knee joint with the second toe of the ipsilateral foot. Twenty dancers from Porto Alegre, Brazil, with 18 years of uninterrupted ballet training, were filmed while performing plié using four synchronized cameras. The descriptive statistical analysis involved calculating the median, minimum, and maximum of each of the technical criteria. Results showed that for criterion 1, the 20 dancers showed great stabilization of the midfoot; for criteria 2 and 3, 18 dancers displayed pelvic instability tending toward retroversion throughout execution of the plié; and for criterion 4, 13 dancers presented with medial misalignment of the knees at all phases of the plié. Using these criteria, it was possible to characterize the plié from a kinematic point of view.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
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    ABSTRACT: Atrophy of the stabilizing muscles of the hip, such as quadratus femoris (QF), may predispose the hip joint to dysfunction. Ultrasound imaging (USI) has been shown to be a valid and reliable method of measuring the size of several hip muscles, but QF size has not been investigated. The objectives of this study were to establish the criterion validity of USI against the “gold standard” magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for measuring the QF cross-sectional area (CSA) and to investigate intra-rater reliability of USI. Eleven current or retired professional ballet dancers (six women, five men) volunteered for USI of their QF within 1 week of MRI. The mean CSAs of QF were compared between the two imaging modalities, and the mean USI CSAs from two different trials were compared. Mean CSA with MRI (4.8 cm2, ± 1.54) was significantly larger than mean CSA with USI (4.29 cm2 ± 1.56; t = 5.82; p < 0.001), and the mean difference was 0.41 cm² (9%). However, the measures were highly correlated for intra-class reliability (r = 0.96, p < 0.001), and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) demonstrated excellent agreement (ICC = 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.20 -0.97) and consistency of measures (ICC = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.90- 0.98). Intra-rater reliability of measuring QF with USI was excellent between two trials (ICC = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96- 0.99). The minimal detectable change at a 95% CI (MDC95) was 0.38 cm2 (9.5%). It is concluded that USI is a valid and reliable measure of QF muscle size and can be used to measure QF CSA in a research or clinical setting.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science