Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) (J REFRACT SURG)

Publisher: International Society of Refractive Surgery, Slack

Journal description

The Journal of Refractive Surgery, the official publication of the International Society of Refractive Surgery and its affiliated societies, is a bimonthly forum for original research, review, and evaluation of refractive and corneal surgical procedures. In addition to peer-reviewed scientific articles, regular features such as New Ideas, Case Reports, Consultations in Refractive Surgery, New Commentary, Abstracts, and Opinions help keep the surgeon abreast of this ever-changing specialty.

Current impact factor: 3.47

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 3.468
2013 Impact Factor 2.781
2012 Impact Factor 2.474
2011 Impact Factor 2.541
2010 Impact Factor 2.491
2009 Impact Factor 2.32
2008 Impact Factor 1.914
2007 Impact Factor 1.696
2006 Impact Factor 2.097
2005 Impact Factor 1.948
2004 Impact Factor 2.399
2003 Impact Factor 1.877
2002 Impact Factor 2.307
2001 Impact Factor 1.995
2000 Impact Factor 2.061
1999 Impact Factor 1.847
1996 Impact Factor 1.224

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.15
Cited half-life 5.70
Immediacy index 0.57
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.94
Website Journal of Refractive Surgery website
Other titles Journal of refractive surgery
ISSN 1081-597X
OCLC 56970461
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Slack

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On Institutional Repositories
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • NIH authors may deposit in PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher last reviewed on 21/04/2015
  • Classification
    white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate patients with keratoconus who manifested progression after in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. Methods: Patients with keratoconus who received IVF treatment were included in this study. None of the patients became pregnant as a result of the IVF treatment. Progression of keratoconus was determined by changes in corrected distance visual acuity and/or topographic changes and subjective assessments. Results: Three patients with keratoconus received IVF treatment and keratoconus progression was detected in all 6 eyes of the patients. The mean age of the patients was 32.3 ± 3.6 years (range: 28 to 36 years) and the mean follow-up duration was 15.6 ± 3.2 months (range: 12 to 18 months). The mean and the maximum keratometry values increased and corrected distance visual acuity decreased after 2.3 IVF treatments. Conclusions: Drugs used in IVF treatment increase estrogen levels, which may affect corneal biomechanics and induce progression of keratoconus. Corneal cross-linking treatment could be offered to minimize the risk of keratoconus progression before IVF treatment. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(1):60-63.].
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To determine the effect of lens position and corneal curvature on the near focal point of different multifocal intraocular lenses. Methods: Near focal points for various multifocal intraocular lenses were calculated using a refractive vergence formula. Median, high, and low values for lens position and corneal curvature were used. Results: Lens position and corneal curvature both affected the theoretical near point of multifocal intraocular lenses. The effect was more pronounced for lower power adds. There was overlap of near focal points for the different near adds of the Tecnis multifocal lenses (AMO, Abbott Park, IL) across the range of lens positions and corneal curvatures seen in a normal population. Conclusions: Clinicians need to be aware of the effect of lens position and corneal curvature on the near focal point of intraocular lenses. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(1):64-66.].
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate total corneal thickness and corneal layers in healthy young adults using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and to describe its repeatability and reproducibility. Methods: Eighty-six eyes from 86 healthy volunteers were prospectively and consecutively enrolled. Manual measurements of central corneal thickness (CCT) and central thickness of epithelium, Bowman's layer, stroma, and the Descemet-endothelium complex were performed using Spectralis OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). To assess the reliability of the repeated measurements, intraclass correlation coefficients and coefficients of variation were used. Results: Mean CCT, epithelium, Bowman's layer, stroma, and Descemet-endothelium values were 555.50 ± 29.64, 54.60 ± 4.25, 16.70 ± 1.73, 467.51 ± 28.91, and 16.74 ± 1.66 µm, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.746 (Bowman's layer) to 0.999 (CCT and stroma) and from 0.483 (Bowman's layer) to 0.995 (CCT) and 0.998 (stroma) for intraobserver repeatability and interobserver reproducibility, respectively. The measurements showed coefficients of variation lower than 11% in all cases. Conclusions: This study establishes a normal database for corneal thickness and all its layers in healthy young adults with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. This device exhibited a high degree of intraobserver repeatability and interobserver reproducibility for all regions except Bowman's layer. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(1):27-32.].
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate corneal higher order aberrations after LASIK for the correction of high hyperopia using a 500-Hz excimer laser and optimized ablation profile. Methods: Retrospective consecutive study including 51 eyes of 28 patients (age range: 21 to 54 years) with high hyperopia or hyperopic astigmatism (sphere ≥ 5.00 diopters). All cases underwent LASIK using the sixth generation Amaris excimer laser (SCHWIND eye-tech-solutions, Kleinostheim, Germany) and a femtosecond laser platform for flap creation. Postoperative changes in corneal higher order aberrations for the 4-, 5-, and 6-mm pupil diameters and corneal asphericity for 4.5 and 8 mm were represented at the end of the 6-month follow-up. Results: A significant increase in corneal root mean square higher order, spherical, and coma aberrations was observed 6 months after surgery (P < .01). Corneal asphericity for the 4.5-mm (Q45) and 8-mm (Q8) corneal diameter also changed significantly during the postoperative period (P < .01). Strehl ratio change was not statistically significant (P = .77). Conclusions: Correction of high hyperopia with LASIK significantly induces corneal higher order aberrations regardless of the physiologic level of photopic and mesopic pupil conditions. [J Refract Surg. 2016(1);6-13.].
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate the effect of corneal cross-linking (CXL) in progressive keratoconus by applying in vivo static and dynamic Scheimpflug analyses. Methods: In this longitudinal retrospective study, corneal topography and tomography (Pentacam HD) and dynamic Scheimpflug-based biomechanical analyses (CorvisST [CST]) of 24 eyes of 24 patients with progressive keratoconus before and 6 months after CXL were reviewed. New dynamic curve analyses, provided by Oculus Optikgeräte, were performed to analyze corneal dynamics throughout the entire response to the CST air puff impulse. Results: Besides subtle changes of topography and tomography, only the CorvisST predefined parameters peak distance (-0.5 mm) and radius of the intended cornea (+0.5 mm; P < .05) demonstrated statistically significant differences 6 months after CXL. Using new dynamic curve analyses, additional distinct changes of the corneal biomechanical characteristics after CXL were noted. Conclusions: Published results of corneal biomechanical changes after CXL for progressive keratoconus based on single, predefined CST parameters are inconsistent. The new dynamic curve analyses demonstrate distinct changes of the biomechanical properties of the cornea and might therefore be the next step in understanding in vivo analyses of corneal biomechanics. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(1):34-39.].
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To report the 1-year outcomes of LASIK in patients with previous radial keratotomy using a novel femtosecond laser platform. Methods: The charts of 27 eyes of 18 patients who underwent femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK with the WaveLight FS200 laser (Alcon Laboratories, Inc., Fort Worth, TX) for consecutive hyperopia following previous radial keratotomy were retrospectively reviewed at a single private practice location. The preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative results were evaluated. Results: All 27 eyes had successful femtosecond laser flap creation without significant intraoperative or postoperative complications. Uncorrected visual acuity significantly improved postoperatively to 0.13 ± 0.13 logMAR at 12 months of follow-up (P < .0001). Postoperative spherical equivalent averaged 0.11 ± 0.53 diopters. None of the patients lost any lines of corrected distance visual acuity during the postoperative period. Conclusions: The femtosecond laser technique described by this study resulted in a safe and effective way to deliver LASIK following previous radial keratotomy. Future investigations are needed to further validate the outcomes of this study. [J Refract Surg. 2016:32(1):15-19.].
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate the changes in corneal backward light scattering, as measured by a rotating Scheimpflug camera with automated corneal densitometry software, in eyes treated with femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK (FS-LASIK). Methods: The cornea was examined preoperatively and postoperatively at 1 day, 1 week, and 1, 3, and 6 months in 23 patients who underwent myopic FS-LASIK. Local analysis of corneal backscatter was performed on four concentric radial zones across a 12-mm diameter (0 to 2, 2 to 6, 6 to 10, and 10 to 12 mm) and at a different corneal depth (anterior 120 µm, central and posterior 60 µm). Results: A statistically significant increase in corneal backward light scattering (P < .0001) was detected within the central 10 mm of the anterior cornea. The increase in corneal densitometry was gradually reversed over 6 months. The difference compared to preoperative values was no longer statistically significant at 3 and 6 months after surgery in the central cornea, whereas it remained significant in the mid-peripheral annulus (ranging from 6 to 10 mm), where the flap edge was located. Conclusions: FS-LASIK is followed by an increase in corneal backward light scattering during the early postoperative period that returns to baseline by 3 months. Whereas the increase in corneal densitometry at the flap edge location can be related to a scarring reaction, the explanation for such an increase in the central anterior cornea remains speculative. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(1):20-25.].
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To describe the changes in visual acuity and topographic analysis in a patient affected by advanced pellucid marginal degeneration (PMD). Methods: A 59-year-old woman with bilateral PMD who was contact lens intolerant was treated by sliding keratoplasty before and 3 months after transepithelial (epi-on) iontophoresis collagen cross-linking (I-CXL) in one eye. Corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), spherical equivalent and cylinder refraction, corneal topography, ultrasound pachymetry, and endothelial cell count were assessed at baseline and up to 12 months postoperatively. Results: After 1 year of follow-up, CDVA increased from 20/200 to 20/50 and the videokeratographic patterns significantly improved. Endothelial cell counts did not change significantly (P > .05). Conclusions: Sliding keratoplasty combined with I-CXL was safe and effective in the treatment of advanced PMD. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(1):47-50.].
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To discuss intraoperative and postoperative femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK flap complications and their management. Methods: Review of published literature. Results: Flap creation is a critical step in LASIK. The femtosecond laser has improved the overall predictability and safety of the lamellar incision, but complications can still occur during or after flap creation. Although many complications (eg, epithelial ingrowth and flap striae) were reduced with the femtosecond laser application, other specific complications have emerged, such as vertical gas breakthrough, opaque bubble layer, and transient light-sensitivity syndrome. Conclusions: The application of femtosecond laser technology to LASIK flap creation has increased greatly since its introduction. These lasers have improved the safety and predictability of the lamellar incision step. The majority of the femtosecond laser-assisted flap complications can be well managed without significant effects on refractive outcomes. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(1):52-59.].
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To compare the objective and subjective quality of vision after femtosecond laser-assisted small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and laser-assisted subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) for mild to moderate myopia. Methods: This prospective, comparative study included 65 eyes of 33 patients in the SMILE group, with a mean spherical equivalent (SE) of -4.16 ± 0.82 diopters, and 50 eyes of 25 patients in the LASEK group, with a mean SE of -3.81 ± 0.97 diopters. Visual acuity, corneal topography, contrast sensitivity, and wavefront aberrations were recorded preoperatively and compared with postoperative measurements. A quality of vision questionnaire was scored and analyzed 3 months postoperatively. Results: Three months postoperatively, the SMILE group had fewer (P < .05) higher-order aberrations (HOAs) (0.390 ± 0.175 µm), including spherical aberration (SA) (0.262 ± 0.242 µm), than the LASEK group (HOAs = 0.479 ± 0.148 µm, SA = 0.576 ± 0.287 µm, trefoil = 0.465 ± 0.248 µm). There was no significant difference in the amount of coma and trefoil between the two groups after surgery. Analysis of the scores of glare and halos in the quality of vision questionnaire revealed that SMILE (night glare = 1.25 ± 1.22, halos = 0.97 ± 1.12) provided a better quality of vision (P < .05) than LASEK (night glare = 2.32 ± 1.99, halos = 1.96 ± 1.77). The two groups demonstrated no significant difference in contrast sensitivity 3 months postoperatively. No vision-threatening complications were noted at any stage in either group. Conclusions: Both SMILE and LASEK are safe and effective surgical procedures in the correction of myopia. SMILE has a lower induction rate of HOAs and a higher degree of patient satisfaction than LASEK at 3 months postoperatively. [J Refract Surg. 2015;31(12):795-800.].
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To examine the optical effects of Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) by evaluating changes in anterior and posterior corneal curvatures and aberrations. Methods: Eighty-three eyes treated using DSAEK combined with cataract surgery (the DSAEK group) and 41 control eyes of healthy patients (the control group) were included. Patients were examined before and 1 year after surgery with autokeratometry and Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany). The preoperative posterior corneal curvature was estimated from the anterior corneal curvature. Results: The mean intended postoperative refraction in the DSAEK group was -0.75 ± 0.62 diopters (D), which was statistically different from the achieved refraction of +0.50 ± 0.93 D at the 1-year follow-up (P < .001). The average biometry prediction error was a hyperopic shift of +1.27 ± 0.80 D. Anterior corneal power was significantly higher before than after DSAEK with a difference of -0.63 ± 0.68 D (P = .03) correlating significantly with the hyperopic change (r(2) = 0.23, P < .01). The posterior corneal power after DSAEK showed a significant steepening of -0.69 ± 0.38 D (P < .01) from the estimated preoperative power and a difference of -0.64 ± 0.38 D (P < .01) from the posterior corneal power in the control group. The change correlated significantly with the hyperopic change (r(2) = 0.10, P < .01). The combined changes in anterior and posterior keratometry increased the correlation coefficient to r(2) = 0.34 (P < .01). Significant differences were observed for total higher-order aberrations root mean square and coma root mean square after DSAEK compared to controls. No significant changes were observed in spherical aberration. Conclusions: The hyperopic shift in the DSAEK group can be explained by changes in anterior and posterior corneal surfaces. Spherical aberration was not changed by DSAEK, suggesting that aspherical intraocular lenses may be implanted on the same indications as in normal cataract surgery. [J Refract Surg. 2015;31(12):807-812.].
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To report a case of recalcitrant epithelial ingrowth after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) treated successfully with a novel hydrogel ocular sealant. Methods: Case report and literature review. Results: A 32-year-old man who underwent small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) complicated by difficult lenticule extraction developed visually significant epithelial ingrowth. He then underwent two flap lifts and epithelial scrapings and flap edge suturing with recurrence of epithelial ingrowth despite these interventions. He subsequently underwent repeat scraping, followed by hydrogel ocular sealant placement (ReSure Sealant; Ocular Therapeutix, Inc., Bedford, MA), which prevented recurrence of epithelial ingrowth and reduced corneal haze. The patient was also found to have undiagnosed diabetes, suggesting that just as in LASIK, diabetes may be a risk factor for epithelial ingrowth after SMILE. Conclusions: Interface epithelial ingrowth is a potential complication after SMILE and diabetes may be a risk factor for this complication. Hydrogel ocular sealant may be effective after SMILE to prevent epithelial ingrowth into the interface. [J Refract Surg. 2015;31(12):847-850.].
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To demonstrate a novel technique for the management of dangling lenses with near complete zonular dehiscence. Methods: A capsule-sparing combined anterior and posterior surgical approach for dangling lenses with severe zonular dehiscence is described. The surgical record of a patient who underwent phacoemulsification with "dangling lens technique" and in-the-bag intraocular lens (IOL) implantation was evaluated. Results: This technique was able to preserve the lens capsule, allowing freedom of IOL choice and an optimally reconstructed anterior segment. Placement of sutured capsular tension rings (CTRs) or segments provided long-term stabilization of the capsular bag and the bag-fixated posterior chamber IOL. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred during a follow-up of 3 years. Conclusions: Combined microincisional pars plana vitrectomy, posterior levitation of the crystalline lens, phacoemulsification with sutured CTR, and in-the-bag IOL placement may be considered for surgical management of patients with nearly luxated, dangling, crystalline lenses. [J Refract Surg. 2015;31(12):835-838.].
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate whether short-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) pretreatment on the day of surgery inhibits prostaglandin release. Previous studies detected elevated prostaglandin levels after femtosecond laser treatment and identified them as a potential mediator for laser-induced miosis. Methods: Patients underwent either image-guided femtosecond laser cataract surgery or conventional cataract surgery (n = 75). Half of the eyes per group received topical NSAID treatment on the day of surgery. Aqueous humor was collected from all patients. ELISA measurements were performed to detect aqueous humor prostaglandin levels. Results: Femtosecond laser cataract surgery led to higher prostaglandin levels than conventional cataract surgery (P = .007). In both groups, NSAID pretreatment led to reduced prostaglandin release. In the femtosecond laser group, patients pretreated with NSAIDs had significantly lower prostaglandin values (65.3 ± 13.2 pg/mL) than patients not pretreated with NSAIDs (294.4 ± 66.5 pg/mL) (P = .0009). Conclusions: The short-term NSAID treatment prevented prostaglandin release in patients treated with image-guided femtosecond laser. Therefore, it has potential to limit intraoperative laser-induced miosis. [J Refract Surg. 2015;31(12):791-794.].
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995)