Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education (J DEAF STUD DEAF EDU)

Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)

Journal description

The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education is a scholarly journal integrating and coordinating basic and applied research relating to individuals who are deaf including cultural developmental linguistic and educational topics. The Journals of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education addresses issues of current and future concern to allied fields encouraging interdisciplinary discussion. The journal promises a forum that is timely of high quality and accessible to researchers and educators as well as lay audiences. The journal consists of four issues per year including occasional Special Issues. Visit the website of the 19th International Congress on Education of the Deaf and 7th Asia-Pacific Congress on Deafness (ICED 2000). Sydney 9-13 July 2000.

Current impact factor: 1.02

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 1.375

Additional details

5-year impact 1.51
Cited half-life 7.50
Immediacy index 0.32
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.38
Website Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education website
Other titles Journal of deaf studies and deaf education (Online), JDSDE
ISSN 1081-4159
OCLC 51288813
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Oxford University Press (OUP)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print can only be posted prior to acceptance
    • Pre-print must be accompanied by set statement (see link)
    • Pre-print must not be replaced with post-print, instead a link to published version with amended set statement should be made
    • Pre-print on author's personal website, employer website, free public server or pre-prints in subject area
    • Post-print in Institutional repositories or Central repositories
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany archived copy (see policy)
    • Eligible authors may deposit in OpenDepot
    • The publisher will deposit in PubMed Central on behalf of NIH authors
    • Publisher last contacted on 19/02/2015
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Oxford University Press (OUP)'
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Deaf individuals have been found to score lower than hearing individuals across a variety of memory tasks involving both verbal and nonverbal stimuli, particularly those requiring retention of serial order. Deaf individuals who are native signers, meanwhile, have been found to score higher on visual-spatial memory tasks than on verbal-sequential tasks and higher on some visual-spatial tasks than hearing nonsigners. However, hearing status and preferred language modality (signed or spoken) frequently are confounded in such studies. That situation is resolved in the present study by including deaf students who use spoken language and sign language interpreting students (hearing signers) as well as deaf signers and hearing nonsigners. Three complex memory span tasks revealed overall advantages for hearing signers and nonsigners over both deaf signers and deaf nonsigners on 2 tasks involving memory for verbal stimuli (letters). There were no differences among the groups on the task involving visual-spatial stimuli. The results are consistent with and extend recent findings concerning the effects of hearing status and language on memory and are discussed in terms of language modality, hearing status, and cognitive abilities among deaf and hearing individuals.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
  • Source

    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
  • Source

    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Semantic and lexical decision tasks were used to investigate the mechanisms underlying code-blend facilitation: the finding that hearing bimodal bilinguals comprehend signs in American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English words more quickly when they are presented together simultaneously than when each is presented alone. More robust facilitation effects were observed for semantic decision than for lexical decision, suggesting that lexical integration of signs and words within a code-blend occurs primarily at the semantic level, rather than at the level of form. Early bilinguals exhibited greater facilitation effects than late bilinguals for English (the dominant language) in the semantic decision task, possibly because early bilinguals are better able to process early visual cues from ASL signs and use these to constrain English word recognition. Comprehension facilitation via semantic integration of words and signs is consistent with co-speech gesture research demonstrating facilitative effects of gesture integration on language comprehension.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The American Sign Language Comprehension Test (ASL-CT) is a 30-item multiple-choice test that measures ASL receptive skills and is administered through a website. This article describes the development and psychometric properties of the test based on a sample of 80 college students including deaf native signers, hearing native signers, deaf non-native signers, and hearing ASL students. The results revealed that the ASL-CT has good internal reliability (α = 0.834). Discriminant validity was established by demonstrating that deaf native signers performed significantly better than deaf non-native signers and hearing native signers. Concurrent validity was established by demonstrating that test results positively correlated with another measure of ASL ability (r = .715) and that hearing ASL students’ performance positively correlated with the level of ASL courses they were taking (r = .726). Researchers can use the ASL-CT to characterize an individual’s ASL comprehension skills, to establish a minimal skill level as an inclusion criterion for a study, to group study participants by ASL skill (e.g., proficient vs. nonproficient), or to provide a measure of ASL skill as a dependent variable.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
  • Source

    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
  • Source

    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
  • Source

    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
  • Source

    Preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to explore the relative contributions of phonological, semantic radical, and morphological awareness to Chinese word recognition in deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. Measures of word recognition, general intelligence, phonological, semantic radical, and morphological awareness were administered to 32 DHH and 35 hearing children in Hong Kong. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that tone, semantic radical, and morphological awareness made independent contributions to word recognition in DHH children after the effects of age and intelligence were statistically controlled for. Semantic radical and morphological awareness was found to explain significantly more variance than tone awareness in predicting word recognition in DHH children. This study has replicated previous evidence regarding the importance of semantic radical and morphological awareness in Chinese word recognition in hearing children and extended its significance to DHH children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education