Reviews in Fisheries Science (REV FISH SCI)

Publisher: American Fisheries Society, Taylor & Francis

Journal description

Reviews in Fisheries Science provides an important forum for the publication of up-to-date reviews, historical articles, and original research covering the broad range of subject areas in fisheries science. These areas include management, aquaculture, taxonomy, behavior, stock identification, genetics, nutrition, and physiology.

Current impact factor: 1.87

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.867
2013 Impact Factor 2.368
2012 Impact Factor 2.417
2011 Impact Factor 1.946
2010 Impact Factor 2.163
2009 Impact Factor 1.939
2008 Impact Factor 2.375
2007 Impact Factor 1.462
2006 Impact Factor 1.312
2005 Impact Factor 3.062
2004 Impact Factor 2.115

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.88
Cited half-life 8.20
Immediacy index 0.29
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 1.08
Website Reviews in Fisheries Science website
Other titles Reviews in fisheries science, Fisheries science
ISSN 1064-1262
OCLC 26210450
Material type Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acanthopagrus butcheri was restocked in an estuary in which it had become depleted. The restocked fish were cultured in 2001 and 2002 using broodstock from that estuary. These fish, whose otoliths had been stained with alizarin complex one, were released into the estuary and their biological performance tracked for seven to eight years. The 2002 cohort, introduced at circa four months old in autumn, survived far better than the 2001 cohort, introduced at circa seven months old in winter, when freshwater discharge peaks and temperatures are low. While restocked fish matured and grew nearly as fast as wild fish, the increase in density was accompanied by a reduced growth of wild fish. Genetic comparisons, using seven microsatellite loci, demonstrated that the expected heterozygosity and relatedness of restocked and wild A. butcheri, which is naturally characterized by low levels of genetic polymorphism, were similar. Although culturing did not demonstrably increase the level of inbreeding, it did result in the loss of some rare alleles. The biological and genetic results, together with the contribution of restocked A. butcheri to the commercial catch for this species in the estuary rising to 62–74% by 2007–2010, demonstrates the efficacy of using restocking to replenish depleted A. butcheri stocks.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Reviews in Fisheries Science
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acanthopagrus butcheri was restocked in an estuary in which it had become depleted. The restocked fish were cultured in 2001 and 2002 using broodstock from that estuary. These fish, whose otoliths had been stained with alizarin complexone, were released into the estuary and their biological performance tracked for seven to eight years. The 2002 cohort, introduced at circa four months old in autumn, survived far better than the 2001 cohort, introduced at circa seven months old in winter, when freshwater discharge peaks and temperatures are low. While restocked fish matured and grew nearly as fast as wild fish, the increase in density was accompanied by a reduced growth of wild fish. Genetic comparisons, using seven microsatellite loci, demonstrated that the expected heterozygosity and relatedness of restocked and wild A. butcheri, which is naturally characterized by low levels of genetic polymorphism, were similar. Although culturing did not demonstrably increase the level of inbreeding, it did result in the loss of some rare alleles. The biological and genetic results, together with the contribution of restocked A. butcheri to the commercial catch for this species in the estuary rising to 62–74% by 2007–2010, demonstrates the efficacy of using restocking to replenish depleted A. butcheri stocks.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · Reviews in Fisheries Science