Journal of AOAC International (J AOAC INT)

Publisher: AOAC International, AOAC International

Journal description

The Journal of AOAC International publishes fully refereed contributed papers in the fields of chemical and biological analysis: on original research on new techniques and applications, collaborative studies, authentic data of composition, studies leading to method development, meeting symposia, newly adopted AOAC approved methods and invited reviews.

Current impact factor: 1.12

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.12
2013 Impact Factor 1.385
2012 Impact Factor 1.233
2011 Impact Factor 1.199
2010 Impact Factor 1.229
2009 Impact Factor 1.216
2008 Impact Factor 1.122
2007 Impact Factor 1.549
2006 Impact Factor 1.352
2005 Impact Factor 1.046
2004 Impact Factor 1.147
2003 Impact Factor 1.037
2002 Impact Factor 0.907
2001 Impact Factor 1.33
2000 Impact Factor 1.066
1999 Impact Factor 0.95
1998 Impact Factor 0.948
1997 Impact Factor 1.138
1996 Impact Factor 1.256
1995 Impact Factor 0.797
1994 Impact Factor 0.762

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.17
Cited half-life 9.60
Immediacy index 0.17
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.28
Website Journal of AOAC (Association of Official Analytical Chemists) International website
Other titles Journal of AOAC International
ISSN 1060-3271
OCLC 24929715
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

AOAC International

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • The publisher will deposit in PubMed Central on behalf of NIH authors
  • Classification
    white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The QuickTox Kit for QuickScan Aflatoxin FREE uses competitive lateral flow technology and a reader based system for quantitative determination of total aflatoxins in varied matrixes. Aqueous based extraction protocols are used for corn and wheat, reducing use of solvents. Fifty percent ethanol (Reagent Alcohol) extraction is used for oats, sorghum, and barley. Eighty percent ethanol (Reagent Alcohol) extraction is used for whole peanut, peanut seed, and peanut hull samples. Matrix specific assay procedures and calibration curves are used to enable analyses across multiple sample types. The performance of this assay was examined using naturally contaminated aflatoxin corn samples and spiked samples of barley, oats, sorghum, wheat, whole peanut, peanut seed, and peanut hull samples. All data were judged against previously established acceptance criteria. Performance was evaluated in linearity, selectivity, matrix, lot consistency, and robustness experiments in the sponsor's laboratory. Results produced in all studies except robustness were within acceptable ranges. Out of range robustness study results reflected simultaneous deviation in sample volume and assay development time compared to the standard assay procedures. Aflatoxin B1, B2, and G1 were detected with approximately equal sensitivity; sensitivity for G2 was 64% that of B1. The presence of other common mycotoxins did not interfere with the assay. Matrix studies in an independent laboratory examined corn and barley to challenge both aqueous and ethanol based extraction procedures. All data points in these studies fell within the ranges defined in the acceptance criteria. The assay exhibited a linear dose response over the range tested, 0-100 ppb, with R(2) values exceeding 0.93 and RSDr values for results ranging from 2.27 to 23.84%.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The GlutenTox(®) Pro Test is an immunochromatographic test for the detection of gluten in foods and on surfaces with varying compositions and levels of processing, from raw foods/ingredients to final product testing. The Method Developer evaluation for the validation of the GlutenTox Pro Test Kit (Biomedal Diagnostics, Sevilla, Spain) for the detection of gluten in foods and on surfaces was conducted at Biomedal, S. L., Camas, Sevilla, Spain. The GlutenTox Pro test method was evaluated by testing the following: cross-reactivity, interference, specificity and sensitivity, robustness, stability, lot-to-lot variation, food matrix, and environmental surface. To evaluate the performance of the GlutenToxPro test for the detection of gluten, 10 matrixes were selected: rice flour, bread/biscuit, rolled oat, pâté, and yogurt (and a second bread matrix for incurred sampled testing) for the food matrix study and food-grade painted wood, plastic, rubber, sealed ceramic, and stainless steel for the environmental surface matrix study. For the food matrix study, 30 replicates were evaluated at six spiked levels of gluten (0, 3, 8, 15, 25, and 45 ppm) against four detection thresholds (5, 10, 20, and 40 ppm) for each food matrix. Additionally, 10 replicates were evaluated at a concentration of 10 000 ppm using all four detection thresholds only for rice flour matrix. Three replicates of each concentration level of gluten were analyzed using paired samples by the AOAC OMA 2012.01 reference method for each food matrix. For the environmental surface study, 30 replicates were evaluated at a low spike level of gluten (16 ng/16 cm(2)), five replicates at a high spike level of gluten (400 ng/16 cm(2)), and five replicates at an unspiked control level (0 ng/16 cm(2)) for each surface matrix. Upon completion of testing, the probability of detection values and confidence intervals were calculated and plotted versus the concentration level as determined by the reference method when applicable. An independent laboratory evaluation of the GlutenTox Pro Test Kit with rice flour and stainless steel environmental surface was conducted at Q Laboratories, Inc. (Cincinnati, OH). The GlutenTox Pro Test Kit demonstrated reliability as an effective rapid method for the detection of gluten in food matrixes (LOD 5 ppm gluten; threshold limits 5, 10, 20, and 40 ppm gluten) and on environmental surfaces (amount of detection 16 ng/16 cm(2)).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A new, simple, and rapid chiral HPLC method was developed for enantioselective analysis of levetiracetam and its enantiomer [(R )-α-ethyl-2- oxo-pyrrolidine acetamide] in a pharmaceutical formulation and bulk material. Enantiomeric separation was achieved on a chiral-α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) column (150 × 4.0 mm, 5 μm) using an isocratic mobile phase of phosphate buffer (pH = 7) at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. The UV detector was set at 210 nm. Calibration curves were linear in the range of 1-100 μg/mL and 0.4-20 μg/mL for levetiracetam and the (R)-enantiomer, respectively. LOD and LOQ for the (R)-enantiomer were 0.1 and 0.4 μg/mL, respectively. The run time of analysis was less than 5.0 min.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A novel reusable immunoaffinity cartridge containing monoclonal antibodies to aflatoxins coupled to a pressure resistant polymer has been developed. The cartridge is used in conjunction with a handling system inline to LC with fluorescence detection to provide fully automated aflatoxin analysis for routine monitoring of a variety of food matrixes. The handling system selects an immunoaffinity cartridge from a tray and automatically applies the sample extract. The cartridge is washed, then aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 are eluted and transferred inline to the LC system for quantitative analysis using fluorescence detection with postcolumn derivatization using a KOBRA(®) cell. Each immunoaffinity cartridge can be used up to 15 times without loss in performance, offering increased sample throughput and reduced costs compared to conventional manual sample preparation and cleanup. The system was validated in two independent laboratories using samples of peanuts and maize spiked at 2, 8, and 40 μg/kg total aflatoxins, and paprika, nutmeg, and dried figs spiked at 5, 20, and 100 μg/kg total aflatoxins. Recoveries exceeded 80% for both aflatoxin B1 and total aflatoxins. The between-day repeatability ranged from 2.1 to 9.6% for aflatoxin B1 for the six levels and five matrixes. Satisfactory Z -scores were obtained with this automated system when used for participation in proficiency testing (FAPAS(®)) for samples of chilli powder and hazelnut paste containing aflatoxins.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The characterization of marker components in botanical materials is a challenging task, and the increased consumption of botanicals and dietary supplements demands a greater understanding of the associated health benefits and risks. In order to successfully acquire and compare clinical results and correlate health trends, accurate, precise, and validated methods of analysis must be developed. Presented here is the development of a quantitative method for the determination of soy isoflavones (daidzin, glycitin, genistin, daidzein, and genistein) using LC-particle beam/electron ionization-MS (LC-PB/EIMS). An internal standard (IS) approach for quantitation with 7-hydroxy-4- chromone as the IS compound was used, with response factors for each individual isoflavone obtained from calibrant solutions. The results from this method were compared with the certified and reference values for National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) SRM 3238 Soy-Containing Solid Oral Dosage Form to demonstrate that the method was in control. Results obtained using LC-PB/EIMS were consistent with the NIST certified or reference values and their uncertainties for all five isoflavones, demonstrating that the LC-PB/EIMS approach is both accurate and precise when used for the determination of the target isoflavones in soy-containing dietary supplement finished products while simultaneously providing structural information.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The special nutritious value of camel showed high potential for market exploitation. In this paper, a real-time PCR method targeting camel ingredient in camel meat and milk is reported as an approach to fight against adulteration. To understand the impact of processing procedures on the amplifiability of cytb gene, four kinds of processed camel meat were investigated, and the rate of DNA breakage was explored. The method was able to detect 5 fg/μL camel DNA and highly processed food containing 0.01% camel meat with a high confidence level.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Two simple, accurate, and precise chromatographic methods have been developed and validated for the determination of dronedarone (DRO) HCl and amiodarone (AMI) HCl either alone or in binary mixtures due to the possibility of using AMI as a counterfeit of DRO because of its lower price. First, an RP-HPLC method is described for the simultaneous determination of DRO and AMI. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a BDS Hypersil C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm). Isocratic elution based on potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer with 0.1% triethylamine pH 6-methanol (10 + 90, v/v) at a flow rate of 2 mL/min with UV detection at 254 nm was performed. The second method is RP ultra-HPLC in which the chromatographic separation was achieved on an Acclaim(TM) RSLC 120 C18 column (100 × 2.1 mm, 2.2 μm) using isocratic elution with potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer with 0.1% triethylamine pH 6-methanol (5 + 95, v/v) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min with UV detection at 254 nm. Linearity, accuracy, and precision of the two methods were found to be acceptable over the concentration ranges of 5-80 μg/mL for both DRO and AMI. The results were statistically compared using one-way analysis of variance. The optimized methods were validated and proved to be specific, robust, precise, and accurate for the QC of the drugs in their pharmaceutical preparations.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lighting in the working environment plays a significant role on the degree of degradation of photosensitive, thermolabile compounds and on working efficiency. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are semiconductor light emitting devices that are promising artificial light sources with easy modulation of light wave signals and are also known for low heat generation. Therefore, the effect of polychromatic LED light was tested in the working environment using the drug compounds montelukast, nifedipine, and clavulanic acid, which are known to be photosensitive or thermolabile. As a control, other lighting sources like a sodium lamp, a classic (incandescent, tungsten) lamp, and indirect sunlight were also used in this study. All the experiments were carried out with methanolic solutions at room temperature. An Acquity UPLC/MS/MS system was used for quantification of the main analytes and degradation products. Under the tested conditions, LED lighting proved to be more suitable for handling photosensitive and thermolabile compounds.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An ultra-performance LC (UPLC) method was developed to determine the manufacturing intermediates and subsidiary colors in the monosulfo monoazo color additives D&C Red No. 6 and D&C Red No. 7 and their lakes. This method is intended for use in batch certification of the color additives by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration to ensure that each lot meets published specifications for coloring drugs and cosmetics. The intermediates are 2-amino-5-methylbenzenesulfonic acid (PTMS) and 3-hydroxy-2-naphthalenecarboxylic acid (3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid). The subsidiary colors are 3-hydroxy-4-[(4-methylphenyl)azo]-2-naphthalenecarboxylic acid (unsulfonated subsidiary color) and 1-[(4-methylphenyl) azo]-2-naphthalenol (4-methyl Sudan I). The analytes were identified by comparing their UPLC retention times and UV-Vis absorption spectra with those of standards. Validation studies showed that calibration curves were linear (average R(2) = 0.9994), and recoveries were 96-106%. Average LOD was 0.0014-0.0061% and average LOQ was 0.0047-0.020%. Results for RSD at the specification levels ranged from 0.67 to 5.79%. Survey analyses of 42 samples from 14 domestic and foreign manufacturers yielded results by the new UPLC method and a previously reported HPLC method that were consistent within experimental error. The new UPLC method provided increased sensitivity, faster analysis times, and improved separations compared to the HPLC method.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In order to determine repeatability and reproducibility of AOAC First Action Method 2012.16 [Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Ultra-High Pressure Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry], a collaborative study was organized. The study was divided in two parts: method setup and qualification of participants (part 1) and collaborative study participation (part 2). For part 1, each participating laboratory was asked to analyze two practice samples using the aforementioned method. Laboratories that provided results within a range of expected levels were qualified for part 2, during which each laboratory received 10 samples in blind duplicates. Results have been compared to the Standard Method Performance Requirement (SMPR(®)) 2012.009 established for pantothenic acid. Precision results (repeatability and reproducibility) were within the limits stated in the SMPR. Repeatability ranged from 1.3 to 3.3%, and reproducibility ranged from 4.1 to 7.0%. Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values were all <1, ranging from 0.33 to 0.69. The AOAC Expert Review Panel on Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals Nutrient Methods determined that the data presented met the SMPR and recommended the method for Final Action status, which was then granted by the AOAC Official Methods Board.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Crystal Diagnostics (CDx) Xpress E7 STEC kit is a rapid and sensitive detection assay for the detection of Escherichia coli O157 and six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (serogroups O26, O45, O1O3, O111, O121, and O145, collectively referred to as STEC) at 1 CFU/325 g of raw ground beef and raw beef trim, or 200 g of spinach. The system comprises an automatic Crystal Diagnostics Xpress System Reader that integrates immunochemical and optical processes for the liquid crystal-based detection of microorganisms, a CDx BioCassette that incorporates antibody-coupled microspheres and liquid crystal for selective identification of the intended microbe, and additional commercially available components. The Crystal Diagnostics Xpress System(TM) combines proprietary liquid crystal technology with antibody-coated paramagnetic microspheres to selectively capture and detect STEC from food matrixes. The Xpress System expeditiously (9.5 h enrichment) provides the sensitivity and specificity of the U. S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration reference methods in screening as low as 1 STEC CFU/test portion. The inclusivity validation demonstrated detection of 53 of 54 STEC test strains. Shelf life testing of the antibody-coated microspheres and other Crystal Diagnostic consumables indicated that all materials were stable for a minimum of 3 months (ongoing), and lot-to-lot testing demonstrated consistent results between lots (data not shown). The internal and independent laboratory tests demonstrate that the method is rapid and sensitive for screening of the target STEC.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: AOAC First Action Method 2011.18, Myo-Inositol (Free and Bound as Phosphatidylinositol) in Infant and Pediatric Formulas and Adult Nutritionals, was collaboratively studied. With this method free myo-inositol and phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol are extracted using two different sample preparation procedures, separated by ion chromatography using a combination of Dionex Carbo Pac PA1 and MA1 columns with column switching, and detected with pulsed amperometry using a gold electrode. Free myo-inositol is extracted from samples with dilute hydrochloric acid and water. Phosphatidylinositol is extracted from samples with chloroform and separated from other fats with silica SPE cartridges. Myo-inositol is then released from the glycerol backbone with concentrated acetic and hydrochloric acids at 120°C. During this collaborative study, nine laboratories from five different countries analyzed blind duplicates of nine infant and pediatric nutritional formulas for both free and phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol, and one additional laboratory only completed the free myo-inositol analyses. The method demonstrated acceptable repeatability and reproducibility and met the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPRs(®)) for free myo-inositol plus phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol for all the matrixes analyzed. SMPRs for repeatability were ≤5% RSD at myo-inositol concentrations of 2-68 mg/100 g ready-to-feed (RTF) liquid. SMPRs for reproducibility were ≤8% RSD in products with myo-inositol concentrations ranging from 2 to 68 mg/100 g RTF liquid. During this collaborative study, repeatability RSDs ranged from 0.51 to 3.22%, and RSDs ranged from 2.66 to 7.55% for free myo-inositol plus phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An accurate method was developed for determining ochratoxin A (OTA) in pig kidney using an immunoaffinity column for cleanup and ultra-HPLC/MS/MS for identification and quantification. Mean recoveries of OTA from kidney samples fortified at 0.10-5 μg/kg levels ranged from 74 to 92%, with RSDs of 4.6-7.5%. The LOD was estimated to be 0.03 μg/kg and the LOQ was 0.10 μg/kg based on an S/N in kidney of 3:1 and 10:1, respectively. The developed method was used for the determination of OTA in pig kidney. A survey of the OTA content of pig kidneys slaughtered in Chongqing, China, revealed that 35 out of 40 analyzed samples were contaminated; the OTA concentration in kidney ranged from trace level (0.03-0.1) to 0.323 μg/kg. This method was shown to be useful for accurately evaluating the intake of OTA from pig kidneys.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The identification and quantification of four anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-O -glucoside, peonidin- 3-O -glucoside, delphinidin-3-O -glucoside, and malvidin-3-O-glucoside) in red grape wine were carried out by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole linear ion trap MS (HILIC/QTrap-MS/MS). Samples were diluted directly and separated on a Merck ZIC HILIC column with 20 mM ammonium acetate solution-acetonitrile mobile phase. Quantitative data acquisition was carried out in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Additional identification and confirmation of target compounds were performed using the enhanced product ion mode of the linear ion trap. The LOQs were in the range 0.05-1.0 ng/mL. The average recoveries were in the range 94.6 to 104.5%. The HILIC/QTrap-MS/MS platform offers the best sensitivity and specificity for characterization and quantitative determination of the four anthocyanins in red grape wines and fulfills the quality criteria for routine laboratory application.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A simple and accurate authentication method for the detection of adulterated vegetable oils that contain waste cooking oil (WCO) was developed. This method is based on the determination of cholesterol, β-sitosterol, and campesterol in vegetable oils and WCO by GC/MS without any derivatization. A total of 148 samples involving 12 types of vegetable oil and WCO were analyzed. According to the results, the contents and ratios of cholesterol, β-sitosterol, and campesterol were found to be criteria for detecting vegetable oils adulterated with WCO. This method could accurately detect adulterated vegetable oils containing 5% refined WCO. The developed method has been successfully applied to multilaboratory analysis of 81 oil samples. Seventy-five samples were analyzed correctly, and only six adulterated samples could not be detected. This method could not yet be used for detection of vegetable oils adulterated with WCO that are used for frying non-animal foods. It provides a quick method for detecting adulterated edible vegetable oils containing WCO.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: AOAC First Action Method 2011.19: Chromium, Selenium, and Molybdenum in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritional Products, was collaboratively studied. This method uses microwave digestion of samples with nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and internal standard followed by simultaneous detection of the elements by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP)/MS instrument equipped with a collision/ reaction cell. During this collaborative study, nine laboratories from four different countries, using seven different models of ICP/MS instruments, analyzed blind duplicates of seven infant, pediatric, and adult nutritional formulas. One laboratory's set of data was rejected in its entirety. The method demonstrated acceptable repeatability and reproducibility and met the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPRs(®)) for almost all of the matrixes analyzed. The Cr, Mo, and Se SPIFAN requirement for repeatability was ≤5% RSD. The SMPR called for a reproducibility of ≤15% RSD for products with ultratrace element concentrations above the targeted LOQ of 20 μg/kg Cr/Mo and 10 μg/kg Se (as ready-to-feed). During this collaborative study, RSDr ranged from 1.0 to 7.0% and RSDR ranged from 2.5 to 13.4% across all three ultratrace elements.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The method described is intended for the quantification of all fatty acids, including commercially important groups of fatty acids used for labeling reasons [i. e., trans fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9] and/or individual fatty acids (i. e., linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, ecosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid) in milk products, infant formula, and adult/pediatric nutritional formula. These products often contain milk fat and/or vegetable oils and are supplemented or not supplemented with oils rich in long-chain PUFA. The determination is performed by direct transesterification of ready-to-feed (RTF) liquid concentrate or powder products without prior fat extraction. Single-laboratory validation (SLV) data were submitted to the AOAC Expert Review Panel (ERP) on Nutrient Methods for review at the AOAC Annual Meeting held on September 30 to October 3, 2012, in Las Vegas, NV. The ERP determined that the data reviewed met the Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPR(®) 2012.011) set by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) and was approved as an AOAC Official First Action method. The analytical range for SPIFAN samples was between 0.001 and 7.94 g/100 g reconstituted product or RTF liquid. LOQ was estimated as 0.001 g/100 g, while repeatability and intermediate precision were both less than 1.8% RSD above 0.05 g/100 g and <3.5% RSD at 0.005 g/100 g. Recovery values based on spiking experiments at two different levels of linoleic and linolenic acids ranged from 100.0 to 102.9% for three different SPIFAN products. All the parameters evaluated during the SLV were well within the values defined in SMPR 2012.011.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of AOAC International