Journal of Family Social Work (J Fam Soc Work)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

The Journal of Family Social Work brings together thoughtful professionals who discuss their views on what constitutes family social work, showing both the differences and common ground between social workers' views on family practice. It is the first peer-reviewed social work journal devoted to ecosystemic theory, examining the self of the clinician, research, and practice with couples and families. It represents a coming together of the historical beginnings and current practice interest of many social workers and provides a fresh blend of person-in-situation-based casework, family support, and family treatment. Especially interested in innovations in research, theory, and practice relating to the broad range of family psychosocial needs and resources in present-day society, the Journal of Family Social Work presents timely scholarly findings which: increase understanding of the couple and family through clinicians' and researchers' innovative methods of inquiry, promote collaboration among academics, clinicians, and researchers, create a better understanding of the interplay between and among the effects of the sociopolitical and temporal contexts of the self or the clinician on social work practice with couples and families. The Journal of Family Social Work makes a unique attempt at balancing clinical relevance and academic exactitude. By uniting clinicians and researchers from social work, family enrichment, family therapy, family studies, family psychology and sociology, and child welfare, it stresses a blending of sociocultural contexts, the uniqueness of the family, and the person of the clinician. As an interdisciplinary forum, it provides a creative mixing of clinical innovation, practice wisdom, theory, and academic excellence.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal of Family Social Work website
Other titles Journal of family social work
ISSN 1052-2158
OCLC 22222421
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Family Social Work

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research on Latino parents of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) suggests that these parents often use spirituality to conceptualize and to cope with their child’s diagnosis. However, there are no studies that examine religion among Latino parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study explores how Latino parents of children with ASD incorporate spirituality into their conceptualizations of their child’s disability. In the current study, 34 Latina mothers of children with ASD were interviewed about autism-related services, family characteristics, and cultural beliefs including spiritual beliefs. Thematic analysis of the transcribed interview data relating to spiritual beliefs was conducted for the present study. Most mothers endorsed beliefs that their child with a disability was a message from God. Within this theme, mothers reported beliefs that their child was a blessing from God, a test from God, a sign from God or that the parent was special. Other parents believed that having a child with a disability was not an act of God, but related to biomedical factors, and another group of parents was unsure about the spiritual meaning of their child with a disability. Lastly, some mothers reported that their larger cultural group believed that having a child with a disability was a punishment or a negative sign from God but they markedly rejected that conception. These findings suggest that providers working with Latino families of children with ASD should acknowledge the importance of spirituality for these families.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In recent years there has been an increase in research examining issues related to fathers. Despite these contributions to the literature, studies including primarily African American samples disproportionately feature fathers who are non-resident, low income, or incarcerated. Thus, little is known about African American men from across the social and economic spectrum. To fill this gap, this qualitative analysis features a diverse sample of African American men discussing their relationships with their fathers and influence of those relationships on their own fathering attitudes and behaviors. Findings revealed that most of the participants modeled their fathers’ behavior. The findings also revealed that participants described their parenting as attempts to leave their children and communities with a legacy of engaged fathering.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The current study intended to answer two main questions: First, do parenting behaviors change as family income changes? Second, if changes in family income are associated with changes in parenting behaviors, is this association different for families of various poverty statuses and ethnicities? Secondary data analyses were conducted using data from Phases I and II of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. The authors found family income increase to predict decreased maternal detachment and negative regard but bears no relation to maternal sensitivity or stimulation of development. Changes in family income also predicted changes in parenting behaviors especially strongly for poor, Hispanic and White families. Implications for parenting research and public policy are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article explores the relationship between boundary ambiguity and borderline personality traits in adolescent girls in foster care. Boundary ambiguity is a family systems concept: family members are uncertain about who is in or out of the family—in either psychological or physical presence or absence. In foster care, it can be assumed that an adolescent girl has experienced trauma significant enough to be removed from her family. The connection between early childhood trauma and attachment disruption in addition to the connection between insecure/disorganized attachment and borderline personality disorder leads to the conclusion that these same adolescents are at high risk for developing borderline personality traits. The sample consists of 40 caseworkers from New England’s child protection departments and therapists from residential programs working with adolescent girls. They completed the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure for Adolescents to determine the presence of personality disruption as well as a variation of Pauline Boss’s Boundary Ambiguity Scale #1, and demographic questionnaires. The results find a significant correlation between boundary ambiguity and borderline personality traits. These findings provide directions for future research in clinical treatment and child welfare policy making.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Child protective worker perspectives and principles are known to affect practitioner–-client interaction. However, there is little research on the principles underpinning workers’ assessment activities in transitioning post-Soviet societies where child protection is a relatively new field. This article presents the findings of a small-scale, qualitative study that explored the perspectives and principles that Estonian child protective workers utilize to inform their assessments. The respondents (N = 20) provided examples of real-life cases that reflected their assessment perspectives. The results indicated that too often workers’ assessments demonstrate an over-reliance on an authoritarian, deficit-based approach that does not sufficiently include family or child perspectives. Such an approach may suggest the lingering influence of philosophies that informed family policy during the Soviet occupation. Workers with advanced training in social work and strength-based practices were more likely to focus on family strengths, build collaborative relationships with parents and children, and report successful outcomes in their cases. This study underscores the potential influence of previous Soviet occupation on child welfare practices in Estonia and also the need for further training of the nation’s child protective workers.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Termination of parental rights (TPR) is one of the most important decisions made by the legal system. Due to the importance of the TPR legal process, it is essential to understand the risk and protective factors that influence TPR decisions and under which conditions these factors are most influential. This commentary begins with a brief review of the literature regarding TPR. Subsequently, the Ben-David article is reviewed, highlighting the strengths and challenges that emerge from the study. Future directions are then discussed, with a focus on several recent articles that should guide researchers in the TPR field. Finally, clinical implications for social service providers and agencies are explored, with particular attention to how the TPR literature can guide best practices in clinical work.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Family engagement is key to the success of child protection interventions. Families can only benefit from the social work interventions they are committed to being involved with, and a multitude of factors act as barriers to effective family engagement with child protection interventions. Despite the importance of family engagement as a practice value there is a lack of specificity in the field regarding how we build engagement, how we identify when it is present, and how we concretely identify its positive results. This article first reviews successful family engagement strategies and examines facilitators of and barriers to effective engagement. A model is then presented that can guide social workers, supervisors, and evaluators by operationalizing the process of family engagement. The model first details actions child protection social workers can take to build engagement and proposes indications that effective engagement has been established. The model then details the increases in information, resources, and empowerment that result from family engagement. This model supports efforts of social workers and their supervisors to enhance engagement with families and assists evaluators in identifying whether engagement is present and has been applied in child protection, kinship, and wraparound practice settings.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A court decision to terminate parental rights and declare a child eligible for adoption (TPR) has far-reaching consequences. However, little is known about the legal decision-making process involved. This study aims to fill this gap and identify the main considerations taken into account by the courts in TPR cases. After analyzing the contents of 261 court decisions, the study found differences between decisions in favor or against TPR based on the characteristics of the child–parent relationship, the parents and the child. Predictors of TPR decisions were also identified. The study discusses the findings and their implications for social work and legal practices and suggests directions for future research.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Studies on risk factors and circumstances related to child maltreatment have continuously emphasized the important role of social support. As a result, peer support groups have been gaining attention and recognition in recent years in the field of child maltreatment prevention. However, little is known about the benefits that child welfare–involved parents receive in peer support groups, as well as the distinctive service elements that make these groups successful. By examining child welfare–involved parents’ experiences participating in peer support groups, this study provided a better understanding of the perceived beneficial aspects of peer support groups, specific types of supports offered to and by peers, and unique characteristics of these groups.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aims of this research were to investigate how parents explore gender and violence with children and develop a conceptual groundwork for understanding the relationship between parental attitudes and behaviors and gender-based violence. Few social work scholars have investigated how parents process gender and violence with their children. This study design was grounded in a phenomenological approach. For data collection, the authors conducted semistructured individual interviews with a sample of five fathers, eight mothers, with at least one child between age 3 and 11 years. The data analysis consisted of In-Vivo and Value coding, from which the researchers developed themes to illustrate the findings. The overarching category that emerged from the data analysis was witnessing and themes included beholding, being present, and perceiving. These themes appeared to be in alignment with mindfulness attitudes and practices and illustrated the way these parents processed gender and violence with their children. The authors developed practice, policy, and research implications from this research.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This research brings together insights from the fields of sociology and social work, providing an integrated study of marriage as a cultural and structural institution. The goals of the study are twofold: first, to empirically assess the predictive power of cultural versus structural elements of marital aspirations and attitudes among “fragile families”; second, to determine if the aforementioned relationship and outcomes differ by immigrant status. The results offer more support for the role of structure than the function of culture, suggesting that rather than demonizing disadvantaged families for having “defective” cultural values, policy planners and human service providers should recognize the importance of educational attainment and economic productivity in fragile families. Even populations most disposed to hold more “traditional” views of marriage and family life are constrained by the realities of structural disadvantage.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although the literature has discussed the extensive family network ties of African Americans and its implications for marital satisfaction, few studies incorporate primarily African American samples in studies of marital satisfaction and social networks. This study draws on a sample of African American married couples from the National Survey of American Life and explores the impact of mutual support, giving and receiving of practical and emotional support, on the marital satisfaction of husbands and wives. Results from the ordinal logistic regression analyses reveal that emotional support received from family and support given to friends are significantly related to husbands’ marital satisfaction whereas emotional support received from family and negative interaction with family contributes to wives’ marital satisfaction. Research and practice implications with African American married couples are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines how Salvadorian immigrant mothers and their daughters negotiate adolescence in a settlement context that differs from their home country. The author interviewed 42 women, all living in a midsized city in Ontario, Canada: 32 in-depth individual interviews were carried out with Salvadorian-born mothers and, separately, with one of their daughters (either adolescent or adult); and five interviews included mothers and their adolescent or adult daughters together (N = 10). A grounded theory approach was employed to explore the mother-daughter negotiation process from each person’s point of view. The analysis revealed various strategies that mothers developed to guide their daughters through the adolescent years, and the diverse ways daughters resisted their mother’s guidance while maintaining values such as respect and family loyalty. The findings highlight the resilience and resourcefulness of immigrant families in navigating the challenges of the transition to adulthood while also meeting the demands of acculturation into a foreign country.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Guided by a conceptual framework highlighting multiple facets of social relationships and social support, this study examined the extent to which aging mothers of adult daughters with a serious mental illness were socially integrated with members of their network. It further examined the relational content of these mothers’ social ties as tangible or intangible support and the nature of their supportive exchanges with network members, particularly their adult daughters with mental illness. A structured face-to-face interview was conducted with 22 aging mothers of these adult daughters. Two methods of analysis were used to analyze data: counting and content analysis. Findings showed aging mothers of daughters with mental illness were socially integrated with relatives and nonrelatives, evidenced relational content of tangible and intangible support in their social ties and engaged in bidirectional and asymmetrical support exchanges with network members, including their daughters with mental illness. These findings suggest that social resources in the form of social relationships and support are embedded in the networks of aging mothers who have adult daughters with serious mental illness. Practitioners should assess support contributions to the aging mothers of adult daughters with serious mental illness from a wide range of social relationships including their daughters.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Family Social Work