Journal of Divorce & Remarriage

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

The landmark Journal of Divorce & Remarriage is an authoritative resource covering all aspects of divorce, including predivorce marital and family treatment, marital separation and dissolution, children's responses to divorce and separation, single parenting, remarriage, and stepfamilies. With its interdisciplinary focus - represented by the professional variety of the editorial board and the wealth of published topics - it is a valuable instrument for many professionals. The Journal of Divorce & Remarriage enriches the clinical skills of all marriage and family specialists, as well as enhances the therapeutic and legal resources for couples and families needing specialized aid with divorce issues. The interdisciplinary Journal of Divorce & Remarriage is valuable to all professionals who help families, including counselors, social workers, family therapists, and lawyers involved in family law. The journal: serves as a medium for viewpoints from a wide variety of fields; publishes the most recent clinical research studies; increases understanding of the changes that accompany divorce and remarriage and how spouses and children adjust to these changes; realizes that divorce and remarriage and their consequences are an interrelated and continuous process for those involved; provides a useful and informative resource for professionals helping families cope with the dissolution of one marriage and the building of another.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal of Divorce & Remarriage website
Other titles Journal of divorce & remarriage, Journal of divorce and remarriage
ISSN 1050-2556
OCLC 21431397
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Findings indicate a large variety of emotional and sexual content is exchanged by married men and married women with the opposite sex on Facebook, constituted as extramarital. Instigating spouses of these extramarital affairs are not cognizant of the total negative marital implications of their actions. Additionally, negative emotional, relational, mental, and spiritual implications are incurred to marriages, generally leading to separation, divorce, or both. These negative implications occur due to a lack of marital guidelines present for communicating with the opposite sex on Facebook. Finally, instigating spouses spiritually detached from their religious faith, whereas many victims became more devoted to their faith, and extended forgiveness to their unfaithful spouses due to the devotion to their faith.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: Divorced women (N = 185) who had changed to their husband’s name responded to a survey about their postdivorce name choice, which included demographic questions, Ambivalent Sexism Inventory, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction in General Scale. Resumers were younger and had more education than women maintainers. Resumers were married for fewer years and had fewer children at the time of divorce. Gender attitudes were not related to postdivorce name choice. Bivariate results provided some support for the hypothesis that name choice would be related to well-being measures. Maintainers reported significantly higher levels of autonomy and competence, but there was no difference in relatedness and self-esteem. Further analysis showed these relationships were moderated by age. Higher levels of autonomy and competence were seen in maintainers, but only among younger women. Possible explanations and the need for further research are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: This article introduces a typology of attitudes toward proceeding with a divorce among parents of minor children. The backdrop is recent research showing that some parents are ambivalent about the divorce and are open to reconciliation services. Surveying a sample of 624 parents who had filed for divorce, the study found that about two thirds of participants were certain they wanted the divorce, about one quarter indicated ambivalence, and about 8% did not want the divorce. These attitudes were strongly linked to interest in reconciliation services. The article discusses implications for lawyers and mediators in assessing divorce ambivalence and offering appropriate services.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: This study seeks to empirically derive the patterns of alcohol consumption among military personnel by forming clusters of military personnel with similar alcohol use and sociodemographic characteristics. The empirical work of this study is based on the 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Findings suggest that alcohol consumption varies according to marital status, education level, and other demographic characteristics (age, sex, and race). Frequent heavy drinking is concentrated among military personnel who are unmarried, between the ages of 18 and 25, non-Hispanic Whites, and men. Tailoring and customizing delivery approaches to focus on the patterns of alcohol consumption as well as the socioeconomic characteristics of the different segments of military personnel in United States could also be a promising alternative.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: This article discusses primarily approaches or methods in dealing with a parent who alienates a child against another parent due to the hostility developed following divorce and separation. The basic vision or aims for combating parents in conflict are delineated. This is followed by the importance of being aware of the problems resulting in parental alienation (PA). To overcome PA an orderly set of stages from soft options to severe strategies are presented, with reasons for the use of the more severe method being provided. Finally, there is an appeal to the family courts and its judges to consider seriously the conclusions reached by one expert witness in how to combat PA by considering first and foremost the short- and long-term needs of the child and secondarily the alienated parent.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: Mental health professionals, lawyers, and judges whose work involves child custody decisions are often presented with social science research on issues related to which parenting plan is in the children’s best interests. Unfortunately, this research can be misrepresented in ways that mislead these professionals and the children’s parents, leading to child custody decisions that are not the most beneficial for the children. The process of misrepresenting the research in ways that create myths and misconceptions has been referred to as woozling. This article describes how social science data can be woozled, illustrating this with examples related to parenting plans for children under the age of 5 whose parents have separated.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 2 female students, 21 and 24 years old. The participants experienced parental divorce during early adolescence (12 years old). This research examined the participants’ own views on the impact of parental divorce and their adjustment processes. The majority of participants’ narratives indicated that they had experienced negative effects of parental divorce. Results suggested that their adjustment was a long process in which mothers, peers, and psychologists had an important role in their coping process. Divorce and associated events were found to have a direct impact on participants’ development of identity, emotions, intimate relationships, father–child relationships, and views about forming their own families. The results were discussed in relation to the previous literature. Additionally, areas for psychotherapeutic emphasis are presented.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: This article discusses the complexity of seeking a solution to problems associated at times with parental alienation. Two scenarios are presented. Both cases involve a child who does not wish to have contact with an absent parent after the separation of the parents due to implacable hostility between them. In the first case, the child had a good relationship with the now absent parent. In the second case the child never had a close relationship with the absent parent. Each case needs to be assessed on its own merits. Conclusions are drawn and recommendations are made as to how to deal with such issues.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: A sample (N = 706) of children, adolescents, young adults, and older adults were surveyed with regard to their views of family. Young adults endorsed more nontraditional views than children and older adults and were more likely than other age groups to indicate that there is no best family type. Children and older adults were more likely than adolescents and young adults to endorse married or living together parents as the best family type. Women and respondents who had experienced parental divorce endorsed traditional views of family less strongly, but women also endorsed stronger expectations for their own family formation. Findings support the possibility of both developmental and sociocontextual influences on attitudes toward family life.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: The article presents the emotional and cognitive experiences of divorced fathers in Israel faced with the need to balance work and family. The analysis is based on in-depth interviews with 22 divorced fathers. The main finding of the study is that divorced fathers face a more intense family–work conflict, which they did not have to contend with as married fathers. Many interviewees reported a shift in the perceived importance of work in their lives. Divorced fathers described their parenting experience as enhanced in comparison to prior married life; many of them felt that after the divorce they became better fathers.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: Divorce has long been described as one of the most stressful life experiences. A review of the literature identified numerous studies that have identified detrimental effects of parental divorce on children and adolescents and few that have emphasized possible optimal implications or effective coping with this event. The focus of this study subsequently fell on how young adults had coped with the divorce of their parents during their childhood or adolescent years. Semistructured retrospective interviews were conducted with 15 participants selected by means of snowball sampling in the completion of this study. Findings revealed a set of themes and subthemes relating to adults’ coping with parental divorce during childhood or adolescence as well as a set of factors that could potentially hinder such coping. Effective communication in relationships was highlighted as a particularly valuable coping method. It is hoped that these insights will enable those involved with assisting families during divorce to cope more effectively with this event.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: One of the most difficult tasks facing expert witnesses (psychologists and psychiatrists) is seeking to reverse parental alienation of long standing when a child has reached adolescence or become an adult. Despite the difficulty, the author describes a strategy that is sometimes effective to make a victim aware of the constancy of the alienated parent’s love, and to provide a rational explanation, via a letter, for the now adult explaining the process of parental alienation.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: Relocation, as an issue in the context of family law, typically involves the proposed move of a separated or divorced parent with a child to a new residence a substantial distance away from the non–moving parent. Based on a comprehensive review of the empirical evidence, 11 studies that focused on relocation within the context of separation and divorce were located, retrieved and appraised based on a common standard for assessing the methodological quality of the studies. Results of the critical appraisal found that the majority of social science research studies on relocation are of poor quality. Overall, the project’s findings demonstrate the need to move away from oversimplified considerations for relocation and to embrace a more comprehensive approach to fully capture the various factors that are relevant when considering the strengths and limitations of relocation.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
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    ABSTRACT: More than 40% of U.S. adults have at least one step-relative in their family. Whereas there is much research on providing support for ex-partners and their children, there has been a lesser focus on trying to keep newly blended families intact. Because many members of a failed relationship repartner and have children from these new relationships, we find there is a need to provide support for stepfamilies. The Survival Strategies Workshop provides advice on strategies for blended families. In this article, we illustrate, through the use of case studies, that most of the problems occurring in blended families are not unique and if appropriate strategies are followed the prospect of a happy future is greatly enhanced.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Divorce & Remarriage