Psychoanalytic Dialogues (PSYCHOANAL DIALOGUES)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

Even in 1991, its initial year of publication, PD was singled out by Newsweek as being at the center of a revitalization of psychoanalytic thinking. "With the infusion of new blood," Newsweek wrote, "a welcome hubbub of lectures, debates and competing ideas is being heard in the analytic marketplace again. Articles and books - many of them by women psychologists - are tumbling off the presses, and adding to the din is a provocative new journal, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, that has been airing fresh views on the relationship between doctor and patient and the psychoanalytic process itself." Since that time, PD has continued to explore the overlapping perspectives that regard relational configurations between self and others, real and fantasied, as the pathway to understanding human motivation and as the locus of psychodynamic explanation. These perspectives grow out of various traditions: interpersonal psychoanalysis; British object relations theories; self psychology; infancy research and child development; and contemporary Freudian thought.

Current impact factor: 0.82

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.75

Additional details

5-year impact 0.79
Cited half-life 8.40
Immediacy index 0.59
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.43
Website Psychoanalytic Dialogues website
Other titles Psychoanalytic dialogues
ISSN 1048-1885
OCLC 20863332
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
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    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Daniel Goldin presents psychological trouble as an opportunity for change. This response to Goldin sees in his work important ideas about how psychoanalysts can respond to the many challenging troubles our profession currently faces. Disruptions in canonical stories can lead to healthy transformations for individuals as well as for psychoanalytic work. The recent Pixar movie Inside Out symbolizes the rethinking of narrative that Goldin has found clinically useful and that has value for our profession.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: In this discussion of Gray's paper I show how he misrepresents the dialogical (Strasberg-Johnstone influenced) tradition of improvisationthe one most commonly in use in psychoanalytic literatureby asserting that its appeal is that analysts could feel in charge by using words to extricate themselves from tight spots (p. 729). In bolstering his argument, Gray completely misrepresents my improvisational episode with a patient named Daryl (Ringstrom, 2007). Having denounced the dialogical approach as essentially stemming from countertransference resistance, Gray then asserts his Meisner-influenced improvisational approach is the one that facilitates psychoanalytic therapy exhibiting Living Truthfully Under Imaginary Circumstances, echoing the title of his paper. By contrast, I show that Gray's three exchange improvisational technique not only does not evince any significant impact on his treatment of his patient Coleen but also bears little resemblance to Meisner's improvisational Repetition Exercise that Gray professes to be copying, or to it exhibiting anything very improvisational in analytic treatment at all.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: I consider first the value of reinstating narrative at the center of the psychoanalytic process. I go on to examine how the analytic field encompasses multiple self-states and multiple cultures in a drive toward unity.I want to begin by expressing my appreciation of the thoughtful commentaries by Joye Weisel-Barth and Susan Bodnar, which offer not so much a criticism of the ideas expressed in this paper as an expansion and gentle questioning of them. I want to thank Weisel-Barth in particular for pointing out that my article was an attempt to pick up a vanishing strain in psychoanalysis. Freud (1913) enjoined his patients to say whatever came to mind, and in turn he would try to listen with even hovering attention in order to sift out the unconscious derivations without prejudice. When intense feelings for the analyst got in the way of what was meant to be a scientific and neutral process, Freud trained his "instrument" on the relationship, and analyzing transference became integral to the method. But the purpose of the enterprise was always to cure through reconstruction, to enable patients to remember rather than to relive. From its inception, the process of psychoanalysis involved piecing together a hitherto unarticulated account of the patients experiences-in short, a narrative. We may no longer believe that we can precisely replicate the past in words, we may no longer trust the objectivity and authority of the analyst, and certainly the drive-conflict genre has lost much of its persuasive power, but when we forget that we are helping people tell their stories, we lose a shared sense of purpose. Few of us come to therapy to have a relationship, although we usually end up in one.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: In this commentary on Daniel Gaztambides "A Preferential Option for the Repressed: Psychoanalysis Through the Eyes of Liberation Theology" we discuss the Ego and the Y(id) to emphasize the otherness of the unconscious. In the idiom of racial anti-Semitism, the Y(id) was the personification of the feminine, the infantile, the irrational, the perverse, the primitive, and of "Blackness." Gaztambide rightly refers to psychoanalysiss marginal and progressive origins and to the role of Freuds own racial identity as a Jew in producing that marginality. However, we caution against Gaztambides metaphorical equation of psychoanalysis and prophecy, and contend that psychoanalysis is at its best when it occupies a position of thirdness, critiquing both from within and without.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: Improvisation in psychoanalysis has heretofore been defined by a theater games model in which the emphasis is on a creative exchange of dialogue. That dialogue focuses on maintaining an established story line. In this paper, I expand the concept of improvisation by drawing on the contributions of Sanford Meisner. In his model, two improvisers through mutual influence maintain affective engagement. Dialogue emerges unpredictably out of that affective engagement and facilitates it. Meisner described this process as "living truthfully under imaginary circumstances." Clinical case material illustrates how a Meisner improvisation can be applied to circumstances in which the analyst is pushed beyond familiar analytic comfort zones. Such an improvisation provides the analyst with an additional resource with which to respond to these challenging moments in ways that facilitate increasing intimacy between patient and analyst. I spell out how a Meisner improvisation impacts therapeutic action in psychoanalysis.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: Coles and Ringstroms discussions of my paper "Living Truthfully Under Imaginary Circumstances: Improvisation in Psychoanalysis" recognize that Meisner improvisation stands in contrast to the dialogic model of improvisation that predominates in psychoanalysis. However, each of these discussants demonstrates several misunderstandings of Meisner improvisation. Mainly, Cole confuses the Meisner repetition exercise with improvisation proper. This is not the case. And Ringstrom, wedded to dialogic improvisation, does not recognize that in the Meisner improvisation it is not words that are improvised but rather the affective engagement. I emphasize that the Meisner improvisation focusing on unpredictable, moment-to-moment, affective engagement provides a model well suited to the goals of the analytic encounter.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: In 2014 NYU Postdoctoral programs created the CERCCL Multiculturalism and Psychoanalysis Award. The inaugural award-winning paper, written by Daniel Gaztambide, and two ensuing commentaries-one by Lew Aron and Karen Starr and one by Annie Lee Jones-are introduced. These papers are presented in the context of the "Whiteness" of most U.S psychoanalytic institutes. The need for ongoing scholarly conversations within psychoanalytic institutes on multiculturalism and psychoanalysis is discussed.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: This paper is a psychoanalytically informed critical race theoretical commentary on Daniel Gaztambides paper, "A Preferential Option for the Repressed: Psychoanalysis Through the Eyes of Liberation Theology," which received the 2014 Multiculturalism and Psychoanalysis Award by the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis Committee on Ethnicity, Race, Culture, Class & Language. This discussion is an attempt to utilize psychoanalytic and literary techniques to explore some of the ways psychoanalysis continues to inscribe cultural practices and normative thinking that foreclose opportunities to expand its margins to be more inclusive. I selected one sentence and used it to suggest how it affected this Black American reader who is also a psychoanalyst.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: Using a dynamic systems contextual model, I expand Daniel Goldins ideas about narrative and the "storied self." I identify two issues that are key to the development of a coherent life story: first, the identification and integration of the multiple psychic self-states and external cultures with which and in which people live, and second, the meeting and melding of important minds in the persons environment.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: When children come to therapy, they come to play. Children organize their experiences by pretending and enacting incidents in the here and now. When adults come to therapy, they come to tell their stories, constructing a unitary, continuous sense of being by matching feelings to events and events to sequences in the immediate medium of anothers mind. In this talk, I will focus on how narrative emerges from breaks in the canonical ways of a culture, whether it is the culture of the home, the workplace, or a way of being together that emerges in the clinical situation. I will look at narrative first from a developmental perspective, considering how children start by describing "timeless" routines of their surround and move only gradually to elaborating particular episodes that have to do with violations of these routines. We will look at telling experiences as falling along a continuum,on one end chaotic and nonlinear, on the other rehearsed and rigidly adhering to a cultural template. We will consider the ideal middle ground of the coherent narrative that remains stable and yet open to revision. We will also examine how an ever-evolving self emerges from this process. Last, we will consider applications of these ideas to the clinical situation, advocating an elaborative rather than an interpretive stance.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: Psychoanalysis's origin as a product of a marginalized peopleJewish women and men in 19th-century Europeis often obscured in contemporary narratives of psychoanalytic history. This history has important relevance for subaltern communitiesespecially people of color in North America. Using Liberation Psychology, Latin American Liberation Theology, Black Theology, and Liberation Philosophy as a composite lens with which to reread the origins of psychoanalysis, it will be argued that imbued within its theoretical machinery is an ethics of otherness, concerned with the outcasts of psyche and society. Examining the intersection of race and marginality in psychoanalysis's origins yields rich possibilities for theorizing about psychodynamics, race, and social justice.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: The author describes his own more expansive application of Sanford Meisners "Repeat Exercise" to psychoanalysis (a) as pertaining conceptually to the entire psychoanalytic situation; (b) as a practical approach to experiencing and observing the relational field, and as such might be useful in training analysts; and (c) as a way to orient the analyst, more like an organizing principle than a strategic tool for particularly problematic moments, for work in the transference/countertransference. The author also argues that the case vignette Dr. Gray presents is an intervention that has some of the effects that can be associated with a mutative interpretation.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: This brief note introduces a memoir by Robert S. Wallerstein, M.D. Wallersteins essay reviews his career, beginning as an internist and soon as a psychiatrist-psychoanalyst. Wallersteins professional account of his development tracks the historical periods within which it unfolded. This reflects his own social and political awareness, which was expressed in the activist spirit that vitalized his work within established medical and psychoanalytic institutions.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: In this response to discussions of my paper, "The Fire of Eros: Sexuality and the Movement Toward Union," I take up considerations of transgression, primitive terror, paradox, containment, and the ecstatic. I clarify that I conceptualize the movement toward union as neither a static state nor the totality of sexuality, but rather as one aspect of erotic experience.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: Reviewing Rundels spectrum model of differentiation-dedifferentiation and its role in sexuality and oceanic experiences, Vaughan discusses another way of conceptualizing Rundels clinical material in terms that do not involve a binary with poles. Using Lakoff and Johnsons work on the body in the mind and on metaphor as arising from properties of the physical and bodily world. In addition, Vaughan notes, the friction produced by the literal and figurative rubbing up against bodies and boundaries in sexuality is partly responsible for the Fire of Eros. In transcendent experiences of sexuality we are at once both most fully ourselves and most interdigitated with and connected to others.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses psychoanalytic psychotherapy with a prodigious artist presenting with a unique form of dissociation involving compulsive nearly continuous travel. Symptoms of insomnia, restless work, and flight originated in traumatic experience from his childhood past and his inherited paternal childhood past in Occupied French North Africa. Faimbergs "telescoping of generations" and Abrahams "phantom" describe disavowed trauma in earlier generations, often grandparents, transmitted unconsciously to children and grandchildren. Family trauma and attendant-buried secrets evade consciousness and resist analytic attention. By recognizing and witnessing his own traumatic inheritance, the analyst successfully negotiated a significant impasse with an approach different from his relatively classical training. A more relational approach, co-constructed by patient and analyst, enhanced the patients experience of being understood. Alternative communication including alterations in the frame, mutual enactment, and analytic witnessing, along with verbal communication, created a more settled frame and deepening of the treatment.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: Rundels paper explores exciting conceptual links between sexuality and experiences conventionally thought of as mystical. Here she makes the convincing argument that sexuality and orgasm are uniquely equipped to produce experiences of dedifferentiation, which can, in turn, lead to radical psychic transformations. I explore this idea to propose that not all sexualities are equally viable candidates for the evocation of dedifferentiated experiences. Transgression is a vital ingredient to that process, and I explain why I think so. I end with suggesting that we have to approach dedifferentiation with measured excitement, as a topos of instability. What can issue from it are not only productive and transformational dysregulations but also self-destructiveness and, at times, more malignant psychotic fragmentations.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues
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    ABSTRACT: This is a personal account of my own voyage of discovery in psychoanalysis, as I have known it over a 64-year period from 1949 to 2013. The happenings described, and my take on them at the time, are as I today remember them, and I think they are true to the facts. I am not as confident about all the dates, though I made a library effort to confirm whenever I had doubts.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Psychoanalytic Dialogues