Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation (J EDUC PSYCHOL CONS)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

This journal serves as a forum for improving the scientific understanding of consultation and the efficacy of consultation to individuals and organizations. Previously, personnel in the wide, interdisciplinary audience reading this journal functioned in parallel rather than interactive ways and were usually unaware of what the other fields were doing to address the same objectives. Providing an outlet for sharing the knowledge and expertise of those working on similar problems, this unique interdisciplinary journal publishes articles that describe formal research, evaluate practices, review relevant literature, discuss salient issues, and carefully document the transition of theory into practice.

Current impact factor: 0.58

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.773

Additional details

5-year impact 0.51
Cited half-life 9.40
Immediacy index 1.33
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.14
Website Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation website
Other titles Journal of educational and psychological consultation (Online), Journal of educational and psychological consultation
ISSN 1047-4412
OCLC 45254801
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: School-wide positive behavior interventions and supports (SW-PBIS) can effectively reduce problem behaviors and simultaneously increase pro-social behaviors in general education settings. SW-PBIS is not a “packaged” intervention, but a framework through which schools create systemic changes for promoting expected behaviors, while also monitoring and intervening with students who have behavior concerns through a tiered model of service delivery. A case study documenting the SW-PBIS implementation process in an alternative educational setting is presented. Alternative schools typically serve students who qualify to receive special education services, have a lower staff-to-student ratio, and often warrant more intensive student interventions as compared to general education settings. These differences from traditional environments pose unique challenges to the SW-PBIS implementation process. Suggestions for neutralizing these challenges such as providing enhanced Tier 1 supports and extensive staff training are explained in depth in this case study.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: Behavioral interventions delivered across home and school settings can promote positive outcomes for youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Yet, stakeholders who deliver these interventions may struggle to implement interventions as intended. Low levels of treatment integrity can undermine potentially positive intervention outcomes. One way to promote implementers' treatment integrity is Implementation Planning, a logistical planning and barrier reduction strategy that is supported by emerging school-based research. The current study extended the research on Implementation Planning and evaluated the effectiveness of the strategy with parents implementing a behavioral intervention at home within a Conjoint Behavioral Consultation model. The behavioral intervention aimed to increase compliance and decrease aggression for two children with ASD at home. Initially, parents struggled to deliver the intervention consistently; however, after Implementation Planning, parents' treatment integrity increased and, subsequently, child outcomes improved. Implications for future research and consultation are presented.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: This is a consensual qualitative research study of the perceptions of university faculty about methods and tools to teach students the professional competency area of school-based psychological consultation, with special attention to cultural competence. The participants (n = 7) included faculty of school psychology programs located in the Northeast, South, Midwest, and Mountain regions of the United States. Participants were from programs serving urban, suburban, and rural settings and represented a wide range of consultation backgrounds, experiences, and theoretical orientation. The analysis revealed three major themes: general coverage of the consultation skills and content, university tension with school setting needs, and specific hurdles and solutions to diversity training. This study also provided ideas on how trainers might overcome some of the barriers to addressing diversity.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: Schools across the nation are implementing innovative practices; however, questions remain regarding how to facilitate quality implementation. Research designs that emphasize high degrees of control over independent variables result in findings with internal validity, but that may not generalize to complex, dynamic educational systems. The purpose of this article is to propose a design research framework as a mechanism for consultants to facilitate and evaluate innovation implementation. Information on design research principles and processes is provided, and issues to consider when applying the framework are discussed. An illustration of how a design research framework was applied in a large-scale initiative to implement and evaluate Response to Intervention (RtI) implementation is also provided. Finally, issues and questions to consider relative to consultants' use of design research principles are explored.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 states that individualized education program (IEP) teams are composed of members with distinct identities, roles, expertise, and histories. Although team members must work together to implement educational and related services for learners with special needs, little is known about how these members actually accomplish this throughout the school year. This study examined the practice of members on two elementary IEP teams through analysis of data from a yearlong case study using the communities of practice (CoP) framework. Contrary to idealized conceptualizations of IEP team practice as being equitable and occurring in meetings, the practice of members on both teams was controlled by a few team members and occurred during concise exchanges throughout the day. These findings underscore opportunities for innovating the practice of IEP team members to improve services for students with special needs.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: A tiered response model for social-emotional learning (SEL) is needed to address the significant mental health needs of young people in this country. In collaboration with other school mental health professionals, school psychologists have a unique expertise that situates them to be systems change agents in this work. This article describes a pilot project that focused on augmenting existing SEL services with SEL assessment within a tiered system of support in one elementary school. Using a consultation-based model grounded in principles of empowerment evaluation, an interdisciplinary school team used SEL data collected during one school year to inform the delivery of SEL interventions and supports. Data from SEL, academic, and behavioral assessments were examined retrospectively to illustrate the potential value of integrating assessments and interventions across domains. The discussion offers implications for ongoing efforts to develop and implement tiered response models through interdisciplinary collaboration among school mental health professionals.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: Since its inception, large-scale school reform has been an integral part of the U.S. educational system. Although school reform is commonplace, educators continue to grapple with how to bring about effective systems-level change. School-based consultants (e.g., school psychologists) are in an ideal position to help facilitate the implementation and evaluation of systems-level reform to ensure substantive change (see Illback, 2014). However, there is a paucity of research on how school psychologists can serve as systems-level consultants to actualize reform. Therefore, the purpose of this double issue is to identify high-quality research that demonstrates the implementation of school-based, systems-level reform in which school psychologists were instrumental in working with other professionals. The articles represent a wide range of school reforms that are occurring across diverse school contexts and collectively address implications for future research, training, and practice.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews Check-In, Check-Out (CICO; Hawken & Horner, 200319. Hawken, L., & Horner, R. (2003). Evaluation of targeted intervention within a schoolwide system of behavior support. Journal of Behavioral Education, 12, 225–240.View all references) as an intervention within a multitiered system of support. Although literature has emerged demonstrating successful intervention outcomes for a wide range of students (e.g., Campbell & Anderson, 201110. Campbell, A., & Anderson, C. M. (2011). Check-In/Check-Out: A systematic evaluation and component analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 4, 315–326.View all references; Hawken & Horner, 200319. Hawken, L., & Horner, R. (2003). Evaluation of targeted intervention within a schoolwide system of behavior support. Journal of Behavioral Education, 12, 225–240.View all references), insufficient attention has focused on the administrative and organizational systems needed for high-fidelity, sustained adoption of these practices to maximize student outcomes. We address this need by demonstrating how to explicitly and systematically embed CICO into the multitiered system of supports by reviewing data, systems, and practices needed to sustain high-quality Tier 2 interventions such as CICO. One school district's systems implementation data and student outcome data are shared highlighting lessons learned during training, initial implementation, and follow-up related to CICO systems in schools. The article emphasizes the roles of school psychologists as well as the importance of collaboration with other educators in CICO implementation.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: School psychology has recently reconceptualized its service provision model to include multitiered systems of academic and psychosocial promotion, prevention, and intervention. The availability of evidence-based programs and advances in school consultation theory accompany the paradigm shift of the field. Despite these advances, implementing multitiered systems of support into school settings is teeming with challenges and often results in program abandonment. One often cited reason for such failures is the inattention to local priorities and culture. This article discusses the use of the participatory culture-specific intervention model (Nastasi, Moore, & Varjas, 200416. Nastasi, B. K., Moore, R. B., & Varjas, K. M. (2004). School-based mental health services: Creating comprehensive and culturally specific programs. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.View all references) to build comprehensive systems of support in an elementary school in New Orleans. Co-authored by both researcher-consultants and school administrators, the article highlights the research, consultation, intervention, and collaborative decision-making activities over a 4-year period in a continuing university–school partnership. The discussion focuses on the process, challenges, and successes in consulting to build multitiered systems of support.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: Current educational reform mandates the implementation of school-based models for early identification and intervention, progress monitoring, and data-based assessment of student progress. This article provides an overview of interdisciplinary collaboration for systems-level consultation within a Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) framework. The roles of school psychologists and school-based administrators are presented in relation to the implementation of MTSS practices within an implementation science model. The training and expertise of each discipline are highlighted related to respective aspects of implementation drivers (i.e., competency, organization, leadership). Functions of principals and school psychologists during team-based, problem-solving MTSS practices are described based on a problem-solving framework consistent with school-based consultation. Future directions for graduate training of school psychologists and principals and directions for consultation research are provided.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: In this article we illustrate the roles of school psychologists, administrators, social workers, teachers, and parents in school reform by describing the adoption, initial implementation, and formative evaluation of an evidence-based social and emotional learning (SEL) program within several rural Midwestern school districts in a geographically large county. As part of a countywide initiative aimed at improving children's mental health services, an interdisciplinary team collaborated to select and implement a universal school-based curriculum addressing SEL objectives. Professionals in the county's special education cooperative lead the reform effort, general education teachers deliver the curriculum, and school psychologists and school social workers have served as trainers and consultants to educators and building administrators. An ecological model of organizational consultation informs these efforts. We illustrate this model by describing its application to the collaborative school-based initiative addressing SEL objectives. We also discuss implications for future consultation research, training, and practice.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
  • Article: A Thank You

    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation (JEPC) is beginning its second quarter century of publication. Given the challenges education faced in 1990, when the journal began publishing, and the evolving challenges of 2015, it became important to answer two questions: (1) Has JEPC successfully contributed to the facilitation of service delivery leading to improved outcomes? (2) What major challenges should JEPC consider—in an era of diminishing school budgets, professional autonomy, and social safety nets—to ensure that it can help to meet the needs of struggling learners, their fellow students, and the people and organizations who work on their behalf? To help answer these questions, this article discusses JEPC's contributions to consultation, current and future challenges, and possible directions for meeting the current and future needs of struggling learners, their peers, and all other stakeholders to which JEPC has dedicated itself.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: The process of implementation has been of increasing interest to researchers and practitioners who want to bring research-based programs and practices to organizational settings such as schools. This commentary article addresses the factors critical to implementation of multitiered systems of supports (MTSS). Practice issues of importance to implementation of MTSS include: recognition of the complexity of the implementation process, use of data-based intervention and implementation decision making, the importance of interdisciplinary cooperation and leadership, and provision of ongoing technical assistance. The need for better specification of implementation strategies and identification of core implementation components are suggested as essential to advancing research-based knowledge in this area.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation
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    ABSTRACT: The authors in this special issue on systems-level consultation provide an excellent range of models for how school psychologists can work as system-level consultants within the various communities they serve. This article (a) provides commentary on the four articles in this special issue focused on systems-level consultation to serve diverse populations in schools, (b) outlines 10 competencies for systems consultants in diverse schools, and (c) suggests directions for future research, theory, and practice in this area. By intersecting the 2010 National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Practice Model, Blueprint III, and the illustrations in these four articles, 10 competencies for systems-level consultants are articulated. These involve collaborative, recursive, interpersonal processes whereby the systems-level consultant facilitates communication and understanding across different stakeholders, assisting in the joint gathering and interpretation of data. In systems-level consultation, the system is the client and consultants work to build capacity within the system and its stakeholders to address problems and needs.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation