Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (Operat Tech Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg)

Publisher: WB Saunders

Journal description

This large-size, atlas-format journal presents detailed illustrations of new surgical procedures and techniques in otology, rhinology, laryngology, reconstructive head and neck surgery, and facial plastic surgery. Feature articles in each issue are related to a central theme by anatomic area or disease process. The journal will also often contain articles on complications, diagnosis, treatment or rehabilitation. New techniques that are non-operative are also featured.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery website
Other titles Operative techniques in otolaryngology--head and neck surgery
ISSN 1043-1810
OCLC 19336708
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

WB Saunders

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject-based repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/07/2015
    • 'WB Saunders' is an imprint of 'Elsevier'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Laryngeal paragangliomas are rare tumors that arise from three superior and one inferior paraganglia within the larynx. They present as painless, submucosal masses that become symptomatic after they surpass a critical size. At this point, hoarseness followed by dysphagia will become evident. These tumors are rarely familial and rarely, if at all, malignant.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vagal paragangliomas are nonchromaffin tumors that originate from paraganglionic chemoreceptor cell bodies associated with the Vagus Nerve. Although both, surgical excision and radiation therapy have been reported to be effective treatment modalities, the effectiveness of one over the other remains unclear. There are several surgical approaches that have been described. As with any surgical disease, the utility of one technique over another has been justified at some point in time. Clearly there has been a shift away from the more radical approaches with the primary goal of surgery being complete extirpation of the tumor along with avoidance of iatrogenic cranial neuropathies and preservation and restoration of cranial nerve function. In addition, early rehabilitation of speech and swallowing dysfunction results in improved functional outcomes and reduced hospital stay and morbidity.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Treatment options for benign paragangliomas (PG) include surgery, radiotherapy (RT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and observation. Patients who are elderly, infirm, and have a limited life expectancy may be followed. This is also a reasonable option for younger, healthier patients who have no evidence of progression on serial computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients who require intervention are treated with either RT (45 Gy/25 fractions) or SRS (12.5 to 15 Gy) if resection would result in significant morbidity such as permanent cranial nerve deficits. The probability of tumor stabilization or regression after RT or SRS exceeds 95% and the probability of a significant complication is remote.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The prerequisites for surgical resection of tumours arising in the jugular foramen are adequate access, control of the major vessels and the ability to move the facial nerve safely out of the operative field if necessary. Without it the surgeon risks catastrophic haemorrhage, cranial nerve palsies that might have been avoided and insufficient access to remove the whole tumour. The aim of this paper is to help the surgeon select the best approach for their patient and summarise the key steps in each. Consideration of a staged approach is prudent for paragangliomas that have significant intracranial extension, Fisch Di tumours. Paragangliomas confined to the temporal bone and intimately related to the internal carotid artery, Fisch C2-4, are better resected through a type A infratemporal fossa approach. Small jugular paragangliomas, Fisch C1, can be removed using a Fallopian bridge technique though limited re-routing of the facial nerve may sometimes be required.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Address reprint requests and correspondence: David Myssiorek, MD, FACS, NYU Clinical Cancer Center, 160 E34th St, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10016.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tympanic paragangliomas (TP) arise in the middle ear along the course of Jacobson’s or Arnold’s nerve. These lesions can vary from small masses on the cochlear promontory to tumors that extend into the mastoid and external auditory canal. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for TP with very low recurrence rates. The various surgical approaches for TP are adapted to the configuration of individual tumors to provide adequate exposure to the margins of the tumor in the mesotympanum, hypotympanum and mastoid. Utilizing these surgical approaches in combination with meticulous dissection and hemostasis with adjunctive tools such as laser and micro-bipolar instruments allows for safe and effective resection of these vascular tumors from within the confines of the tympanic cavity.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The vast majority of paragangliomas are benign. It is unclear what percentage is malignant but it has been estimated between six and 10% of those reported. Despite their distinct radiologic and pathologic appearance there is no reliable way to distinguish benign from malignant paragangliomas preoperatively. There are no absolute pathologic criteria for malignancy. The accepted criteria for determining malignancy preoperatively are spread to regional lymph nodes or distant metastasis. There are predictors of malignancy. They include location of the paraganglioma (vagal paragangliomas are malignant more often than any other paraganglioma), pain as a presenting symptom , recent rapid growth and the SDHB mutation.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An understanding of the vascular architecture of paragangliomas can aid in both diagnosis and treatment. There is a growing role for vascular evaluation and intervention of these highly vascular tumors. This article addresses the specifics of the vasculature of paragangliomas, with focus on preoperative imaging, preoperative balloon test occlusion and endovascular embolization. The authors present both common and improvised techniques.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Address reprint requests and correspondence: Ottavio Piccin, MD, Department of Otolaryngology, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, Bologna 40138, Italy.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Address reprint requests and correspondence: Nico de Vries, MD, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
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    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Address reprint requests and correspondence: Ozlem E. Tulunay-Ugur, MD, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W Markham St., Slot 543, Little Rock, AR 72205.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It is generally accepted that obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) results from the combination of a structurally small upper airway and abnormal airway collapsibility during sleep. Treatment of OSA, therefore, is directed at preventing airway collapse. For those patients who do not respond to conservative medical management such as positional therapy and weight loss, or are unable to tolerate or comply with positive pressure ventilation (continuous positive airway pressure, bilevel positive airway pressure, and other modalities) or mandibular advancement devices, surgical intervention remains the last option. Surgical treatments that target tongue base and hypopharyngeal collapse traditionally included partial glossectomy, midline glossectomy, linguoplasty, mandibular osteotomy with genioglossus advancement, and maxillary-mandibular advancement. Many of these procedures are associated with extreme morbidity and are not readily accepted by patients as treatment options. In search of minimally invasive alternatives, otolaryngologists began looking at other potential methods of anterior displacement and stabilization of the base of tongue.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Surgical technique for maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) to improve obstructive sleep apnea is discussed in this article. Surgically advancing the maxillomandibular complex by at least 1. cm provides tension on the soft tissues in the airway from the soft palate to the base of the tongue, widening the pharynx in the anteroposterior dimension, but most importantly laterally. The tissues would no longer be able to collapse and obstruct the pharynx. Postoperative polysomnography in patients who have MMA is comparable to that of patients using continuous positive airway pressure therapy appropriately. Primary surgical MMA is highly efficacious. More long-term studies are needed for validating this valuable surgical alternative to continuous positive airway pressure therapy.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Surgical interventions for the upper airway have long been a part of treatment algorithms for sleep-disordered breathing. Genioglossus advancement is one such procedure designed to specifically treat obstructed breathing related to hypopharyngeal collapse. The procedure involves surgical manipulation of the genioglossus muscle's attachment to the mandible. The result is reducing obstruction at the hypopharynx and tongue base by displacing this musculature anteriorly. The last 30 years have introduced variations of the procedures and further explored the relevant anatomy. Although there is a paucity of high-level evidence, studies have shown promising outcomes when the procedure is tailored to those with appropriate anatomy and pathophysiology.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery