Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals (Health Promot J Aust)

Publisher: Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals; Australian Health Promotion Association, CSIRO Publishing

Journal Impact: 1.22*

*This value is calculated using ResearchGate data and is based on average citation counts from work published in this journal. The data used in the calculation may not be exhaustive.

Journal impact history

2016 Journal impact Available summer 2017
2015 Journal impact 1.22
2014 Journal impact 1.06
2013 Journal impact 1.10
2012 Journal impact 0.96
2011 Journal impact 1.12
2010 Journal impact 0.90
2009 Journal impact 1.17
2008 Journal impact 0.93
2007 Journal impact 2.63
2006 Journal impact 0.37

Journal impact over time

Journal impact
Year

Additional details

Cited half-life 5.90
Immediacy index 0.20
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Health Promotion Journal of Australia website
ISSN 1036-1073
OCLC 37169607
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

This publication is classified Romeo Green.
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Publications in this journal

  • P. Duley · J. R. Botfield · T. Ritter · [...] · A. Brassil
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Aboriginal youth in Australia often experience high rates of intimate partner violence (family violence) and poorer reproductive and sexual health than their non-Aboriginal counterparts. To address some of the disparities, the Strong Family Program was developed to deliver reproductive and sexual health education to Aboriginal communities in New South Wales.Methods: Development of the program was based on an extensive consultation process with Aboriginal communities. It was implemented in three communities, with two groups from each hosting Aboriginal youth and Elders in a yarning circle within the culturally respectful frameworks of 'men and boys'' and 'women and girls'' business. An evaluation was conducted to measure reproductive and sexual health knowledge and attitude changes upon program completion, using pre- and post-program surveys and yarning (focus group discussions).Results: Program participants comprised 48 females and 28 males. Overall, mean knowledge and attitude scores improved upon completion of the program (from 77% to 82% and from 4.15 to 4.32 out of 5, respectively). Among participants aged 20 years and under (the youngest participant was 13 years), there was an increase in knowledge (P=0.034); among participants aged over 20 years (the oldest participant was 78 years), there was an increase in positive attitudes (P=0.001). Participants perceived the information provided to be useful and relevant, with many reporting improved knowledge and attitudes around rights and respectful relationships.Conclusions: Reproductive and sexual health education in Aboriginal communities should be based on community consultations and carried out within a culturally appropriate framework to promote greater success. Continued implementation of the Strong Family Program will promote increased understanding of respectful relationships and improved health outcomes for Aboriginal young people.So what?: The Strong Family Program was based on an extensive consultative process that ensured leadership and involvement from Aboriginal communities, with program content and delivery based on Aboriginal pedagogy and reflecting Aboriginal cultural values. Reproductive and sexual health promotion in Aboriginal communities should be based on community consultations and carried out within a culturally appropriate framework to promote greatest success.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: The study aim was to investigate the relationships between social capital measures and playgroup participation in a local residential area for parents with children of playgroup age (1-4 years) compared with non-participation and participation in a playgroup outside the local residential area. Research indicates playgroup participation has benefits for families, however, less is known about the potential local community social capital for parents who participate in playgroups.Methods: Data were collected through a cross-sectional survey from March 2013 to January 2014 in Perth, Western Australia. The data from a group of parents (n=405) who had at least one child aged between 1 and 4 years were analysed using multivariable regression. Reported playgroup participation (local, outside the area or non-participation) in the previous 12 months was investigated for associations with three measures (Neighbourhood Cohesion Index, Social Capital and Citizenship Survey and local reciprocity) that capture attributes of social capital.Results: Participation in playgroup locally was generally associated with higher levels of social capital than both participation in playgroup outside the local area and non-participation. Mothers with two or more children fared better for social capital measures than mothers with one child.Conclusions: Participation in a locally placed playgroup may provide an important opportunity for families with children of playgroup age (1-4 years) to build social capital in their local community.So what?: Playgroups in a family's local area have the potential to foster locally placed social capital through community interaction, social networks and cohesion, which are important for mental health promotion in communities.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Diabetes is associated with significant depression, which can result in poorer clinical outcomes, including increased mortality. Little is known about the prevalence of depression among Torres Strait Islander adults with diabetes.Methods: Self-reported depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 translated into Torres Strait Creole, and associations with socioeconomic, behavioural and clinical indicators in Torres Strait Islander adults with diabetes in five remote Torres Strait Islands were examined.Results: Seventy-three men and 115 women completed interviews. The median PHQ-9 score was 5.5 (IQR 0-7); 42% of respondents scored 0-4 (none-minimal), 46% scored 5-9 (mild) and 12% scored 10+ (moderate-severe). Mean HbA1c was 8.3% (67.4mmol). HbA1c was not related to PHQ-9 scores (β=0.20, P=0.323), however exercise in hours (β=-0.34, P<0.001) and screen time in hours (β=0.11, P<0.001) were significant predictors of depression after adjusting for other study variables.Conclusions: This sample of remote living Torres Strait Islanders reported relatively low rates of depression compared with national samples, and depression was not related to glycaemic control. Exercise and screen time were the strongest predictors of depression based on PHQ-9 scores. This represents an opportunity for health promotion.So what?: These findings provide an indication of the health impact of physical activity in rural and remote communities. Local health and education services, councils and sporting bodies should work collaboratively to promote sustainable physical activity programs.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Local governments are uniquely placed to influence the food environment of their communities through healthy eating policies (HEPs) but very few have done so. Methods: Using a community-based participatory approach, Healthy Eating Local Policies and Programs built the capacity of South Australian local governments to develop and implement a HEP by leading the development of a HEP framework then mentoring local governments to develop their own local policy tailored to their community. Results: Over a 2-year period, 31 of the 68 local governments worked towards developing a HEP, with 14 receiving endorsement by December 2013. Conclusions: Local governments are ready to model healthy eating practices and adopt healthy eating policy that supports the health of their communities. A HEP developed using a participatory approach and with the flexibility to be tailored to local preferences and demographics appears feasible, although the process may be lengthy. This process and outcome appears applicable and transferable to other local governments. So what?: As local governments take up their responsibilities in promoting health and wellbeing, HEPs provide important structural mechanisms to enable councils to facilitate healthy eating in their local communities.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Whether the website Veggycation® appeals to particular groups of consumers significantly more than other groups. Methods: Australian adults aged �18 years (n = 1000) completed an online survey. The website evaluation instrument used was tested for validity and reliability. Associations between demographic variables and website evaluation dimensions of attractiveness, content, user-friendliness and loyalty intentions were examined using a general linear model (GLM). The appraisal of the website was further investigated based on the respondents’ daily consumption level of vegetables and the importance they attach to vegetable consumption in their diet, using GLM and a Tukey’s all-pair comparison. Results: Veggycation® has a high level of acceptance among the Australian community with certain groups evaluating the website more favourably. These include women, people aged�29 years, higher income respondents, non-metro respondents and those who viewed vegetables as extremely important in their daily diet. Conclusions: Customisation of the website for consumer groups with low vegetable consumption is recommended. Designing tailored communication tools will assist in enhancing the knowledge base of vegetable-related health benefits and may promote vegetable consumption among the Australian population. So what? The promotion of higher vegetable consumption is aided by tailored, well-designed web communication. This study adds to the existing body of knowledge for the education of organisations developing e-tools for promoting health education and literacy.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Screening for cancer of the cervix, breast and bowel can reduce morbidity and mortality. Low participation rates in cancer screening have been identified among migrant communities internationally. Attempting to improve low rates of cancer screening, the Ethnic Communities Council of Queensland developed a pilot Cancer Screening Education Program for breast, bowel and cervical cancer. This study determines the impact of education sessions on knowledge, attitudes and intentions to participate in screening for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities living in Brisbane, Queensland.Methods: Seven CALD groups (Arabic-speaking, Bosnian, South Asian (including Indian and Bhutanese), Samoan and Pacific Island, Spanish-speaking, Sudanese and Vietnamese) participated in a culturally-tailored cancer screening education pilot program that was developed using the Health Belief Model. A pre- and post-education evaluation session measured changes in knowledge, attitudes and intention related to breast, bowel and cervical cancer and screening. The evaluation focussed on perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness and the target population's beliefs about reducing risk by cancer screening.Results: There were 159 participants in the three cancer screening education sessions. Overall participants' knowledge increased, some attitudes toward participation in cancer screening became more positive and intent to participate in future screening increased (n=146).Conclusion: These results indicate the importance of developing screening approaches that address the barriers to participation among CALD communities and that a culturally-tailored education program is effective in improving knowledge, attitudes about and intentions to participate in cancer screening.So what?: It is important that culturally-tailored programs are developed in conjunction with communities to improve health outcomes.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Rates of sexually transmissible infections among young people are high, and there is a need for innovative, youth-focused sexual health promotion programs. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Sharing Stories youth theatre program, which uses interactive theatre and drama-based strategies to engage and educate multicultural youth on sexual health issues. The effectiveness of using drama-based evaluation methods is also discussed.Methods: The youth theatre program participants were 18 multicultural youth from South East Asian, African and Middle Eastern backgrounds aged between 14 and 21 years. Four sexual health drama scenarios and a sexual health questionnaire were used to measure changes in knowledge and attitudes.Results: Participants reported being confident talking to and supporting their friends with regards to safe sex messages, improved their sexual health knowledge and demonstrated a positive shift in their attitudes towards sexual health. Drama-based evaluation methods were effective in engaging multicultural youth and worked well across the cultures and age groups.Conclusions: Theatre and drama-based sexual health promotion strategies are an effective method for up-skilling young people from multicultural backgrounds to be peer educators and good communicators of sexual health information. Drama-based evaluation methods are engaging for young people and an effective way of collecting data from culturally diverse youth.So what?: This study recommends incorporating interactive and arts-based strategies into sexual health promotion programs for multicultural youth. It also provides guidance for health promotion practitioners evaluating an arts-based health promotion program using arts-based data collection methods.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Musculoskeletal conditions are highly prevalent, affecting 28% of the Australian population. Given the persistent nature of many musculoskeletal conditions self-management is recognised as an important aspect of effective disease management. However, participant recruitment and retention for formal self-management programs is a challenge.Methods: Arthritis SA (Arthritis Foundation of South Australia, a non-profit community health organisation) redesigned a shorter, community-orientated self-management education program delivered by health professionals. The program utilises aspects of the Stanford model of chronic disease self-management and motivational interviewing as well as principles of adult learning to create an effective learning environment. The program aims to guide participants to learn and practise a range of pain management strategies that are known to be effective in improving quality of life. This study used a pre- and post-test (at 6 weeks) design to determine whether this program achieved benefits in self-reported health outcomes. Outcomes that were measured included pain, fatigue, health distress, self-efficacy and communication.Results: A response rate of 47% (n = 102) was achieved and small but statistically significant improvements in mean [s.d.] pain scores (6.1 [2.3] to 5.4 [2.4], P = 0.001), health distress (2.3 [1.3] to 2.0 [1.3], P = 0.002) and self-efficacy (6.2 [2.1] to 6.8 [2.2], P = 0.002) were found.Conclusion: Community-based participants of this shorter, focused program recorded small but significant improvements in self-reported pain, health distress and self-efficacy. For those who completed the current program, Arthritis SA is currently exploring the potential of developing a booster session to promote sustainable positive health outcomes.So what?: Supporting self-management through education is recognised as important but also as a key challenge for effective management of musculoskeletal conditions. Using a pre-post evaluation design, this study demonstrated effectiveness (short-term improvements for self-reported pain, health distress and self-efficacy) for a redesigned and shortened community-targeted program focusing on musculoskeletal pain.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Unwanted sexual attention and unhealthy intimate relationships have the potential to have serious negative health consequences. To date, there has been scant focus on these issues among university students in Australia. The aim of the current study was to describe the extent of unwanted sexual attention and unhealthy intimate relationships experienced in their lifetime by female university students aged 18-25 years.Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken involving 465 female students aged 18-25 years. Students were recruited through one faculty within a Victorian university and invited to complete an anonymous online questionnaire.Results: Sixty-seven per cent (n = 312) of female students reported experiencing unwanted sexual attention in their lifetime. The most common form of unwanted sexual attention was kissing or touching over clothes (98%; n = 306). Over 43% (n = 124) of the female students reported that the experience of unwanted sexual experience occurred after their protests were ignored. Thirty per cent (n = 135) of the female students reported experiencing at least one element of an unhealthy intimate relationship.Conclusions: The high rates of unwanted sexual attention and unhealthy intimate relationships among female university students is of concern given the negative impact such events can have on individual's physical, emotional and social well being.So what?: Public health and health promotion action is required to prevent female students from experiencing unwanted sexual attention and unhealthy intimate relationships, and to address the negative health and well being consequences.
    Article · May 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Local governments are uniquely placed to influence the food environment of their communities through healthy eating policies (HEPs) but very few have done so. Methods: Using a community-based participatory approach, Healthy Eating Local Policies and Programs built the capacity of South Australian local governments to develop and implement a HEP by leading the development of a HEP framework then mentoring local governments to develop their own local policy tailored to their community. Results: Over a two-year period, 31 of the 68 local governments worked towards developing a HEP, with 14 receiving endorsement by December 2013. Conclusions: Local governments are ready to model healthy eating practices and adopt a healthy eating policy that supports the health of their communities. A HEP developed using a participatory approach and with the flexibility to be tailored to local preferences and demographics appears feasible, although the process may be lengthy. This process and outcome appear applicable and transferable to other local governments. So what? As local governments take up their responsibilities in promoting health and well-being, HEPs provide important structural mechanisms to enable councils to facilitate healthy eating in their local communities.
    Article · May 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Methods are needed to accurately measure and describe behaviour so that social marketers and other behaviour change researchers can gain consumer insights before designing behaviour change strategies and so, in time, they can measure the impact of strategies or interventions when implemented. This paper describes a photographic method developed to meet these needs.Methods: Direct observation and photographic methods were developed and used to capture food-selection behaviour and examine those selections according to their healthfulness. Four meals (two lunches and two dinners) were observed at a workplace buffet-style cafeteria over a 1-week period. The healthfulness of individual meals was assessed using a classification scheme developed for the present study and based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines.Results: Approximately 27% of meals (n = 168) were photographed. Agreement was high between raters classifying dishes using the scheme, as well as between researchers when coding photographs. The subset of photographs was representative of patterns observed in the entire dining room. Diners chose main dishes in line with the proportions presented, but in opposition to the proportions presented for side dishes.Conclusions: The present study developed a rigorous observational method to investigate food choice behaviour. The comprehensive food classification scheme produced consistent classifications of foods. The photographic data collection method was found to be robust and accurate. Combining the two observation methods allows researchers and/or practitioners to accurately measure and interpret food selections. Consumer insights gained suggest that, in this setting, increasing the availability of green (healthful) offerings for main dishes would assist in improving healthfulness, whereas other strategies (e.g. promotion) may be needed for side dishes.So what?: Visual observation methods that accurately measure and interpret food-selection behaviour provide both insight for those developing healthy eating interventions and a means to evaluate the effect of implemented interventions on food selection.
    Article · May 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals