Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals (Health Promot J Aust)

Publisher: Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals; Australian Health Promotion Association, CSIRO Publishing

Current impact factor: 0.59

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 5.90
Immediacy index 0.20
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Health Promotion Journal of Australia website
ISSN 1036-1073
OCLC 37169607
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

CSIRO Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal repository or institutional repository
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • Joos Meyer · Karim Johnson · Joshua Bowyer · Josephine Muir · Angus Turner
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Indigenous Australians are 14 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to develop diabetic retinopathy (DR). Blindness can be prevented in 98% of cases if DR is identified and treated early. While the National Health and Medical Research Council recommend annual screening for Indigenous Australians, screening attendance rates remain low. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a targeted health promotion intervention improved patient compliance and screening rates.Methods: Bad Sugars, Bad Eyes - a culturally appropriate video targeting DR awareness and the importance of screening among Indigenous Australians - was developed at the Lions Eye Institute, Western Australia. The study used a patient questionnaire pre and post viewing of the video, as well as semi-structured interviews with Aboriginal Health Workers, to explore the influence the resource had on patient knowledge and attitudes. Eighty-four participants, currently involved in DR screening programs, were recruited from Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS) and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS).Results: The video was found to increase patient knowledge about key DR issues as well as alter patient attitudes identified as potential barriers to screening. The areas most affected by the video resource were knowledge of recommended screening intervals, the severity of potential visual complications if DR is left undiagnosed and untreated and that screening is needed even when asymptomatic. Aboriginal Health Workers positively evaluated the video, all rating it as 'very' culturally appropriate, understandable and relatable.Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that Indigenous DR screening attendance rates could be increased through the expanded use of this video.So what?: Indigenous DR screening attendance rates remain low, despite annual recommendations by the National Health and Medical Research Council. This gap needs to be addressed.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Research has shown that Australian university students consume alcohol at a higher level than their peers from the general population and are therefore more likely to witness and experience alcohol-related harm. This study measured the prevalence of alcohol consumption among 18-24-year-old university students and the association between alcohol consumption and witnessed and experienced harms.Methods: A random cross-sectional sample of university students aged 18-24 years (n = 2466) was recruited via the University Survey Office and through random intercept at campus market day. All participants completed an online survey that included the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, Alcohol Problems Scale and an additional scale measuring witnessed harm.Results: Principal Components Analysis revealed three factors within the Alcohol Problems Scale; i.e. Criminal and Aggressive Behaviour, Health and Emotional Harms and Sexual Harms. Students who consume alcohol at high-risk levels were significantly more likely to score highly on each factor, 1.6 times more likely to experience harm and 1.1 times more likely to witness harm than students who consume alcohol at low-risk levels.Conclusions: The positive association between alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm supports previous findings. This study adds previous research through the categorisation of harm into factors.So what?: Integrated and comprehensive interventions addressing alcohol consumption among young university students that are informed by evidence-based research can be tailored to ensure that they meet the needs of the target group.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Over the last three decades there has been an incremental investment in health promotion and prevention across Australia; yet, the Commonwealth Government and some state/territory governments have more recently instigated funding cuts in health promotion and prevention. This paper argues that the role of health promotion is critical in contemporary Australia and discusses strategies needed to move forward within the context of recent disinvestments.Discussion: Key areas of concern relating to recent health promotion and prevention disinvestment in Australia include the abolishment of the Australian National Preventive Health Agency, the cessation of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health and significant cuts to Indigenous programs. These changes pose a significant threat to the health, economic and social well being of Australians and the region, particularly those that are most vulnerable.Conclusions: Future health promotion and prevention efforts will require strategic leadership and action to enhance the promotion of health equity in Australia over the coming decades. We call on governments to (re)invest in health promotion and prevention both in and outside the health sector so that health promotion professionals can continue their advocacy efforts aimed at articulating their professional place in improving population health.So what?: Recent changes to national health promotion and prevention policy are detrimental to the health and well being of the Australian population, particularly those most vulnerable. Sound planning to revitalise and refocus health promotion action in Australia is urgently required.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Alcohol-related harm is an issue of concern for African migrant communities living in Australia. However, there has been little information available to guide workers in developing culturally sensitive health promotion strategies.Methods: A three-step approach, comprising a literature review, community consultations and an external review, was undertaken to develop a guide to assist organisations and health promotion groups working with African migrant communities to address alcohol-related harms.Discussion: There was a high level of agreement between the three steps. Addressing alcohol harms with African migrant communities requires approaches that are sensitive to the needs, structures and experiences of communities. The process should incorporate targeted approaches that enable communities to achieve their resettlement goals as well as strengthening mainstream health promotion efforts.Conclusions: The resource produced guides alcohol harm prevention coalitions and workers from the first steps of understanding the influences of acculturation and resettlement on alcohol consumption, through to planning, developing and evaluating an intervention in partnership with communities.So what?: This paper advances knowledge by providing a precise summary of Australian African migrant focused alcohol and other drug research to date. It also describes a three-step approach that aimed to incorporate a diversity of community views in the creation of a health promotion and community capacity-building resource.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
  • Michelle S. Fitts · Gavan R. Palk

    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    ABSTRACT: Chapter 4.7 of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research refers specifically to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It lays out the points at which researchers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders must consider their approach, and the engagement with individuals, communities or groups who are involved in or affected by their research. History, of Australia and of research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, has informed this approach. The response to that history has been a rational, institutionalised, systematic demand for a different perception of what should direct research and research processes to ensure engagement with and service to the community with whom the researchers wish to do the work. This paper considers whether these principles could inform the approach to other research work.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    ABSTRACT: The lack of a common description makes measuring the concept of quality of life (QoL) a challenge. Whether QoL incorporates broader social features or is attributed to health conditions, the diverse range of descriptions applied by various disciplines has resulted in a concept that is multidimensional and vague. The variety of theoretical conceptualisations of QoL confounds and confuses even the most astute. Measuring QoL in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is even more challenging. Instruments commonly developed and used to measure QoL are often derived from research methodologies shaped by Western cultural perspectives. Often they are simply translated for use among culturally and linguistically diverse Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This has implications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations whose perceptions of health are derived from within their specific cultures, value systems and ways of knowing and being. Interconnections and relationships between themselves, their communities, their environment and the natural and spiritual worlds are complex. The way in which their QoL is currently measured indicates that very little attention is given to the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' beliefs or the ways in which those beliefs shape or give structure and meaning to their health and their lives. The use of Indigenist or Indigenous methodologies in defining what Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples believe gives quality to their lives is imperative. These methodologies have the potential to increase the congruency between their perceptions of QoL and instruments to measure it.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    ABSTRACT: Health promotion does not have a code of ethics, although attempts have been made to assist practitioners in their understanding and application of ethical concepts. This article describes and analyses one such attempt, sustained from 2006 to 2014 in rural South Australia. The attempt comprised capacity-building activities that were informed by principles of organisational change management, especially the principle of creating champions. The article also presents a framework (largely comprising ethical questions) that may help practitioners as a prompt and guide to ethical reflection. The framework was developed to be as accessible as possible in light of the diverse educational backgrounds found in rural settings. Finally, the article highlights some philosophical dimensions to the framework and defends its role, proposing that ethical reflection is integral to good practice and never simply the province of theorists. The article does all this with a view to stimulating discussion on how to increase the frequency and quality of ethical reflection undertaken by health promotion practitioners.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    ABSTRACT: The intersectoral and interdisciplinary nature of health promotion gives rise to ethical questions. This is because health promotion depends upon alliances between people who often have different perspectives on what matters in particular cases or different visions of the good society. This paper draws on the ambivalent relationship that health promoters can have with biomedicine to illustrate and explore the nature of these ethical questions. Examples from everyday life are used to underline the familiar nature of the kinds of coalitions and compromises that are needed to work alongside others with different values to oneself. It is suggested that analogous kinds of compromise are needed in health promotion and that this requires a form of 'diplomatic ethics' for health promoters that, in turn, raises questions about their ethical integrity.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: Health promotion practitioners have important roles in applying ecosystem approaches to health and actively promoting environmental sustainability within community-level practice. The present study identified the nature and scope of health promotion activities across Australia that tackle environmental sustainability.Methods: A mixed-method approach was used, with 82 participants undertaking a quantitative survey and 11 undertaking a qualitative interview. Purposeful sampling strategies were used to recruit practitioners who were delivering community-level health promotion and sustainability programs in Australia. The data were analysed thematically and interpretation was guided by the principles of triangulation.Results: Study participants were at various stages of linking health promotion and environmental sustainability. Initiatives focused on healthy and sustainable food, active transport, energy efficiency, contact with nature and capacity building.Conclusion: Capacity building approaches were perceived as essential to strengthening this field of practice. Healthy and sustainable food and active transport were suitable platforms for simultaneously promoting community health and sustainability. There was potential for expansion of programs that emphasise contact with nature and energy issues, as well as interventions that emphasise systems thinking and interdisciplinary approaches.So what?: It was promising that Australian health promotion programs have started to address complexity rather than single issues, as evidenced by explicit engagement with environmental sustainability. However, more effort is required to enable a shift towards ecosystem approaches to health.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals
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    ABSTRACT: Health promotion researchers must consider the ethics of their research, and are usually required to abide by a set of ethical requirements stipulated by governing bodies (such as the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council) and human research ethics committees (HRECs). These requirements address both deontological (rule-based) and consequence-based issues. However, at times there can be a disconnect between the requirements of deontological issues and the cultural sensitivity required when research is set in cultural contexts and settings etic to the HREC. This poses a challenge for health promotion researchers who must negotiate between meeting both the requirements of the HREC and the needs of the community with whom the research is being conducted. Drawing on two case studies, this paper discusses examples from cross-cultural health promotion research in Australian and international settings where disconnect arose and negotiation was required to appropriately meet the needs of all parties. The examples relate to issues of participant recruitment and informed consent, participants under the Australian legal age of consent, participant withdrawal when this seemingly occurs in an ad hoc rather than a formal manner and reciprocity. Although these approaches are context specific, they highlight issues for consideration to advance more culturally appropriate practice in research ethics and suggest ways a stronger anthropological lens can be applied to research ethics to overcome these challenges.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals