Computer Assisted Language Learning (Comput Assist Lang Learn)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

Distance learning and learning by computers are prevalent these days. Computer Assisted Language Learning puts you in touch with the increasingly interdisciplinary and international research community.

Current impact factor: 0.92

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 6.40
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Computer Assisted Language Learning website
Other titles Computer assisted language learning (Online)
ISSN 0958-8221
OCLC 42207192
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
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    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
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    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: With the advent of touch-screen interfaces on the tablet computer, multisensory elements in reading instruction have taken on a new dimension. This computer assisted language learning research aimed to determine whether specific technology features of a tablet computer can add to the functionality of multisensory instruction in early reading acquisition. The effects of multisensory elements from the different modalities (letter card and iPad) on bilingual readers' natural abilities to blend and segment non-words were compared. The quasi-experimental post-test study involved 56 high- and low-ability Malay–English Grade 2 students. Multisensory-based materials to build and to break apart non-words in both letter card and iPad modalities were experimented. The results indicated no significant difference in the effect of the multisensory modalities on blending and segmenting tasks. As both conventional letter cards and touch-screen tablet computers produced similar outcomes, the practical implication is that both are equally adequate for providing the multisensory component in multisensory instruction. The writing systems (Malay and English), the type of tasks (blending and segmenting), and extreme groups (high- and low-performing) did not moderate the effects of the multisensory modalities.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports on an exploratory study that investigated the effect of extensive speaking practice on the development of L2 speaking complexity, accuracy, and fluency in voice blogging. The participants were 30 college EFL (English as a foreign language) learners in Taiwan. As a supplement to the insufficient speaking practice in class, each week over a semester, the participants were required to speak on a topic, record their speaking, and post it onto a class blog outside of class. In addition, they were required to listen to and provide comments on at least one other student's voice blog post every week. Blog posts from the first two and last two weeks were analyzed and compared for complexity (mean number of clauses per AS-unit, mean length of AS-unit, mean length of clause, modified type-token ratio), accuracy (percentage of error-free AS-units, percentage of error-free clauses, percentage of accurate use of grammatical verb forms), and fluency (number of syllables per minute, number of meaningful syllables per minute). Results showed that the participants made an improvement in their speaking complexity (greater mean length of AS-unit and clause) although no such improvement was made in their speaking accuracy and fluency.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to determine if language acquisition can occur in a virtual situation in the absence of explicit instruction. After spending 1 year establishing a virtual community, the authors observed and analyzed interpersonal interactions and the development of Chinese communication competence, communication models, and interaction frequency. The results revealed that (1) language acquisition can be improved autonomously in a virtual situation; (2) communication competence occurs in a loop of processes that include receiving, exploring, dialogue, assimilation, adaptation, asking questions, problem solving, and conversation; (3) social interactions and a friendly environment are the most crucial factors in a virtual community; (4) community consensus, individual motivation, individual personalities, speaking behaviors, language competence, and leading techniques affect how individuals develop communication competence.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: Oral production is an important part in English learning. Lack of a language environment with efficient instruction and feedback is a big issue for non-native speakers’ English spoken skill improvement. A computer-assisted language learning system can provide many potential benefits to language learners. It allows adequate instructions and instant feedback to the student, thus it facilitates self-study and encourages interactive use of the language. In this paper, we analyse Chinese college students' speaking requirements first, and then based on these requirements and usability criteria, a detailed description of an oral skills development system is provided. In this system, supported by Automatic Speech Recognition technology, special interactive activities and feedback forms were designed and a prototype was set up and tested to verify the effectiveness of this proposal.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: Wikis provide users with opportunities to post and edit messages to collaborate in the language learning process. Many studies have offered findings to show positive impact of Wiki-based language learning for learners. This paper explores the effect of collaborative task in error correction for English as a Foreign Language learning in an online (Wiki) language exchange programme (Chinese and English) between China and the UK. The current study was conducted with students studying an English module at an international university, China. They worked with students studying a Chinese language course at a university in the UK on a collaborative writing project. The results indicate that learners provided positive comments on using Wikis for collaborative learning to practise their language skills, particularly with specifically designed tasks integrated into their language courses. Students enjoyed correcting language errors for each other on the Wiki. In addition, the results suggest that students improved their writing skills.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports on students’ use of face-to-face synchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) for oral language learning. It describes a university English language class designed to prepare students for overseas study in which a Skype-based English conversation school was piloted. The study offers analysis of how students used the CMC language school in a relatively uncontrolled setting using qualitative data collected from a student survey and quantitative data collected over a 12-week trial period. Motivational aspects of using technology and online chat to study English are generally considered to be high but speaking face-to-face online is not for everyone. The speaking project, although new and exciting initially, did not hold most students' attention throughout the project possibly due to few specific tasks and goals. For motivation to be maintained by students, oral CMC projects should be based on an effective pedagogy that includes concrete tasks and specific goals. This finding validates other research where CMC was used in the classroom. The paper concludes with a discussion of reasons for the lack of student enthusiasm toward the project centering on task-based learning, use of social media for schoolwork in addition to motivational and autonomous learning factors.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigates the different learning opportunities enabled by text-based and video-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) from an interactionist perspective. Six Chinese-speaking learners of English and six English-speaking learners of Chinese were paired up as tandem (reciprocal) learning dyads. Each dyad participated in four kinds of interactions, namely, English text-based SCMC, Chinese text-based SCMC, English video-based SCMC and Chinese video-based SCMC. Their use of communication strategies (CSs) were analyzed along with an after-task questionnaire and with stimulated reflection to explore systematically and comprehensively the differences between text-based and video-based SCMC. In addition to the main role of qualitative analysis, the quantitative analysis was undertaken to provide an overview of the relative frequencies of the occurrence of the different strategies and to understand their distribution in the different conditions. A MANOVA was applied to understand to what extent the differences are likely to have occurred by chance. The results showed that learners used CSs differently in text-based and video-based SCMC and indicated different learning opportunities provided by these two modes of SCMC. While text-based SCMC appears to have greater potential for learning target-like language forms, video-based SCMC seems particularly effective for fluency development as well as pronunciation improvement.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: This study examines the frequency and usage patterns of linking adverbials in Korean students' essay writing in comparison with native English writing. The learner corpus used in the present study is composed of 105 essays that were produced by first-year university students in Korea. The control corpus was taken from the American LOCNESS sub-corpus. The distribution of the different semantic categories was nearly identical in the Korean writing and the American writing. The additive relation was most frequently used, followed by the causal, adversative, and sequential relations. However, the Korean learners' overall overuse of linking adverbials pervaded all the semantic categories. Their overuse was particularly noticeable in the sequential and additive categories. Accordingly, the analysis showed that overuse hypothesis is clearly supported in the present study. On the basis of the results of the study, pedagogical implications and suggestions for further research are presented.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: Social networking has compelled the area of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) to expand its research palette and account for new virtual ecologies that afford language learning and socialization. This study focuses on Busuu, a social networking site for language learning (SNSLL), and analyzes the views of language that are enacted through the semiotic design of this participatory online environment. The study draws on methodological principles of multimodality to examine the website and data collected through auto-ethnographic accounts of the researcher, who participated as a member of the Busuu community for 10 weeks. Results indicate that Busuu is an ecological system composed of nested sub-systems that reflect structural, interactional, and ecological views of language that interweave in conflicting and complementary ways. Suggestions to improve SNSLLs concern the need to reach alignment in terms of the theoretical and pedagogical tenets that underscore the design of instructional materials. Implications pinpoint the potential of intersecting multimodality and CALL in the study of participatory online environments.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to explore the structural relationships among the variables of EFL (English as a foreign language) learners' perceptual learning styles and Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Three hundred and forty-one (n = 341) EFL learners were invited to join a self-regulated English pronunciation training program through automatic speech recognition (ASR) computer system. Participants were asked to actively undertake the interactions with ASR-based computer-assisted pronunciation training (CAPT) on a daily basis for three months. They were directed to finish a questionnaire on their perceptual learning style and technology acceptance. The collected data were analysed with descriptive statistics and structural equation model to investigate the structural relationships. Results show that most participants were visual learners; furthermore, no significant relationship between any type of perceptual learning style and perceived usefulness was discovered. Visual style as well as kinaesthetic style was found to be significantly influential to perceived ease of use which further significantly led to perceived usefulness. Perceived usefulness was significantly related to attitude of using the system that was decisive to EFL learners' continuing use of ASR-based CAPT.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: Research has shown that any assumption that L2 learners of English do well to rely on the feedback provided by generic spell checkers (for example, the MS Word spell checker) is misplaced. Efforts to develop spell checkers specifically for L2 learners have focused on training software to offer more appropriate suggestion lists for replacing misspellings, but research suggests that students often select the wrong word from such lists. Moreover, since their spelling errors are often competence errors arising from misconceptions about the target language, students might benefit from feedback that addresses the underlying problem rather than simply suggesting the correct word. This article describes the use of a corpus of learner English to identify common misspellings produced by Spanish learners of English. For each of these errors, hand-crafted feedback has been written explaining how the correct spelling is consistent with the orthography or morphology of English. This material has been incorporated into a prototype spell checker for learners of English. Meanwhile, the software simply flags other errors as “not amongst the 90,000 commonest words of English”. Because it also detects unusual bigrams (word pairs), the program finds more spelling errors than generic spell checkers and additionally detects some non-spelling errors. Tests indicate that such easy-to-build spell checkers might become useful tools for L2 learners, and, along with other recent technological developments, suggest that student self-correction of compositions (including grammatical and lexical errors as well as spelling errors) is becoming increasingly feasible.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: The documentation of the benefits of blog use in foreign language education has proliferated since 2006. In the field of blogging to write, most studies focus on learners' linguistic performance and perceptions. To provide an analysis of learners' writing performance by using blogs, in addition to the often-researched areas, this study examines two further dimensions – learners' metalinguistic awareness and affective performance. This paper reports findings in these two areas. Twenty-six randomly selected, non-English majors participated in a conventional English writing class, forming the control group, while 18 students took part in a blog-integrated English experimental writing class. The results of comparison showed no significant differences between the two classes in regards to metalinguistic strategy use but there were significant differences in metalinguistic awareness. It is conjectured that more exposure to the target language materials, the interaction and collaboration among students, the aid of the reverse-chronological order of blogs, and the integration of blogs in the writing class significantly enhanced students' metalinguistic awareness. In affective performance, there were no significant differences between the two classes in writing motivation and writing anxiety. Nevertheless, it was the control class that significantly surpassed the experimental class in writing self-efficacy.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: Videoconferencing tools, like Skype, etc., are being increasingly used in language education worldwide. Despite assumed socio-affective and pedagogical benefits of using webcams in synchronous online language lessons, such as the feeling of co-presence or the possibilities of non-verbal communication, little is known about attitudes held by experienced online teachers towards webcams and their actual use of this tool during private online language lessons. This study interviews 20 experienced online language tutors and 20 adult students about their attitudes towards webcams and their use of webcams. The findings suggest that most teachers and students only used webcams at the start of their lessons for socio-affective reasons and discontinued the use of webcams after the first 2–3 weeks. Some common reasons for reducing the use of webcams were the perception of ‘webcamming’ as a more tiring mode, the feeling of self-consciousness and privacy concerns. The study calls for more research on the use of webcams, webcam-specific semio-pedagogical skills and suggests directions of future studies.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents a review of the literature that examines WebQuests as tools for second-language acquisition and foreign language-learning processes to guide teachers in their teaching activities and researchers in further research on the issue. The study first introduces the theoretical background behind WebQuest use in the mentioned processes. It then reviews studies that examine WebQuests as tools used in second-language acquisition and foreign language-learning processes. The study concludes that WebQuest use improves interaction, communication, critical thinking, knowledge application, social skills, scaffolded learning, higher order thinking skills and problem-solving skills. Moreover, WebQuests help learners to acquire and learn linguistic and extra-linguistic knowledge in a secure atmosphere in the processes of second-language acquisition and foreign language learning. Second, the results of the reviewed studies show that WebQuests have positive effects on reading skills and vocabulary knowledge. The paper ends with practical recommendations for teachers and researchers.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Computer Assisted Language Learning