The International Journal of Human Resource Management (INT J HUM RESOUR MAN)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

The International Journal of Human Resource Management is the forum for HRM scholars and professionals world-wide. Concerned with the expanding role of strategic human resource management in a fast-changing global environment, the Journal focuses on future trends in HRM, drawing on empirical research in the areas of strategic management, international business, organisational, personnel management and industrial relations. The International Journal of Human Resource Management encourages strategically focused articles on a wide range of issues including employee participation, human resource flow, reward systems and high commitment work systems. The Journal aims to address major issues arising from: internationalisation of market integration. increased competition. technological change. new concepts of line management. changing corporate climates.

Current impact factor: 0.93

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.83

Additional details

5-year impact 1.65
Cited half-life 6.80
Immediacy index 0.09
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.39
Website International Journal of Human Resource Management website
Other titles International journal of human resource management (Online)
ISSN 0958-5192
OCLC 37786903
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is a study surrounding the interplay between Human Resource Management (HRM) and knowledge transfer within an emerging institutional petro-state. It seeks to link HRM and knowledge transfer through individual-level mechanisms in response to the recent calls for more research on micro-foundations. Our findings provide empirical evidence for HRM-related factors influencing knowledge exchange in a sample of 815 employees in the national context of the UAE. We found that individual-level perceptions and extrinsic motivation have a positive impact on knowledge exchange; however, we found evidence to suggest only an indirect effect of individual perceptions of organisational commitment to knowledge exchange, via individual intrinsic motivation and social interaction. Unlike some existing accounts from the Western world, individual perceptions of organisational commitment to knowledge sharing had no direct positive impact on knowledge exchange – an issue that may be ascribed to the distinct institutional setting of the UAE. This paper adds to the existing literature on HRM and knowledge exchange by bringing to bear new evidence from a Middle Eastern emerging market setting – an area thus far relatively neglected in the literature.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: This article explores the relationship between Arabic culture and employees’ perceptions of performance appraisal in a Saudi Arabian company named SACO. Using an interpretive and qualitative methodological framework, the article suggests that Western models of performance appraisal rooted in rationality and objectivity conflict with aspects of Saudi Arabian culture. Specifically, the personal relations implicated in the social practice of Wasta. However, the article also shows how SACO employees are beginning to reject Saudi Arabian cultural norms and adopt alternative values which are linked to notions of organisational justice and individual egalitarianism. These values are compatible with Western models of performance appraisal.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: Drawing on the ability–motivation–opportunity (AMO) framework, this study investigated how and when high-involvement human resource management practices (HI HRM practices) influence worker creativity. Using a sample of 3316 production-line workers from 240 manufacturing companies in South Korea, we found that (a) a bundle of HI HRM practices was positively related to individual worker creativity, (b) learning orientation strengthened the positive relationship between the HI HRM practices and worker creativity and (c) intrinsic job motivation mediated these relationships. Such findings suggest that the HI HRM practices have significant cross-level impact on individual intrinsic job motivation and creativity at work.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: Using a sample of workers and managers employed by a hotel located in Southeastern People’s Republic of China, we investigated the relationship between various human resource management practices and the perceived organizational support (POS) experienced by the employees. We then investigated the effects of POS on employee satisfaction. Our data suggest that hiring practices, training, and compensation practices predict POS. These results are consistent with previous research. We also found that POS influences worker satisfaction and acts as a mediator between select HR practices and satisfaction. This study contributes to the literature by replicating Western-based findings with a Chinese sample and illustrating that the attitudes of Chinese employees can be influenced through the use of HR practices.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: Prediction of protean and physical boundaryless career attitudes (organizational mobility preference) was investigated through two work cognitions: work importance and work alternatives. Regulatory focus theory served to explore mediation effects in these predictive relations. Respondents were 336 engineers and computer scientists employed in Israel’s hi-tech industry in a post-organizational downsizing period. Results of the direct model showed that perceptions of work importance were related to protean career attitude and not to physical boundaryless career attitude, while perceived work alternatives were related to both career attitudes, but more to the physical boundaryless. The mediated model showed that the promotion motive predicted increase and the prevention motive predicted decrease in both career attitudes, implying that both were triggered more by motives for opportunities and gains than by fears. These results contribute to knowledge on career self-management in the context of repeated organizational downsizings, and underscore the importance of designing human resource career policies that consider employees’ work values and work alternatives.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: Using the customer-orientated bureaucracy (COB) construct, this qualitative study investigates changes to the Human Resource (HR) function’s status in eight Scottish voluntary organisations delivering public services at a time of contradictory government calls for greater customer service (personalisation) and cost control (austerity). HR attempts to build and sustain social orders that encourage worker commitment to customer service, leading to business facing and ‘business partner’ strategic roles in areas of recruitment and skills. The study, however, challenges the ability of unitarist ‘business partner’ HR roles to resolve emerging organisational tensions concerning industrial relations, worker concerns over their own security, lack of opportunities to up-skill and service quality. It further questions whether the HR function can be strategic in this and other COB contexts as it can be powerless to resolve workplace tensions because its own status is undermined by budget cuts by government and it faces challenges to its expertise from internal and external actors such as consultants and customers.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: Multinational organisations of all kinds face growing challenges to ensure that their international operations and staff are safe from threat of physical and psychological danger. This is particularly acute in the international aid and development sector, where expatriate field staff are both valuable and vulnerable, and where organisations often confront limited infrastructure and financial resources. This paper reports an empirical study exploring the ways in which 10 international non-government organisations from 5 nations (USA, UK, Germany, Switzerland, Australia), all with substantial experience operating in high-risk contexts, manage the safety and security of their expatriate staff. Our results unearth four areas where these organisations seek to build in-house competence, centred on culture building, and supported by a suite of human resource practices relating to people services, information services and communication services. These competencies coalesce around an overarching philosophy towards safety and security that we describe as ‘personal responsibility and empowerment’.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: Extant literature on person–environment fit has underlined the positive impact of leader–member exchange (LMX) on person–supervisor (PS) fit. We challenge this assumption and propose that LMX, which captures the working relationship between employees and their managers, is more strongly associated with person–organization (PO) fit, not PS fit. We further propose that the personal aspect of the relationship between employees and their managers, namely supervisor–subordinate guanxi, is more strongly associated with PS fit than LMX. Finally, we theorize that LMX and supervisor–subordinate guanxi will be associated with turnover intention and helping behavior targeting the supervisor, respectively, through their differential impact on PO and PS fit. Data collected from 267 leader–member dyads in 17 companies in China using a two-wave procedure supported our hypotheses. These results have implications for theories on the multi-dimensional nature of the person–environment fit as well as research differentiating LMX and supervisor–subordinate guanxi.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: As downsizing and restructuring have become global phenomena, the impact of job insecurity on employee attitudes has received significant attention. However, research examining the role of cultural dimensions has been largely unexplored. Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, we investigated whether the relationships between both quantitative job insecurity (i.e. the perceived threat of job loss) and qualitative job insecurity (i.e. the perceived threat of losing valued job features) and employee attitudes (job satisfaction and turnover intention) differ in culturally distinct regions. This was examined using representative employee samples from two regions of Switzerland which differ in societal practices uncertainty avoidance and performance orientation: the German-speaking (n = 966) and the French-speaking (n = 307) regions. Our research indicates that whereas the relationship between quantitative job insecurity and turnover intention is stronger in the French-speaking region where there is higher societal practice uncertainty avoidance, the relationship between qualitative job insecurity and job satisfaction is stronger in the German-speaking region where there is higher societal practice performance orientation.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: Many employers seek flexibility through part-time or temporary employment to achieve improved competitiveness and success. Using strategic choice theory, this study is a longitudinal examination of employers’ strategic decisions of reducing labour costs and using part-time or temporary workers on workplace performance. Workplace performance is measured through profitability, productivity and change in net operating revenue. Statistics Canada’s Workplace and Employee Survey longitudinal workplace data are used for the analysis. Results show that reducing labour costs strategy has no effect on profitability, productivity or change in net operating revenue, and using part-time or temporary workers strategy shows decreased profitability and productivity, and that there is no effect on the change in net operating revenue in Canadian workplaces studied. Based on these findings, we recommend that employers, in Canada and elsewhere, not only carefully weigh reducing labour costs and employing part-time or temporary workers strategies for workplace performance, but also reconsider such strategies and instead seek alternative means of improving workplace performance.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: Adopting the view that career development can be influenced by the organization, the present study outlines employer initiatives aimed at developing careers of employees with a disability. More specifically, through 17 in-depth interviews – across five states in India – with human resource personnel in companies known for good policies in hiring people with disabilities, the study outlines how employers have helped and continually aim to help those with a disability attain career success through certain human resource philosophies and practices. The present study complements prior research which has noted barriers to career success and outlines how employers and human resource practitioners can help develop careers of employees with a disability.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: Although the literature on human resource management (HRM) has provided compelling evidence that certain HRM practices can help employees attain the competence and confidence to carry out their role, less is known about the potential impact of HRM practices on volunteers in the context of non-profit organisations. This study addresses this gap by presenting a model that situates role mastery – operationalised as role clarity and self-efficacy – as its centrepiece. Our model suggests that role mastery leads to commitment to the volunteer organisation and that role mastery can be achieved through training and supportive relationships with paid staff. A dual-mediation analysis of survey data from a humanitarian non-profit organisation in the UK (n = 647) supported our theoretical model. We contribute to volunteering theory and practice by identifying tools that non-profit organisations can employ to maximise the role mastery and commitment of volunteers.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management
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    ABSTRACT: This paper highlights the interaction between intended human resource (HR) practices as perceived by supervisors and status similarity between supervisors and employees as a key source of variation in employee work engagement among 298 employees reporting to 54 supervisors at a luxury Chinese hotel. Using a multi-level, process-oriented approach to examine the relationship between intended HR practices by supervisors and engagement as perceived by employees, we show (1) that the interaction of supervisor perceptions of HR practices and supervisor–subordinate hukou (place of origin) status similarity is positively related to employee reports of Leader–member exchange (LMX), HR practices and work engagement; (2) that the interaction of supervisor perceptions of HR practices and hukou status similarity influences employee perceptions of HR practices through LMX; and (3) that the interaction of supervisor perceptions of HR practices and hukou status similarity influences work engagement through employee perceptions of LMX and HR practices. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Journal of Human Resource Management