European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (EUR J CLIN NUTR)

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

Journal description

All aspects of human nutrition: Basic and theoretical studies Clinical and metabolic studies Epidemiological and social aspects Nutritional determinants to growth and development Relations of function to nutritional status Nutritional causes and effects of disease Community nutrition and education.

Current impact factor: 2.71

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.709
2013 Impact Factor 2.95
2012 Impact Factor 2.756
2011 Impact Factor 2.462
2010 Impact Factor 2.561
2009 Impact Factor 3.072
2008 Impact Factor 2.686
2007 Impact Factor 2.326
2006 Impact Factor 2.116
2005 Impact Factor 2.163
2004 Impact Factor 2.132
2003 Impact Factor 1.864
2002 Impact Factor 1.943
2001 Impact Factor 1.765
2000 Impact Factor 2.171
1999 Impact Factor 1.668
1998 Impact Factor 1.67
1997 Impact Factor 1.261
1996 Impact Factor 1.094
1995 Impact Factor 1.26
1994 Impact Factor 1.121
1993 Impact Factor 0.904
1992 Impact Factor 0.895

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.99
Cited half-life 9.10
Immediacy index 0.56
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 0.98
Website European Journal of Clinical Nutrition website
Other titles European journal of clinical nutrition, EJCN
ISSN 0954-3007
OCLC 17616551
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Nature Publishing Group

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 6 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Authors retain copyright
    • Published source must be acknowledged and DOI cited
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's personal website and institutional repository
    • If funding agency rules apply, authors may post authors version to their relevant funding body's archive, 6 months after publication
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Nature Publishing Group'
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background/Objectives: Evidence-based practice guidelines are available to assist in the decision making for nutrition interventions in patients with head and neck cancer. Re-assessment of guideline recommendations is important with changing demographics, new treatment regimens, advancing radiotherapy techniques, such as helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and the emergence of new literature. The aim of this study was to validate the updated high-risk category definition in our local hospital protocol for the swallowing and nutrition management of patients with head and neck cancer to determine the ongoing predictive ability for identifying proactive gastrostomy requirement in a new cohort.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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    ABSTRACT: Background/Objectives: Maternal vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy may influence offspring kidney health. We aimed to examine the associations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) blood levels during fetal life with kidney outcomes at school age. Subjects/Methods: This study was embedded in a population-based prospective cohort study among 4212 mother–child pairs. We measured maternal second trimester (18–25 weeks) and fetal cord blood (at birth) 25(OH)D levels. At a median age of 6.0 years, we measured children’s combined kidney volume, glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from creatinine and cystatin C serum levels, and microalbuminuria from albumin and creatinine urine levels. Results: Of all mothers, 21.9% had severely deficient levels (25(OH)D <25.0 nmol/l), 25.7% had deficient levels (25.0–49.9 nmol/l), 25% had sufficient levels (50.0–74.9 nmol/l) and 27.4% had optimal levels (greater than or equal to75.0 nmol/l). Maternal 25(OH)D levels were not consistently associated with childhood combined kidney volume. Higher maternal 25(OH)D levels were associated with lower childhood eGFR (difference −0.94 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (95% confidence interval, −1.73; −0.15) per 1 standard deviation (s.d.) increase in 25(OH)D). Maternal 25(OH)D levels were not associated with microalbuminuria. Cord blood 25(OH)D levels were not associated with childhood kidney outcomes. The associations of maternal 25(OH)D levels with childhood eGFR were partly explained by childhood vitamin D status. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that maternal 25(OH)D levels during pregnancy may influence childhood kidney outcomes. These results should be considered hypothesis generating. Further studies are needed to replicate the observations, to examine the underlying mechanisms and to identify the long-term clinical consequences.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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    ABSTRACT: Background/objectives: The pathogenesis of enteritis after abdominal radiotherapy (RT) is unknown, although changes in fecal microbiota may be involved. Prebiotics stimulate the proliferation of Lactobacillus spp and Bifidobacterium spp, and this may have positive effects on the intestinal mucosa during abdominal RT. Subjects/methods: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving patients with gynecological cancer who received abdominal RT after surgery. Patients were randomized to receive prebiotics or placebo. The prebiotic group received a mixture of fiber (50 inulin and 50% fructo-oligosaccharide), and the placebo group received 6 g of maltodextrin twice daily from 1 week before to 3 weeks after RT. The number of bowel movements and stool consistency was recorded daily. Diarrhea was evaluated according to the Common Toxicity Criteria of the National Cancer Institute. Stool consistency was assessed using the 7-point Bristol scale. Patients' quality-of-life was evaluated at baseline and at completion of RT using the EORTC-QLQ-C30 (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life Questionnaire C30) test. Results: Thirty-eight women with a mean age of 60.3±11.8 years participated in the study. Both groups (prebiotic (n=20) and placebo (n=18)) were comparable in their baseline characteristics. The number of bowel movements per month increased in both groups during RT. The number of bowel movements per day increased in both groups. The number of days with watery stool (Bristol score 7) was lower in the prebiotic group (3.3±4.4 to 2.2±1.6) than in the placebo group (P=0.08). With respect to quality-of-life, the symptoms with the highest score in the placebo group were insomnia at baseline and diarrhea toward the end of the treatment. In the prebiotic group, insomnia was the symptom with the highest score at both assessments, although the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Prebiotics can improve the consistency of stools in gynecologic cancer patients on RT. This finding could have important implications in the quality-of-life of these patients during treatment.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 25 November 2015; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2015.192.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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    ABSTRACT: Background/Objectives: Anthropometry for measuring body composition, shape, surface area and volume is important for human clinical research and practice. Although training and technical skills are required for traditional tape and caliper anthropometry, a new opportunity exists for automated measurement using newly developed relatively low-cost three-dimensional (3D) imaging devices. The aim of this study was to compare results provided by a Kinect-based device to a traditional laser 3D reference system.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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    ABSTRACT: Background/objectives: We aimed to quantify the association of sarcopenia with length of hospital stay (LOS) and to identify factors associated with sarcopenia among hospitalized patients. Subjects/methods: A total of 655 patients composed the study sample. A longitudinal study was conducted in a University Hospital. Sarcopenia was defined, according to European Consensus criteria, as low muscle mass (bioelectrical impedance analysis) and low muscle function (handgrip strength). Logistic regression, Kaplan-Meier and Cox adjusted proportional hazards methods were used. LOS was determined from the date of hospital admission and discharge home (event of interest). Results: Participants were aged 18 to 90 years (24.3% sarcopenic). Factors associated with sarcopenia were male gender, age ⩾65 years, moderate or severe dependence, undernutrition and being admitted to a medical ward. Sarcopenic patients presented a lower probability of being discharged home (hazard ratio (HR), 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.71, 0.58-0.86). However, after stratifying for age groups, this effect was visible only in patients aged <65 years (HR, 95% CI= 0.66, 0.51-0.86). Moreover, sarcopenic overweight or obese patients presented a higher probability of being discharged home (HR, 95% CI=0.78, 0.61-0.99) than nonoverweight sarcopenic patients (HR, 95% CI=0.63, 0.48-0.83). Conclusions: Being male, age ⩾65 years, presenting dependence, being undernourished and admitted to a medical ward were factors associated with sarcopenia among hospitalized adult patients. Sarcopenia is independently associated with longer LOS, although this association is stronger for patients aged <65 years. Moreover, sarcopenic overweight was associated with a higher probability of discharge home than nonoverweight sarcopenia.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 16 December 2015; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2015.207.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the mental health and psychological functioning of bariatric patients before surgery, and after 1 year and 10 year follow-ups, and compared them with participants in a dietary program. Such long follow-up is rare, but strongly recommended by the American Association of Bariatric Surgeons. Thirty-six bariatric surgery patients and 34 participants of a weight loss program were weighed and assessed at all 3 points in time. Participants were administered the mental health inventory, neuroticism, sense of control and fear of intimacy scales. Along with these mental and psychological measurements, the medical outcome short form (SF-36) was used. The surgery group achieved successful weight loss outcomes (27% reduction of pre-operative weight) after 10 years and better than baseline health-related quality-of-life scores. However, their general mental health, neuroticism, sense of control and fear of intimacy scores showed significant deterioration in comparison to pre-operative levels after 10 years. The dietary group participants remained psychologically stable among all three points in time. This study highlights the importance of identifying a risk group among bariatric patients for which the dietary and psychological follow-up may be of special significance.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 22 July 2015; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2015.112.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to ascertain the effect of weight loss over the course of 1 year on 5-year mortality in old nursing home (NH) residents in different classes of body mass index (BMI). A longitudinal study was conducted on 161 NH residents aged ⩾70 years at the Istituto di Riposo per Anziani, Padova, Italy. Data were collected using a comprehensive geriatric assessment at baseline and at a 1-year follow-up visit. Mortality was recorded over a 5-year follow-up. We divided our sample into four groups using as cutoffs a BMI of 25 and a weight gain or loss of 5% at 1 year (BMI ⩾25 and weight stable/gain, BMI ⩾25 and weight loss, BMI<25 and weight stable/gain and BMI <25 and weight loss). People with a BMI ⩾25 and weight loss suffered the worst decline in activities of daily living, whereas those with a BMI <25 and weight loss had the most significant decline in nutritional status, which coincided with the worst decline in the Multidimensional Prognostic Index among the groups whose weight changed. Compared with those with a BMI ⩾25 and weight stable/gain (reference group), those with a BMI <25 were at the highest risk of dying (in association with weight loss: hazard ratio HR=3.60, P=0.005; in association with weight stable/gain: HR=2.45, P=0.01), and the mortality risk was also increased in people with a BMI ⩾25 and weight loss (HR=1.74, P=0.03). In conclusion, weight loss increases the mortality risk in frail, disabled NH residents, even if they are overweight or obese.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 11 March 2015; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2015.19.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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    ABSTRACT: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition is a high quality, peer-reviewed journal that covers all aspects of human nutrition.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · European Journal of Clinical Nutrition