International Journal of the History of Sport (Int J Hist Sport)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

The International Journal of the History of Sport is acknowledged as a leading journal in the field of the historical study of sport in its political, cultural, social, educational, economic, spiritual and aesthetic dimensions. The journal offers a forum to anthropologists, sociologists, historians and others who seek to explore the relationship between sport and society in a historical context.

Current impact factor: 0.26

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 5.40
Immediacy index 0.17
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website International Journal of the History of Sport website
Other titles The International journal of the history of sport
ISSN 0952-3367
OCLC 16314947
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite frequent claims that invasive methods of sex verification and early procedures for doping detection were used in 1966 and 1967 at different major international sport competitions, little is known about the origins and rationales for implementing such procedures. This paper focuses on the drug testing and sex verification protocols implemented at the 1967 Pan-American Games held in Winnipeg. Specifically, it explores the conditions that led to these protocols, as well as the details of and the arguments invoked for their implementation. To do so, archival material, media coverage featured in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish newspapers and magazines across the Americas, and oral histories are analyzed and discussed. The paper demonstrates that neither the sex verification nor the drug testing protocol was mandatory for all athletes and only two very specific groups of athletes were targeted. It also demonstrates that in the case of the former, exceptions were made within the specific group targeted. The paper concludes that the rudimentary protocols applied at the 1967 Pan-American Games likely informed the IOC Medical Commission’s doping and sex-testing policies implemented at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics and Grenoble Winter Olympics.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this paper is to reflect on what appears to be the relatively under-used methodologies associated with oral history – principally the interview as a primary source of data – in the writing of sports history. The observation is acknowledged as one made from a UK perspective, not least on account of the authors’ status as monolingual researchers, albeit from the different but culturally diverse nations of England and Scotland. The points of reference within this article are, therefore, necessarily drawn from works published in English, and the substantive oral history case studies are mostly sampled from those researched in the UK to date, chosen because they are either groundbreaking or illustrative of the opportunities, methodological challenges and politics that have come to be associated not only with the method itself, but the discipline of sports history. This paper will, therefore, firstly outline the development of oral history. Secondly, it will discuss the ways in which it has been applied within British sports history and, finally propose opportunities it presents for the future development of the discipline and those historians researching sport.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: This paper identifies where sport history’s treatment of literature intersects with established literary critical perspectives and briefly highlights discipline-specific methodologies that can open up new lines of inquiry for historians interested in literature and sport.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: This essay describes a plan for investigating the cultural meanings of hockey in Canada by examining media narratives of high-level amateur and professional hockey during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In particular, this project analyzes English Canadian newspaper coverage of Stanley Cup games between 1894 and 1907, as well as the telegraph reconstructions that enabled fans to share a simultaneous experience of distant games. Media coverage of hockey brought Canadians into local and national communities of interest, while constructing narratives of manhood, regional rivalry, and civic pride. Hockey played a significant role in the construction of gender and class identities, and in debates about amateurism, professionalism, and community representation in sport. By exploring key issues related to media, gender, and community identities in early hockey, this research addresses important gaps in the study of sport history and the analysis of sport and Canadian popular culture.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: Sexism is an ongoing problem within the Olympic Games, and in broader society. Historians are well placed to analyze social change over time and have a role to play in transforming gendered meanings that contribute to cultural sexism. However, to have real political effects, historians need to pay greater attention to the contradictory, discontinuous, and complex aspects of gender history, and contextualize women’s experiences within the whole field of gender relations. In this paper, a critical historical approach inspired by Michel Foucault and Joan W. Scott is proposed as a means to achieve this goal. The case of road cycling is used as an example to illustrate how Olympic historians might approach a topic from this critical perspective.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research on the home advantage in the history of the Olympic Games has found initial evidence that host nations have won more medals than non-hosts. In this paper, we argue that these findings are a myth of sports history, providing poor estimates of the home advantage in the Olympics. We argue that selection bias accounts for the findings in previous work, which uses an empirical strategy of comparing host nations to all non-hosts and to historical performances of host countries with much smaller delegations. When we correct for this bias the evidence in favour of a hosting advantage disappears. Additionally, we argue that the existing literature has largely neglected the rules about athlete qualification for host countries. To the extent that a small home advantage does exist, it is almost entirely driven by increased participation rates.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: This study analyzes media coverage of the two Stanley Cup hockey challenges played by the Winnipeg Victorias and the Montreal Victorias in February and December 1896. First presented in 1893, the Stanley Cup symbolized the national hockey championship of Canada. The essay argues that newspaper reports and telegraph reconstructions of early Stanley Cup hockey matches brought Canadians into both local and national communities of interest centred on sport, while helping to create a mediated Canadian ‘hockey world’ in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The 1896 Stanley Cup contests were likely the first two games in which the technology of telegraphy was applied to the sport of hockey in such a way that large crowds in distant cities could experience matches as they were being played. In addition, this study examines the regional and interurban rivalries that were expressed through Stanley Cup competition. Newspapers depicted Montreal and Winnipeg hockey teams as representatives of east-west conflict and difference, as well as embodiments of community identity and civic pride.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have discussed how the 1970s saw Women’s Artistic Gymnastics (WAG) evolve from its old, balletic traditions into a new, more acrobatic sport. Based on archival sources examined for the first time, this paper takes a broader view of governance in WAG to explore why it developed as it did. Within the Federation Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG), it identifies improvements to the apparatus and the new difficulty requirements as factors in acrobatization. By contrast, it reveals that the FIG was disappointed with the resulting abundance of younger gymnasts and – foreshadowing current concerns – disturbed by a loss of artistry. But these were not the FIG’s most pressing problems, nor was acrobatization the only way the sport developed in this decade. Lack of transparent judging also affected WAG, suggesting score fixing and negotiation. Meanwhile, pressure from the International Olympic Committee also influenced the sport, persuading the FIG to make changes to the number of teams and individuals competing at the Olympics and introduce the ‘two per country’ rule. These insights show that FIG policies, and indeed changes within WAG itself, were the result of more complex influences than previously imagined.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: Academics working in cultural studies argue that disciplinary boundaries inhibit knowledge production and argue that sports historians should bring the concepts of other disciplines to historical storytelling. They also emphasize the plurality of cultural meaning attached to sport and insist that politics and power relations suffuse everything.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: This paper is an analysis of the 1959 Chicago Pan-American Games. It is framed by the interpretive problem of why these Games have been erased from Chicago’s civic memory.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: While most equate Mexican Olympism with the 1968 Olympic Games, few know the drama of the event that laid its groundwork. From the creation of the Ministry of Public Education in 1921, cultural and military leaders heavily invested in sports infrastructure to help regenerate its rural masses, but by the 1940s, post-war modernizers sought the hosting of large international athletic events to boost its prestige, foment national pride, and prove to the world it was ready to springboard into modernity. This paper recounts the triumphs, betrayals, corruption, and politics of Pan-American sport and the Olympic movement in Mexico in the 1940s and 1950s that culminated in the improbable success of the 1955 Mexico City Pan-American Games.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: By focusing on football grounds as a form of material culture, this paper shows how archaeology can illuminate textual and other historical documents. It looks at the developing area of community archaeological projects and how these help reinforce the role of place, memory, and meaning in the historic sports landscape.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: Embedded in the sport of triathlon is an uneasy relationship between the independence and individualism fostered by the nature of the sport and the sporting collectivism needed to safely stage triathlons, establish accepted measures of high performance and secure government, media and Olympic recognition. This tension is highlighted in remote locations where local identities and recreational communities tend to present stronger forces in the shaping of triathlon practice than the sport’s governing institutions and its rules and regulations. Katherine, a landlocked town in Australia’s Northern Territory situated approximately 300 km from Darwin, offers a colourful and useful example of the divergent priorities of sporting and local recreational communities. This paper draws on interviews, newsletters, cuttings and triathlon ephemera as well as scholarship regarding sports clubs and social capital, the process of sportification, and the potential role of the natural and built environment in shaping local sporting practice. It examines the rise and fall of organized triathlon in Katherine and proposes that the rule of triathlon law gained only a temporary and tenuous hold most likely due to the strength of geo-spatially defined recreational identities and practices.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the confluence of global, regional, and national politics in the lead up to the 1991 Pan-American Games hosted by Cuba. Cuba’s contentious selection as host was wholly underpinned by the international politics of the time. Once selected, the preparations for the Games in Havana were surrounded by an unprecedented domestic economic crisis fueled by shifts in global politics. This paper analyzes how international politics informed the hosting of the 1991 Pan-American Games, and shaped the political challenge the Cuban government faced in hosting such an event. The Revolution’s use of sport domestically and internationally came to the forefront in its efforts as host and the results of those efforts proved to be providential given the emerging political economic contexts during and in the ensuing years after the Games.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: The VI Pan-American Games in Cali, Colombia were planned as a harbinger of a modern Colombia. The games featured many impressive athletic performances but failed to create the lasting impact organizers had imagined. Timing was bad. Colombia had seen a decade of economic growth after a generation of civil war. However, much of that progress was compromised beginning in the mid-1970s with the escalation of new internal wars fuelled in part by the quick growth of the cocaine sector, controlled in part by a Cali-based cartel. At the same time, games organizers did not grasp that Cali’s modernization problems were in large measure the product of growing urban social inequalities as a function of severe race and class divisions. The inability to recognize that linkage was explored in a low-budget documentary, Oiga, Vea (Listen, Look), released during the games. The film anticipated the impossible distance between grinding urban poverty and games-related projects to modernize the city. In keeping with the film’s criticism of games planners’ narratives on modernization, the manner in which the games were iconified for Colombians reflected that same distance. This is evident in projections of race and identity in games imagery and architecture.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport
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    ABSTRACT: The rise in interest in women’s ice hockey has been very recent compared to the men’s version of the game. While men have competed in the Olympics since 1920, women’s ice hockey was only introduced in 1998. A watershed moment for the growth of the women’s game was the inaugural Women’s World Hockey Championship (WWHC), held in Ottawa, Canada, in March of 1990. The event would be instrumental in showcasing the abilities of elite female players, garnering support for the inclusion of women’s ice hockey in the Olympic Games, and legitimating women’s hockey as an elite sport. However, while the popularity of the sport today remains a legacy of the 1990 WWHC, the event itself started from more modest beginnings. With the Championship, initially facing a lack of public and media interest, the tournament committee made several key changes, including a strategic marketing decision to have Team Canada wear pink jerseys, to elevate the profile of the tournament. Ultimately, media support and approval of the International Ice Hockey Federation and International Olympic Committee would allow the women’s hockey to become a mainstay on the world stage.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of the History of Sport