Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (J EUR ACAD DERMATOL)

Publisher: European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, Wiley

Journal description

The Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology publishes articles of general and practical interest in the field of Dermatology and Venereology on clinical and basic science topics, as well as research with practical implications. The Journal also publishes: editorials, review and practice articles, original papers of general interest, short reports, case reports, letters to the editor, news items, features and Academy announcements.

Current impact factor: 2.83

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.826
2013 Impact Factor 3.105
2012 Impact Factor 2.694
2011 Impact Factor 2.98
2010 Impact Factor 3.309
2009 Impact Factor 2.787
2008 Impact Factor 2.276
2007 Impact Factor 1.437
2006 Impact Factor 1.532
2005 Impact Factor 1.638
2004 Impact Factor 1.401
2003 Impact Factor 1.368
2002 Impact Factor 1.021
2001 Impact Factor 0.981
2000 Impact Factor 0.675
1999 Impact Factor 0.466

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.98
Cited half-life 5.00
Immediacy index 0.58
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 0.83
Website Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology website
Other titles Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (Online), JEADV
ISSN 0926-9959
OCLC 45265858
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • Non-Commercial
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 07/08/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a highly prevalent disease with a major impact on quality of life; therefore, appropriate patient management is mandatory. Given that many issues in psoriasis are controversial and not clearly defined by evidence-based medicine, management of psoriasis is very variable. Expert consensus can generate practical guidelines for optimization of patient care. Much has changed since 2009, when the Consensus Document on the Evaluation and Treatment of Moderate to Severe Psoriasis was published by the Spanish Psoriasis Group (GEP) of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV). The objective of the present consensus document is to provide the dermatologist with updated recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. All active members of the GEP of the AEDV were invited to participate in the survey. The final group comprised 46 members from various areas of Spain and with substantial experience in managing psoriasis. A 3-round Delphi process was used to reach consensus. Consistent agreement and consistent disagreement (consensus) required the achievement of at least two of the following three criteria: Criterion 1, which was based on the position occupied by the mean on a scale of 1-9 and an SD <2; Criterion 2, which was based on the median and interquartile range (IQR) on a scale of 1-9; Criterion 3, which considered the percentage of the voting experts on a scale of 1-9. The items studied were definition of severity, therapeutic objectives, indications for systemic treatment and biologic therapy, induction and maintenance periods, therapeutic failure, loss of response, relapse and rebound, continuous and intermittent therapy, screening of patients before treatment, adherence to therapy, follow-up of treatment outcome, combination of drugs, transitioning and associated comorbidities. Consistent agreement or disagreement (consensus) was achieved for 198 items (agreement, 3 criteria 146 items, 2 criteria 43 items; disagreement, 3 criteria 9 items, 2 criteria 0 items) based on the criteria described above. Completion of the Delphi consensus process enabled a broad and experienced group of Spanish psoriasis experts to provide useful and practical guidelines for the management and treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis, particularly in areas where evidence is lacking.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Previous studies suggest that alopecia areata (AA) may significantly affect patient quality of life (QoL). There are no studies that assess QoL in Serbian AA patients. Objectives: This study aims to assess the impact of AA on patients' QoL in comparison to patients affected by other skin diseases and to determine the impact of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of AA patients on QoL. Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study of 60 patients with AA was conducted at the Clinic of Dermatovenereology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade between April 2012 and June 2013. The severity of hair loss was assessed using the Severity of Alopecia Tool (SALT). Patients' self-assessment of QoL was measured by three self-administered questionnaires: The Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and The Skindex-29. Results: Sixty AA patients (16 males and 44 females) with mean age of 37.35 ± 14.26 years completed the questionnaires. We confirmed that QoL of our AA patients was impaired. Compared with patients suffering from psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and onychomycosis AA patients presented significantly better QoL. Severity of disease (SALT) correlated only with personal relationship - dimension of DLQI (ρ = 0.29, P < 0.05) and social functioning - dimension of Skindex (ρ = 0.26, P < 0.05). No correlation was observed between severity of the disease and SF-36 subscales. AA patients with depression had significantly worse QoL in daily activities, leisure, work or school and personal relationships - DLQI dimensions, and emotions and social functioning - Skindex subscales. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that AA influences QoL, but to a lesser degree than observed for psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and onychomycosis.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The social stigma and chronicity of psoriasis significantly affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Objective: We examined the effect of three regimens of secukinumab on HRQoL in moderate to severe psoriasis patients. Methods: Twelve-week data from a phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, regimen-finding study evaluated HRQoL, measured by the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Secukinumab or placebo was administered subcutaneously in three treatment regimens: single (baseline only), monthly (baseline, weeks 4, 8) and early (baseline, weeks 1, 2, 4). Differences among regimens were assessed with logistic regression models and Fisher's exact test. Results: Patients (n = 404) were randomized to single (baseline) treatment regimen, n = 66; monthly, (baseline, weeks 4 and 8), n = 138; early, (baseline, weeks 1, 2, 4), n = 133; and placebo, n = 67. DLQI response was significantly higher in early, monthly and single regimens than in placebo regimen (40.8%, 33.6% and 13.1% vs. 1.6%, respectively; P < 0.001 for all). Conclusion: Moderate to severe psoriasis patients receiving monthly and early treatment with secukinumab demonstrated improved HRQoL compared with placebo.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Neurosyphilis is one of the most feared complications of syphilis. The question of how to identify patients at higher risk in order for timely intervention whilst avoiding unnecessary lumbar puncture remains. Methods: Between August 2009 and March 2013, a total of 834 HIV-negative patients with primary, secondary or latent syphilis were recruited. Venous blood and cerebrospinal fluid specimens were collected for diagnoses of syphilis and/or neurosyphilis and information of socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics was collected by interviewing with a questionnaire. Results: The prevalence of neurosyphilis differed among patients with primary (7.1%), secondary (23.8%) and latent (26.6%) syphilis. Neurosyphilis was more likely in male patients (1.52-fold). Compared with patients aged <30 years, those aged 45-59 years and ≥60 years old had a 2.51-fold and 4.98-fold risk of neurosyphilis respectively. Male gender and age ≥45 years were consistently associated with neurosyphilis both in secondary and latent stage. There was a 2.68-fold, 2.55-fold and 3.67-fold increased risk of neurosyphilis when the serum RPR titer was 1:32, 1:64 and ≥1:128 compared to that of ≤1:16. ). Conclusions: Male gender and age 45years are both correlated risk factors for neurosyphilis in HIV-negative patients with primary, secondary and latent syphilis.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The course of dermatomyositis (DM) can be chronic with relapses, which are associated with major morbidity. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify presentation features that predict DM relapses. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data of patients with DM recorded from 1990 to 2011, including muscle biopsy results. Characteristics of patients with and without relapses were compared. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using a Cox model. Results: We identified 34 patients, with a mean age of 46 ± 17 years (range, 18-77) and 24 (71%) women. The muscle and skin abnormalities relapsed in 21 (61%) patients. By univariate analysis, two presentation features were significantly associated with a subsequently relapsing course, namely, dysphonia [HR = 3.2 (1.2-8.5)] and greater skin lesion severity defined as a Cutaneous Disease Area Severity Index [CDASI] > 20 [HR = 3.5 (1.2-7.9)]. Conclusion: Dysphonia and skin lesion severity at disease onset must be recorded, as they significantly predict a relapsing disease course.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Several studies have suggested an association between Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS) and obesity. Obesity is often expressed as Body Mass Index (BMI). However, BMI lacks information on body composition. General obesity is a predictor of health status and cardiovascular risk, but body composition (e.g. abdominal fat) may be more so. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is an expression of resting metabolism and may serve as a complementary tool when assessing the possibly underlying metabolism behind a persons' body composition. Objective: To investigate the body composition and basal metabolic rate in individuals with HS compared with healthy controls. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study on both a hospital-based and population-based HS group and compared with controls using Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis to assess body composition. Results: We identified a hospital-based HS group of 32 hospital HS patients, a population-based HS group of 430 population HS patients, and 20 780 controls. Age- and sex-adjusted analyses showed a 10.12% (P < 0.0001) significantly higher fat percentage in the hospital-based HS group and 3.11% (P < 0.0001) significantly higher fat percentage for the population-based HS group compared to controls. Correspondingly, the HS groups had a lower muscle percentage (P < 0.0001) and lower bone mass percentage (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, visceral fat rating (P < 0.0001), Body Mass Index (P < 0.0001), waist circumference (P < 0.0001), and Waist/Hip Ratio (P < 0.0001) was significantly higher in HS patients compared with controls. Additionally, age and sex-adjusted analyses showed a higher predicted estimate of BMR for the HS groups compared with controls (154.56 kcal/day (95% CI 54.96-254.16) (P = 0.0031) for the hospital-based HS group, and 82.63 kcal/day (95%CI 59.70-105.56) (P < 0.0001) for the population-based HS group). Conclusion: Hidradenitis Suppurativa is associated with a high fat percentage, high visceral fat, and low muscle percentage adding to the morbidity of HS. The higher predicted estimate of basal metabolic rate (BMR) in HS patients may reflect a dysfunctional metabolism contributing to the high-fat-body composition.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Hand eczema (HE) is the most common skin disease acquired at work. It presents in different clinical patterns. Objective: To classify different types of HE according to their clinical pattern and associated factors in patients taking part in a tertiary individual prevention programme (TIP) for occupational skin diseases. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the medical records of 843 patients taking part in the TIP were evaluated. HE was classified into three clinical subtypes: vesicular HE, hyperkeratotic HE and HE with erythema and desquamation. Results: About 723 patients (85.8%) suffered from HE. Female TIP patients with HE were significantly younger (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.99) and had a higher prevalence of flexural eczema (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.15-2.23) and an atopic HE component (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.36-2.48) than men. Vesicular HE was more common in women (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.07-1.94) and significantly associated with hyperhidrosis (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.23-2.33), flexural eczema (OR 1.37, 95% CI 0.99-1.89) and an atopic HE component (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.44-2.61). Hyperkeratotic HE was more frequent in men (OR 3.70, 95% CI 2.27-6.25) and associated with older age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.06). The cohort of patients with HE characterized by erythema and desquamation was very heterogeneous. Vesicular HE was significantly associated with tobacco smoking (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.40-2.68), while hyperkeratotic HE was significantly less common in smokers (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.22-0.65). Conclusion: Environmental and individual factors are associated with different clinical patterns of HE in patients taking part in the TIP. They may influence the prognosis and should be considered in the individual management of disease. Tobacco smoking may be in particular a risk factor for vesicular HE.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology