Military Psychology (MIL PSYCHOL)

Publisher: American Psychological Association

Journal description

Focusing on psychological research or practice in military environments, Military Psychology facilitates communication between researchers and practitioners by publishing original research that furthers scientific knowledge in the field. Filling the gap between the Department of Defense and civilian researchers, it publishes behavioral science research having military applications in clinical and health psychology, training and human factors, manpower and personnel, social and organizational systems, and testing and measurement.

Current impact factor: 0.72

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.391

Additional details

5-year impact 1.24
Cited half-life 6.40
Immediacy index 0.55
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.44
Website Military Psychology website
Other titles Military psychology (Online), Military psychology
ISSN 0899-5605
OCLC 45007137
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

American Psychological Association

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors' pre-print on a web-site
    • Authors' pre-print must be labeled with date and accompanied with statement that paper has not (yet) been published
    • Copy of authors final peer-reviewed manuscript as accepted for publication
    • Authors' post-print on author's web-site, employers server or institutional repository, after acceptance
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to APA journal home page or article DOI
    • Article must include the following statement: 'This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.'
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • APA will submit NIH author articles to PubMed Central, after author completion of form
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has a primary etiology in experiencing psychological trauma and the subsequent psychological sequelae (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). There are multiple trauma types that may serve as the index trauma in PTSD. This exploratory study compared DSM–5 PTSD symptoms for 3 types of trauma in veterans: combat trauma (n = 36), sexual trauma (n = 21), and civilian trauma (n = 21). Results indicated that veterans with combat trauma were likely to experience diminished interest and detachment and estrangement from others. Veterans with sexual trauma were likely to experience detachment and estrangement from others, sleep disturbances, and problems with concentration. Veterans with civilian traumas were less likely to meet criteria for PTSD and were less likely to experience a number of PTSD symptoms. Results of this preliminary study suggest that PTSD is not a unitary disorder, but a disorder characterized by different subtypes based on the precipitating trauma.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Distress tolerance (DT), the perceived or actual ability to tolerate negative emotional or physical states, is inversely related to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in civilian, community samples. No studies to date have examined the relationship between DT and PTSD in clinical samples of veterans with a comorbid diagnosis of PTSD and a substance use disorder (SUD). Thus, the present study examined the relationship between DT and PTSD in a sample of predominately African American, male veterans (n = 75) diagnosed with comorbid PTSD and SUD (according to a structured clinical interview). Results of hierarchical linear regression models indicated that DT was inversely related to total PTSD symptom severity score, above and beyond depressive symptoms and SUD severity. Of the 4 symptom clusters, DT was inversely associated with intrusions and hyperarousal. These findings are discussed in light of previous work with civilian samples. Determining whether treatment incorporating DT skills would be useful for veterans undergoing PTSD treatment should be evaluated.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Deployment can be a significant source of stress for military families. Understanding how families prepare in the face of such stress, and which families are more versus less likely to prepare, is a priority of the Department of Defense. However, there has been scant research on how families prepare for deployments and the factors associated with engagement in preparation activities. The current study is a cross-sectional examination of the proportion of households engaging in deployment preparation activities and family-level and individual-level factors that are associated with these activities in a large and representative sample of married, deployable service members and their families from all military services and components (n = 1,621). Overall, results showed that families reported high rates of engaging in preparation activities, with particularly strong engagement in financial and legal preparation tasks. Talking about deployment to prepare a spouse or child was also relatively highly endorsed but not as frequently cited compared to other logistical preparation activities. Older spouses, officers, active component families, and those with higher marital satisfaction reported greater participation in preparation activities. Families with greater socioemotional difficulties, as indexed by child emotional problems or greater depressive symptoms in the service member or spouse, as well as those with lower spouse-reported marital satisfaction, were more likely to seek professional help. Evaluating the effectiveness of programs in reaching the families that may be least likely to prepare, as well as examining the longitudinal association between deployment preparation and postdeployment family adjustment, is an important area for further inquiry. (PsycINFO Database Record
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Initial military training-instructor duty places noncommissioned officers (NCOs) in a critical position of trust to safely, effectively train and transition recruits into military service. In this context, ineffective or inappropriate behavior by instructors has been shown to impact trainee mental health, unit cohesion, and integration (Foran & Adler, 2013). Abuse of power, specifically exploitative and criminally and sexually abusive behavior by even a small number of instructors, as occurred in United States Air Force (USAF) basic military training (BMT) between 2010 and 2012, may result in a broad loss of public trust. Assessment of suitability for these duties is not consistently pursued across military services, with scant empirical work to best target what is necessary for safe, effective service as a BMT instructor. This article describes 3 job-analytic studies conducted to identify criteria for screening NCOs for USAF military training-instructor duty, as well as planned methods for evaluation.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the importance of 2 resilience resources for service members' ability to deal with threat during deployment. Military self-efficacy and family support were measured before deployment and related to work engagement and burnout levels of service members during deployment. We hypothesized that in high threat situations, low self-efficacy would lead to unfavorable outcomes, whereas in low threat situations, high self-efficacy could have negative consequences. In addition, we hypothesized that family support would compensate for both effects. The results showed these expected 3-way interactions. We found that strong self-efficacy helped service members deal with exposure to threatening situations during deployment, leading to more work engagement and less burnout. However, having strong self-efficacy without being exposed to threat during deployment reduced service members' work engagement and increased burnout. In addition, we found that the presence of family support compensated for these effects. Service members with low self-efficacy benefitted from family support when threat exposure was high, whereas service members with high self-efficacy benefitted from family support when threat exposure was low. As such, family support seemed to act as a compensatory mechanism for the potential negative effects of self-efficacy. This underlines the importance of studying the interplay between resources that help service members deal with deployment experiences. Practical implications relate to supporting service members' resilience through enhancing multiple resources. (PsycINFO Database Record
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: The United States Air Force Deployment Transition Center (DTC) operates a 2-day third-location decompression program that commenced operations during the summer of 2010 in Ramstein, Germany, with the aim to assist Air Force service members (AFSMs) who are returning from deployment as they prepare to reintegrate back into their home lives and work stations. The present study evaluated the impact of DTC attendance on later mental health outcomes. Because participants are not randomly assigned to attend the DTC, propensity score weighting was used to compare DTC participants (N = 1,573) to a weighted control group of AFSMs (N = 1,570) in the same job specialties who returned from deployment during the same time period. Rates of endorsement to items on the Postdeployment Health Reassessment were examined and compared, as were rates of mental health diagnoses from AFSMs' official medical records. Key findings indicate that DTC participants reported lower levels of depressive and posttraumatic stress symptoms and lower levels of relationship conflict following return from deployment, as compared to weighted control participants. Mental health diagnostic rates were comparable for the 2 groups during the first 6 months following return from deployment. These findings suggest that participation in the DTC program had notable benefits for redeploying AFSMs and support the continued use of the program. (PsycINFO Database Record
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has shown that the same aptitude and trait measures that predict success in U.S. Air Force (USAF) manned aircraft pilot training predict remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) pilot training outcomes with generally similar levels of validity (Carretta, 2013; Rose, Barron, Carretta, Arnold, & Howse, 2014). However, because USAF RPA pilots initially train in manned aircraft, validation of aptitude and traits predictive of RPA pilot success has thus far been limited to RPA pilot training outcomes that actually require manned flight. Hence, thus far, there has been no basis for determining the aptitudes and traits predictive of success in environments in which pilots actually fly RPAs. To address this gap, the present study evaluated preaccession trait (Big Five personality domains) and aptitude (spatial, quantitative, and aviation knowledge) measures as predictors of manned and unmanned aircraft pilot performance on-the-job, as measured by supervisor and senior rater stratification on 3 years of Officer Performance Reports (OPRs). Results were generally consistent in showing that the same aptitudes, knowledge, and personality traits that predict successful job performance for manned aircraft pilots also predict successful job performance for RPA pilots. However, results also showed preaccession aviation knowledge to be a stronger predictor of job performance for RPA pilots than for manned aircraft pilots. These findings and their implications for attracting and selecting RPA pilots are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the psychometric properties of the Outcome Questionnaire-30.2 (OQ-30.2; designed to measure patient progress throughout mental health treatment) in a sample of United States Air Force active duty basic military trainees who were evaluated for mental health concerns during the course of basic training. Findings indicate that the OQ-30.2 was internally consistent and Total scores decreased with more contact with mental health professionals. Previously reported 1- and 3-factor structures were not replicated; rather, results suggested the use of a broad 27-item general psychological distress subscale and a separate subscale of 3 critical items assessing substance use concerns. Present findings support the utility of the OQ-30.2 as a tool for repeated monitoring of patient progress in military mental health settings. Recommendations for future directions in the development of alternate calculations of the clinical cut score and reliable change index are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: False memory susceptibility was measured in 80 Iraq/Afghanistan veterans with (n = 32) and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; n = 48) using a modified Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) word list task that included trauma-related critical (nonpresented) lures. PTSD was classified using medical record diagnoses. Participants completed a variety of self-report assessments, including the Beck Depression Inventory, the Anxiety and Stress subscales of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, the Dissociative Experiences Scale, and the Tellegen Absorption Scale. Veterans with PTSD displayed global memory impairments on all types of items, except for traumarelated critical lures; on these critical lures, they exhibited false memory levels equal to those seen in veterans without PTSD. The magnitude of most effects were reduced, but not entirely eliminated, when controlling for depression, suggesting that neither PTSD nor co-occurring depression entirely explain these findings. The potential effects of other mental health conditions, such as alcohol dependence, could not be ruled out. Our results support explanations of PTSD that emphasize differential processing of trauma-related information.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Suicide among U.S. Army soldiers remains a significant concern for both population health and personnel readiness, with firearms constituting the majority of soldier suicides. Means restriction, or removing an at-risk soldier's access to lethal means, is a well-established procedure for reducing suicides. Nonetheless, various cultural, legal, and practical concerns may encumber firearms restriction implementation in the U.S. Army. This article reviews policy relevant to firearms restriction, including federal laws, Department of Defense directives, and U.S. Army regulations. Recommendations are provided for providers and commanders that balance the rights of soldiers with the need to ensure safety. In particular, installation restriction, field settings, enlisting supportive others, unit engagement, and off-installation storage are discussed. These approaches span the public health intervention model, providing numerous potential avenues to a balanced approach for firearms restriction in preventing suicide.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to investigate which coping strategies can predict success or failure in the Brazilian Army's Jungle Operations Course. To achieve this, the sample included 36 military volunteers (18 who quit and 18 who completed the course) from a total of 63 candidates (57.14%), all male career officers and sergeants of the Brazilian Army. Results indicate that completers (n = 18) show significantly higher scores in 2 of the 8 different coping strategy factors-self-control and positive reappraisal-than those in the quitters group (n = 18). In general, emotion-focused strategies were prominent in relation to problem-focused ones. The findings of this study suggest that coping strategies focused on emotion, especially self-control and positive reappraisal, can influence individuals' performance in situations of intensive military training, which possibly makes them more resilient, preparing them for a more successful training.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Pain complaints are highly prevalent among military personnel of the combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, due, in part, to blast-related injuries. Further, pain often co-occurs with conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, thereby complicating assessment. An accurate understanding of pain characteristics in the context of polytrauma injuries has the potential to improve diagnostic and treatment options. The present study examined the factor structure of the Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire in a sample of 209 U.S. military service members and veterans who reported blast experience during combat deployment. Factor analysis yielded a 4-factor solution that included a unique pain profile associated with the descriptors "aching," "tender," and "splitting." Individuals reporting head, lower back, and knee pain scored highly on this factor, suggesting that these pain descriptors may be particularly relevant to the types of injuries most frequently sustained by the military personnel in our sample.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Daytime and nighttime symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common among combat veterans and military service members. However, there is a great deal of heterogeneity in how symptoms are expressed. Clarifying the heterogeneity of daytime and nighttime PTSD symptoms through exploratory clustering may generate hypotheses regarding ways to optimally match evidence-based treatments to PTSD symptom profiles. We used mixture modeling to reveal clusters based on six daytime and nighttime symptoms of 154 combat veterans with insomnia and varying levels of PTSD symptoms. Three clusters with increasing symptom severity were identified (N1=50, N2=70, N3=34). These results suggest that, among veterans with insomnia, PTSD symptoms tend to exist on a continuum of severity, rather than as a categorical PTSD diagnosis. Hypotheses regarding possible targeted treatment strategies for veterans within each identified cluster, as well as ways to generalize these methods to other groups within the military, are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Cross-cultural competence (3C) is critical for military personnel to understand and perform effectively in complex cultural environments and to interact with individuals from other cultures. The knowledge, skills, and abilities that make up 3C can result in clearer communication, build trust, and strengthen relationships in cross-cultural social contexts (Selmeski, 2009). This research investigated the role of emotional regulation and optimism in the development of 3C in military personnel. Results demonstrate that the ability to regulate emotions is positively related to 3C, both directly and through its effect on optimism.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined psychological and physical health factors in a cohort of U.S. Marine recruits with the goal of developing a comprehensive understanding of attributes recruits bring to training. 1,350 male recruits completed a multimeasure survey during the first week of training. A 2-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted to explore the relationship of hardiness dimensions on several psychological and physical factors. Compared with other military samples, this cohort reported similar levels on hardiness control and rigidity subscales. Recruits who reported higher scores on a measure of positive hardiness also reported higher scores on measures of grit, grit ambition, sensation seeking, training expectations, positive ways of coping, physical and mental health, fitness scores, and lower scores on a measure of depression. This study provides a more complete understanding of the complex array of attributes of Marine recruits and forms a foundation for predictive models of injury risk and/or attrition.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: PE Coach is a mobile application (app) designed as a treatment companion to support patient and provider work during prolonged exposure (PE), a first-line treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder. Little research exists about patients' and providers' reactions to mobile apps in the context of psychotherapy. The present study examined PE Coach with 2 soldiers to assess usability and satisfaction with the app. Soldiers completed 8 sessions of PE and used PE Coach during 4 of those sessions. Soldiers rated the PE Coach positively and reported higher levels of satisfaction during PE with PE Coach as compared with PE alone. Authors discuss their clinical observations from using PE Coach. The soldier and provider experiences demonstrate the potential value of PE Coach in enhancing treatment engagement and support the value of future research exploring mobile computing platforms to support evidence-based treatments, in general.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Military Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Neck and Manz (1999) elaborated in their article "In Search of the Self-Lead Soldier" on the need for continuous improvement of personnel qualities such as increase in self-efficacy, increase of performance, and decrease of perceived strain. Self-leadership is a tool that fosters exactly these personal resources. This study examines selfleadership training effects on soldiers participating in a military training course over 14 weeks. It is the first self-leadership training study to evaluate performance improvement using objective criteria (examination marks, physical tests) in intervention and control group consisting of soldiers of the Austrian army. Its design features a large sample (N = 130), duration of self-leadership training over 10 weeks, and evaluation over 4 time points. The intervention group accomplished significantly higher educational achievements in examinations and physical tests. Also levels of self-efficacy were significantly higher and levels of strain were marginally to significantly lower.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Military Psychology