American journal of dentistry (AM J DENT)

Journal description

The American Journal of Dentistry, published by Mosher & Linder, Inc., provides peer-reviewed scientific articles with clinical significance for the general dental practitioner.

Current impact factor: 0.85

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 0.85
2013 Impact Factor 1.062
2012 Impact Factor 1.057
2011 Impact Factor 0.757
2010 Impact Factor 1.145
2009 Impact Factor 1.314
2008 Impact Factor 1.13
2007 Impact Factor 1.276
2006 Impact Factor 1.027
2005 Impact Factor 1.186
2004 Impact Factor 1.032
2003 Impact Factor 1.029
2002 Impact Factor 0.961
2001 Impact Factor 0.885
2000 Impact Factor 1.452
1999 Impact Factor 1.403
1998 Impact Factor 1.135
1997 Impact Factor 1.116

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.26
Cited half-life 9.90
Immediacy index 0.03
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.33
Website American Journal of Dentistry website
Other titles American journal of dentistry, AJD
ISSN 0894-8275
OCLC 16264374
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate the effect of different repair procedures and storage time on microtensile bond strength (mu TBS) of a resin composite to an older one from a simulated previous restoration. Methods: Composite disks were made by layering 2 mm-thick increments of a nanohybrid composite (Grandio) shade Al in a Teflon mold (4x8 mm). Afterwards, they were light-cured and stored (37 degrees C/7 days) in a saline solution. Specimens were randomly divided into groups according to the surface treatment applied: (1) Composite surface was roughened with a bur (Cimara) and Solobond Plus adhesive was applied; (2) Sandblasting with 27 mu m aluminum oxide particles (KaVo Rondoflex), and adhesive application; (3) Air-abrasion with 30 mu m alumina particles coated with silica (Co Jet Sand), silane (MonobondS) and adhesive application; (4) Negative control group with only adhesive application. Afterwards, Grandio composite (shade A3.5) was packed incrementally on the treated surface obtaining another disk (4x8 mm). Repaired blocks were stored (24 hours or 6 months) and afterwards mu TBS test was performed and failure mode was evaluated. Also, beams obtained from 8 mm-high composite blocks without any surface treatment were immediately submitted to mu TBS test to determine Grandio composite cohesive bond strength (positive control group). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). Results: The repair procedure affected mu TBS values (P < 0.001) while neither storage time nor interactions did (P > 0.05). All repair procedures achieved bond strength values higher than the negative control group but they did not reach the composite's cohesive bond strength. The overall conclusion was that an increased superficial roughness by means of a bur, silica coating or alumina sandblasting improved mu TBS of the repaired composite and bond strength remained stable after 6 months.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To compare the clinical, microbiological and metabonomic profiles of subjects with high and low levels of chronic gingival bleeding during a controlled oral hygiene regimen intervention including sequential phases of rigorous therapeutic oral hygiene followed by experimental gingivitis (EG). Methods: Two cohorts of qualified study subjects with differences in gingival bleeding on probing levels at their baseline clinical examination were entered into the study. These two cohorts were followed through three separate study phases including a 1-week baseline phase, a 2-week phase of rigorous oral hygiene including dental prophylaxis, and a 3-week EG phase of no oral hygiene to encourage relapse of gingivitis. The 58 subjects were assessed during each phase of the study for clinical presentation of gingivitis and concurrently had plaque sampled for real-time polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) microbiological characterization and salivary lavage samples for 'systems biology' metabonomics assessment by H-1-NMR. Results: Subjects presenting with different levels of gingival bleeding on probing when they entered the study responded differently to rigorous oral hygiene and EG. Specifically, the high bleeding cohort responded sluggishly to rigorous oral hygiene and exhibited markedly greater relapse to gingivitis during EG. RTPCR analysis showed changes in bacterial populations that were associated with study phases, particularly the increases in putative periodontal pathogens during EG. However, the microbiological profiles of high- and low-susceptibility gingival bleeding patients were largely similar. Metabonomic analysis likewise revealed significant changes in metabolite composition during study phases associated with differences in plaque toxicity, especially the short chain carboxylic acids propionate and n-butyrate, which tracked clinical changes in gingivitis severity. Systems analysis of metabonomic changes suggested differences between cohorts, although analysis to date has not elucidated whether these differences are causative (population predictive) or simply diagnostic of clinical status within populations.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · American journal of dentistry

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To assess the antimicrobial effects of a fluoride-free and alcohol-free mouthrinse containing 0.075% CPC (test rinse, TR) compared with an otherwise-identical CPC-free control rinse (CR). Methods: Activity against laboratory cultures of Fusobacterium nucleatum, a bacterium associated with gingival disease, was determined using viable counting following 30-second exposures to TR and CR. Effects against intact saliva-derived plaque biofilms were quantified using confocal microscopy coupled with three-dimensional image analyses (viability profiling). Results: Short exposures to TR caused significant inactivation of F. nucleatum, as determined by viable counting (c. 3 log reduction compared to the control rinse, P< 0.05). Confocal microscopy revealed extensive inactivation of complex oral biofilms following treatment with TR; biofilms were significantly less viable than those exposed to CR and three-dimensional images revealed extensive zones of dead bacteria even within plaque depths. In conclusion, this investigation demonstrates that the CPC-containing mouthrinse has significant antibacterial efficacy against oral bacteria associated with gingival disease and significantly inactivated plaque biofilm in comparison to a relevant control.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To update the rationale for the use of mouthwashes and summarize data on the incorporation of an antibacterial, cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), into a new mouthwash formulation. Data from various published articles are reviewed which demonstrate the value of mouthwashes. Also this Special Issue provides research supporting the efficacy of 0.075% cetylpyridinium chloride in a new, alcohol-free mouthwash formulation (Colgate Total). Results: Benefits of mouthwashes include improving the reduction of plaque biofilm as an adjunct to oral hygiene, killing bacteria in areas difficult to reach by normal oral hygiene, killing bacteria on non-tooth oral surfaces, reaching bacteria subgingivally by placement in an irrigator, and supporting a positive effect on oral health by reducing bacteremia from oral micro-organisms. The benefits of including CPC in this new formulation are demonstrated by in vitro and clinical studies which demonstrate the efficacy of this formulation of CPC on biofilm as well as an effect on the reduction of plaque and gingivitis in three clinical studies.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a test regimen (TR) integrating the use of a commercially available triclosan, PVM/MA copolymer, and sodium fluoride containing toothpaste, an alcohol-free, fluoride-free cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) mouthwash, and a manual toothbrush with cheek and tongue cleaner compared to a negative control regimen (NCR) integrating a commercially available 0.76% sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste, a manual toothbrush and a fluoride-free and alcohol-free non-antibacterial mouthwash in the reduction and control of established plaque and gingivitis after 4 weeks of product use. Method: A 4-week, two-cell, double-blind, parallel-group, randomized clinical study was conducted in Cedar Knolls, New Jersey, USA. Recruited subjects were randomly assigned to two regimens: (1) a commercially available toothpaste containing triclosan, PVM/MA copolymer, and 0.243% sodium fluoride, a manual toothbrush with cheek and tongue cleaner, and commercially available mouthwash containing 0.075% CPC in a fluoride-free and alcohol-free base (TR), or (2) a commercially available 0.76% sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste, a manual toothbrush with rounded/polished bristles, and a fluoride-free and alcoholfree non-antibacterial mouthwash (NCR). Subjects were examined for dental plaque and gingivitis. Gingiyal, Gingival Severity, Gingival Interproximal, Plaque, Plaque Severity and Plaque Interproximal Index scores were calculated. For regimen comparison, independent t-test and ANCOVA analyses were performed. Results: 130 subjects were screened; 120 enrolled; and 115 subjects completed the randomized clinical trial (RCT). After 4 weeks of product use, subjects using TR exhibited statistically significant (P< 0.001) reductions of 22.3%, 27.8% and 20.4% in mean Gingival, Gingival Severity and Gingival Interproximal Index scores, respectively, as compared to subjects using NCR. After 4 weeks of product use, subjects using TR exhibited statistically significant (P< 0.001) reductions of 28.2%, 60.7% and 27.6%) in mean Plaque, Plaque Severity and Plaque Interproximal Index scores, respectively, as compared to subjects using NCR.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of two commercially available, fluoride-free, alcohol-free mouthwashes containing either 0.075% or 0.07% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) in controlling established dental plaque and gingivitis compared to a non-antibacterial control mouthwash. Methods: A 6-week double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted in Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico. Recruited subjects were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) a fluoride-free, alcohol-free mouthwash containing 0.075% CPC (TG); (2) a fluoride-free, alcohol-free mouthwash containing 0.07% CPC (PC); and (3) a fluoride-free, alcohol-free mouthwash without antibacterial agent (NC). Subjects were instructed to rinse with the assigned mouthwash, after tooth brushing, twice daily (morning and evening). After 4 and 6 weeks of product use, subjects were examined for gingivitis (Whole Mouth Gingival, Gingival Interproximal, Gingival Severity Indexes) and plaque (Whole Mouth Plaque, Plaque Interproximal, and Plaque Severity Indexes) parameters. ANCOVA and post hoc Tukey's pair-wise comparisons (a = 0.05) were performed for treatment group comparisons. Results: A total of 132 subjects were screened; 120 were enrolled; and 116 completed the study. After 6 weeks of product use, participants who rinsed with the CPC-containing mouthwashes exhibited statistically significant (P> 0.05) reductions in all the gingivitis and plaque parameters evaluated, whereas in those using the non-antibacterial mouthwash, significant reductions were only observed in whole mouth and interproximal plaque scores. No statistically significant (P< 0.05) differences were observed, with respect to the gingival and plaque parameters, between the two CPC-containing mouthwashes.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a mouthwash containing 0.075% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) in a fluoride-free, alcohol-free base and a mouthwash containing essential oils in a fluoride-free, 21.6% alcohol base as compared to a fluoride-free, alcohol-free non-antibacterial mouthwash in controlling established dental plaque and gingivitis after 6 weeks of twice daily use. Methods: A 6-week, parallel-group, randomized double blind clinical trial was conducted in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Recruited subjects were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) a mouthwash containing 0.075% CPC in a fluoride-free, alcohol-free base (CPC); (2) a commercially-available mouthwash containing essential oils in a fluoride-free, 21.6% alcohol base (EO); or (3) a fluoride-free, alcohol-free non-antibacterial mouthwash (NC). Subjects were instructed to rinse with the assigned mouthwash, after tooth brushing, twice daily (morning and evening). After 4 and 6 weeks of product use, subjects were examined for gingivitis (Whole Mouth Gingival, Gingival Interproximal, Gingival Severity Indexes) and plaque (Whole Mouth Plaque, Plaque Interproximal, and Plaque Severity Indexes) parameters. For treatment group comparisons, ANCOVA and post hoc Tukey's pair-wise comparisons (a = 0.05) were performed. Results: 132 subjects were screened; 120 were enrolled; and 116 completed the study. After 6 weeks of product use, subjects using the CPC and EO mouthwashes exhibited statistically significant (P< 0.001) reductions of all gingival and plaque measurements compared to subjects using the NC mouthwash. Subjects using the CPC mouthwash did not exhibit a statistically significant (P> 0.05) reduction with respect to gingival severity and all plaque measures (Whole, Interproximal, and Severity) when compared to EO mouthwash. Subjects using the CPC mouthwash exhibited statistically significant (P< 0.05) reductions in Gingival Index scores of 5.1% (P= 0.005), and Gingival Interproximal Index scores of 5.5% (P= 0.016) relative to subjects using the EO mouthwash. These reductions were not considered clinically significant.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate the temperature changes at multiple sites within bulk-fill resin composites and in the pulp chamber during photopolymerization in the tooth cavity. Methods: Class 1 cavities (n = 5) prepared in extracted third molars were filled with SureFil SDR Flow, a newly developed bulk-fill composite. After securing the specimens in a water bath at 36.5 degrees C, eight thermocouples were used to measure the temperature at the bottom center (BC), middle center (MC), top center (TC), bottom edge (BE), middle edge (ME), and top edge (TE) of the restoration; the pulpal aspect of the dentin (PD); and the center of the curing light tip (CL) during photopolymerization. Results: The maximum temperature values (degrees C) differed among the measurement sites. TC exhibited the greatest temperature increase (72.3 ± 2.4), followed by MC, BC, TE, TE, ME, CL, and BE. The lowest temperature was observed at PD (41.1 ± 1.9). The peak temperatures within the composite were observed during the early stage of light-curing, while CL and PD exhibited the highest temperature at the end stage of light-curing.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To assess the physical effects of explorer probing on non-cavitated smooth-surface enamel carious lesions. Methods: Extracted teeth with white enamel decalcification (ICDAS 2) were used. Indentations were made in decalcified and non-decalcified regions with a #23 explorer using "scratch" or "poke" application and 100g, 300g or 600g force. Specimens were imaged with SEM and polarizing light microscopy. Indentation widths were measured digitally. Two-way ANOVA with pair-wise comparisons was used to assess interactions of force and enamel condition (normal or carious) on indentation groove width. Results: No or minimal effect was seen on normal enamel surface morphology. For the decalcified regions, defects were seen in SEM and polarizing light images. Findings included a smear layer, open clefts, lateral debris and micro-fractures. Two-way ANOVA for effects of force and enamel quality on mean groove width showed statistically significant differences for both variables for all teeth tested.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: This randomized, single center, examiner-blind, controlled, parallel-group, 4-week clinical study compared the antiplaque/anti-gingivitis efficacy of an essential oil (EO) containing mouthrinse versus a 0.075% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) containing mouthrinse. A 5% hydroalcohol solution was included as a control group. Methods: 165 systemically healthy volunteers (18-72 years of age), with mild to moderate plaque-related gingivitis were enrolled in this clinical trial; 162 subjects completed the study. At baseline and 4-week visits, subjects received an oral examination, gingivitis (MGI), gingival bleeding (BI) and plaque (PI) assessments. Following randomization, subjects began rinsing with 20 mL of the assigned mouthrinse for 30 seconds, in conjunction with their usual oral hygiene, twice daily for the duration of the study. Results: All rinses were well tolerated by the subjects. EO was statistically significantly superior to CPC with a reduction in mean MGI of 5.9%, and in mean PI of 6.4%. Statistically significant reductions in gingivitis, bleeding and plaque were observed for both EO and CPC when compared to the negative control; mean MGI and mean PI were reduced by 13.0% and 18.9% for EO and by 7.6% and 13.3% for CPC. EO also statistically significantly reduced the proportion of gingival bleeding sites compared to CPC by 7.6% (P = 0.012) and compared to control by 10.6% (P < 0.001). For the post hoc sitewise analyses, at 4 weeks, the mean percentage of healthy sites for EO, CPC and Control were 7.4%, 1.1% and 0.8%, respectively and the mean percentage of virtually plaque free sites for EO, CPC and control were 5.4%, 3.8% and 0.4% respectively. The mean percentages of more inflamed gingival sites for EO, CPC and control were 20.4%, 26.2% and 45.7%, respectively. The mean percentage of tooth surfaces with heavier accumulations of plaque (PI scores ≥ 3) was 50.9% for EO, 56.1% for CPC and 81.1% for control. Reduction of gingival inflammation and dental plaque was statistically significantly superior for EO compared to both 0.075% CPC and negative control. Both marketed antimicrobial mouthrinses showed a beneficial result in gingival health and in reducing plaque accumulation as early as 4 weeks.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate whether the application of ethanol to a two-step self-etching adhesive can improve its resin-dentin bond performance. Methods: Four different ethanol concentrations were added to the adhesive of Clearfil SE Bond to create four ethanol primers (40, 60, 80 or 100% ethanol). 24 extracted third molars were divided into four groups. Each group corresponded to one of the four hydrophobic ethanol primer concentrations. The teeth in the control group were bonded with Clearfil SE Bond according to the manufacturer's instructions. The primed teeth in the experimental groups were treated with the ethanol primer prior to application of the solvent-free adhesive. Microtensile bond strengths (mTBS) were tested 24 hours after specimen preparation. Another 14 teeth were bonded using the same methods to evaluate mTBS after 1 year. Nanoleakage was evaluated under field-emission scanning electron microscopy before and after aging. Results: In the 24-hour group, the mTBS in the 60% ethanol/40% adhesive primer group increased significantly (21.6%, P < 0.05) over the no ethanol control. After 12-month water storage, the bond strength of that experimental group was still higher than that of the control group (19.5%, P < 0.05). Before aging, the nanoleakage was clearly seen in the control group but hardly any was seen in the experimental group. After aging, the nanoleakage increase in the experimental group was much less than that in the control group.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To compare the efficacy of an anhydrous dentifrice containing 0.454% w/w stannous fluoride and a negative control dentifrice containing 1,000 ppm fluoride, as sodium monofluorophosphate, at reducing dentin hypersensitivity over 8 weeks with twice-daily brushing. Methods: This was a randomized, examiner-blind, parallel, two treatment group, stratified (by maximum baseline Schiff sensitivity score), 8-week clinical study carried out at a single site in 119 healthy subjects with at least two sensitive teeth, who met all study criteria at the screening and baseline visits. Clinical assessments of sensitivity to evaporative (air) [with Schiff sensitivity score and visual analogue scale (VAS)] and tactile (Yeaple probe) stimuli were employed to compare the efficacy of the test dentifrice containing 0.454% w/w stannous fluoride to the negative control dentifrice at reducing sensitivity after 4 and 8 weeks treatment. Results: Of the 119 subjects randomized to study treatment, 113 completed the study. At 4 and 8 weeks, between treatment analyses found the test dentifrice to be significantly better than the negative control dentifrice in relieving dentin hypersensitivity for all measures (Schiff: P < 0.0001 at 4 and 8 weeks; VAS score: P = 0.0003 at 4 weeks, P < 0.0001 at 8 weeks; tactile threshold: P = 0.0138 at 4 weeks, P < 0.0001 at 8 weeks).
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · American journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate the in vitro shear bond strength of two adhesives to bovine dentin contaminated with various astringents. Methods: 120 adult bovine incisors were collected and cut to obtain 240 specimens. The specimens were randomly divided into a self-etch adhesive group (N = 120) and a total-etch adhesive group (N = 120). Both of the groups were divided into the following six subgroups: the non-contamination group and the contamination groups 25% Al2(SO4)3 (Orbat sensitive), 25% AlCl3 (Racestyptine), 10% AlCl3 (Roeko Gingiva Liquid), 15.5% Fe2(SO4)3 (Astringedent) and AlCl3 Paste (Astringent Retraction Paste, N = 20 in each subgroup). Each astringent was applied for 1 minute to the dentin surface before rinsing with water spray for 20 seconds. The respective adhesive was then applied according to the manufacturer's instructions. Two composite cylinders were shaped with a mold, cured on the dentin surface of each specimen and sheared off after 1 day and 1 week storage. The shear bond strengths (MPa) were recorded and analyzed with ANOVA. Results: In the self-etching adhesive group, all astringents showed negative effects on dentin bonding (P < 0.05). Astringent contamination did not have a negative effect on dentin bonding in the total-etch adhesive group (P > 0.05).
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · American journal of dentistry

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · American journal of dentistry