Infectious Disease Clinics of North America (INFECT DIS CLIN N AM)

Publisher: WB Saunders

Journal description

Each issue of Infectious Disease Clinics reviews new diagnostic and management techniques for a single clinical problem--and makes them simple to apply. Its concise, comprehensive, and its editors and authors are respected experts.

Current impact factor: 2.73

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.733
2013 Impact Factor 2.312
2012 Impact Factor 2.626
2011 Impact Factor 3.029
2010 Impact Factor 3
2009 Impact Factor 2.29
2008 Impact Factor 2.052
2007 Impact Factor 1.95
2006 Impact Factor 1.642
2005 Impact Factor 2.25
2004 Impact Factor 3.122
2003 Impact Factor 1.97
2002 Impact Factor 1.781
2001 Impact Factor 2.46
2000 Impact Factor 2.631
1999 Impact Factor 2.938
1998 Impact Factor 1.796
1997 Impact Factor 1.071
1996 Impact Factor 1.046
1995 Impact Factor 1.337
1994 Impact Factor 0.852

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.57
Cited half-life 8.40
Immediacy index 0.34
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.98
Website Infectious Disease Clinics website
Other titles Infectious disease clinics of North America, Infectious disease clinics
ISSN 0891-5520
OCLC 14781687
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

WB Saunders

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject-based repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/07/2015
    • 'WB Saunders' is an imprint of 'Elsevier'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Some infections will result in anogenital warts and anogenital or oropharyngeal cancers. Preventing HPV infection is a public health priority to reduce cancer and HPV-associated complications. Prevention through vaccination is the most cost-effective and lifesaving intervention to decrease the burden of HPV-related cancers and other HPV-associated diseases. It is critical for pediatricians to make a strong recommendation for early and timely vaccination and completion of the 3-dose series. The goal of early vaccination is to immunize before first exposure to HPV virus.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of meningococcal disease is at an historic low in the United States, but prevention remains a priority because of the devastating outcomes and risk for outbreaks. Available vaccines are recommended routinely for persons at increased risk for disease to protect against all major serogroups of Neisseria meningitidis circulating in the United States. Although vaccination has virtually eliminated serogroup A meningococcal outbreaks from the Meningitis Belt of Africa and reduced the incidence of serogroup C disease worldwide, eradication of N meningitidis will unlikely be achieved by currently available vaccines because of the continued carriage and transmission of nonencapsulated organisms.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Children are traveling to regions of the world that could pose a risk of acquiring diseases such as malaria, dermatosis, and infectious diarrhea. Most of these can be prevented by modifying high-risk behaviors or through the use of medications. Many of these same regions are endemic with diseases that are preventable through vaccination. Clinicians must be able to effectively prepare their pediatric-age travelers for international travel. Preventive education, prophylactic and self-treating medications, and vaccinations are all important components of this preparation. Familiarity with the use of travel vaccines is imperative.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Universal immunization of infants and toddlers with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines over the last 15 years has dramatically altered the landscape of pneumococcal disease. Decreases in invasive pneumococcal disease, all-cause pneumonia, empyema, mastoiditis, acute otitis media, and complicated otitis media have been reported from multiple countries in which universal immunization has been implemented. Children with comorbid conditions have higher rates of pneumococcal disease and increased case fatality rates compared with otherwise healthy children, and protection for the most vulnerable pediatric patients will require new strategies to address the underlying host susceptibility and the expanded spectrum of serotypes observed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Influenza infects 5% to 20% of school-age children annually. Although universal influenza vaccine is recommended for children and adults 6 months of age and older, uptake is below national targets. Influenza immunization of the child and the family is the key to decreasing annual disease burden. Antiviral therapy is an important treatment strategy for children and adults, especially those who are at high risk of complications from influenza, irrespective of immunization status or whether illness onset is greater than 48 hours. Although antiviral therapy may also be used for pre-exposure and postexposure prophylaxis, it should not replace immunization as a preventive strategy when immunization is feasible.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of infectious health care-associated diarrhea and is a major burden to patients and the health care system. The incidence and severity of CDI remain at historically high levels. This article reviews the morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with CDI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming anaerobic gram-positive organism that is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated nosocomial infectious diarrhea in the Western world. This article describes the evolving epidemiology of C difficile infection (CDI) in the twenty-first century, evaluates the importance of vaccines against the disease, and defines the roles of both innate and adaptive host immune responses in CDI. The effects of passive immunotherapy and active vaccination against CDI in both humans and animals are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is important not only for patient care but also for epidemiology and disease research. As it is not possible clinically to reliably differentiate CDI from other causes of health care-associated diarrhea, the laboratory confirmation of CDI is essential. Rapid commercial assays, including nucleic acid amplification tests and immunoassays for C difficile toxin and glutamate dehydrogenase, have largely superseded the use of older assays. Although assays that detect the presence of free C difficile toxin in feces are less frequently positive than tests for organism, they are preferable for the detection of CDI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acquisition of Clostridium difficile spores can be followed by a spectrum of clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic transit through the bowel to severe colitis and death. This clinical variability is a product of bacterial virulence and host susceptibility to the pathogen. It is important to identify patients at high risk of poor outcome so that increased monitoring and optimal treatment strategies can be instigated. This article discusses the evidence linking strain type to clinical outcome, including the importance of toxin and nontoxin virulence factors. It reviews host factors and their relationship with C difficile infection susceptibility, recurrence, and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes the global changes in Clostridium difficile epidemiology since the late twentieth century and into the twenty-first century when the new epidemic strain BI/NAP1/027 emerged. The article provides an overview of how understanding of C difficile epidemiology has rapidly evolved since its initial association with colitis in 1974. It also discusses how C difficile has spread across the globe, the role of asymptomatic carriers in disease transmission, the increased recognition of C difficile outside health care settings, the changes in epidemiology of C difficile infection in children, and the risk factors for disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: The view of Clostridium difficile infection as a hospital-acquired infection transmitted only by symptomatic patients is changing. Although C difficile is present in food for human consumption, food-borne infection caused by C difficile has never been confirmed. More information on the infective dose and the level of contamination is needed to determine the risk for food-borne exposure to C difficile in humans. The emergence of C difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 078 in humans is epidemiologically linked to its presence in piglets and calves and their environment, suggesting zoonotic transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: In vivo and in vitro models are widely used to simulate Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). They have made considerable contributions in the study of C difficile pathogenesis, antibiotic predisposition to CDI, and population dynamics as well as the evaluation of new antimicrobial and immunologic therapeutics. Although CDI models have greatly increased understanding of this complicated pathogen, all have limitations in reproducing human disease, notably their inability to generate a truly reflective immune response. This review summarizes the most commonly used models of CDI and discusses their pros and cons and their predictive values in terms of clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Infectious Disease Clinics of North America