American journal of health promotion: AJHP (AM J HEALTH PROMOT)

Publisher: American Journal of Health Promotion

Journal description

Founded in 1986, the American Journal of Health Promotion was the first peer reviewed journal devoted to health promotion and it remains the largest. Our editorial goal is to provide a forum for the many diverse disciplines that contribute to health promotion and to reduce the gap between health promotion research and practice. This is the journal of the Heart-Centered Therapies Association.

Current impact factor: 2.37

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 1.547

Additional details

5-year impact 2.65
Cited half-life 8.30
Immediacy index 0.32
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.91
Website American Journal of Health Promotion website
Other titles American journal of health promotion, Health promotion, AJHP
ISSN 0890-1171
OCLC 13830677
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

American Journal of Health Promotion

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
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  • Classification
    white

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . We aimed to understand how employer characteristics relate to the use of incentives to promote participation in wellness programs and to explore the relationship between incentive type and participation rates. Design . A cross-sectional analysis of nationally representative survey data combined with an administrative business database was employed. Settings/Subjects . Random sampling of U.S. companies within strata based on industry and number of employees was used to determine a final sample of 3000 companies. Of these, 19% returned completed surveys. Measures . The survey asked about employee participation rate, incentive type, and gender composition of employees. Incentive types included any incentives, high-value rewards, and rewards plus penalties. Analysis . Logistic regressions of incentive type on employer characteristics were used to determine what types of employers are more likely to offer which type of incentives. A generalized linear model of participation rate was used to determine the relationship between incentive type and participation. Results . Employers located in the Northeast were 5 to 10 times more likely to offer incentives. Employers with a large number of employees, particularly female employees, were up to 1.25 times more likely to use penalties. Penalty and high-value incentives were associated with participation rates of 68% and 52%, respectively. Conclusion . Industry or regional characteristics are likely determinants of incentive use for wellness programs. Penalties appear to be effective, but attention should be paid to what types of employees they affect.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . We combined data from the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection (NBCCEDP) and Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation (WISEWOMAN) programs in South Carolina to assess whether cancer screening outcomes in NBCCEDP impacted participation in WISEWOMAN lifestyle interventions, and whether the status of WISEWOMAN baseline risk factors (obesity, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and smoking) determined subsequent completion of lifestyle interventions. Design . Case-control. Setting . Three WISEWOMAN implementation sites in South Carolina. Subjects . The study comprised 7841 NBCCDEP participants in three WISEWOMAN program sites. The two programs serve financially disadvantaged women. Measures . Outcome measures were participation in WISEWOMAN lifestyle interventions and completion of lifestyle interventions. The main predictor measures were cancer screening outcomes and baseline chronic disease risk factors. Covariate measures included age, race, body mass index, smoking status, and education. Analysis . We used multivariable logistic regression models to examine the odds of participation in and completion of WISEWOMAN lifestyle interventions. Results . The association between cancer screening outcome and participation in WISEWOMAN lifestyle interventions among NBCCEDP participants differed significantly by education and smoking status. Among smokers or highly educated women, having an outcome of cancer or precancerous lesion through the NBCCEDP screening compared to normal screening outcomes was significantly associated with participation in lifestyle interventions, with odds ratios of 2.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-6.58) for highly educated women and 1.82 (95% CI, 1.00-3.31) for smokers. Similarly, smokers or diabetics were more likely than nonsmokers or nondiabetics, respectively, to complete lifestyle interventions. Conclusion . Nonsmokers and women with lower education in NBCCEDP may need additional navigation to lifestyle interventions in an integrated program implementation approach to improve participation in and completion of WISEWOMAN interventions.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . To explore the relationships of selected health behaviors to medication adherence. Design . A retrospective cohort study. Setting . Data from Korean national health insurance claims between January 2010 and June 2011. Subjects . Patients aged 65 years and older with hypertension (N = 662,170), hyperlipidemia (N = 244,702), or diabetes (N = 179,285). Measures . Medication adherence as a medication possession ratio from January to June 2011 as a dependent variable. The waist circumference (cm) and the body mass index (weight in kilogram divided by height in meter squared) as a marker for obesity. Smoking, drinking, and physical activity as main independent variables. Analysis . A multivariate logistic regression. Results . Nonobese patients, as based on the waist circumference, were more likely to adhere to their medication (by 8.9% for hypertension, 6.2% for diabetes, and 3.5% for hyperlipidemia). Current smokers were less likely to adhere to their medication (by 8.7% for hypertension and 6.8% for diabetes), and moderate and heavy drinkers were also less likely to show medication adherence for diabetes (by 12.9% and 6.4%). Mild physical activity was related to a 1.1% to 1.8% increase in the likelihood of medication adherence across the three disease groups. Conclusion . Health promotion programs for self-care health behaviors of elderly patients should emphasize good medication adherence to achieve successful self-management of diseases.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . To examine the reach, efficacy, and adoption of The Bigger Picture, a type 2 diabetes (T2DM) social marketing campaign that uses spoken-word public service announcements (PSAs) to teach youth about socioenvironmental conditions influencing T2DM risk. Design . A nonexperimental pilot dissemination evaluation through high school assemblies and a Web-based platform were used. Setting . The study took place in San Francisco Bay Area high schools during 2013. Subjects . In the study, 885 students were sampled from 13 high schools. Intervention . A 1-hour assembly provided data, poet performances, video PSAs, and Web-based platform information. A Web-based platform featured the campaign Web site and social media. Measures . Student surveys preassembly and postassembly (knowledge, attitudes), assembly observations, school demographics, counts of Web-based utilization, and adoption were measured. Analysis . Descriptive statistics, McNemar's χ(2) test, and mixed modeling accounting for clustering were used to analyze data. Results . The campaign included 23 youth poet-created PSAs. It reached >2400 students (93% self-identified non-white) through school assemblies and has garnered >1,000,000 views of Web-based video PSAs. School participants demonstrated increased short-term knowledge of T2DM as preventable, with risk driven by socioenvironmental factors (34% preassembly identified environmental causes as influencing T2DM risk compared to 83% postassembly), and perceived greater personal salience of T2DM risk reduction (p < .001 for all). The campaign has been adopted by regional public health departments. Conclusion . The Bigger Picture campaign showed its potential for reaching and engaging diverse youth. Campaign messaging is being adopted by stakeholders.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . The Emory Prevention Research Center's Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network mini-grant program funded faith-based organizations to implement policy and environmental change to promote healthy eating and physical activity in rural South Georgia. This study describes the existing health promotion environment and its relationship to church member behavior. Design . Cross-sectional. Setting . Data were obtained from parishioners of six churches in predominantly rural South Georgia. Subjects . Participants were 319 church members with average age of 48 years, of whom 80% were female and 84% were black/African-American. Measures . Questionnaires assessed perceptions of the existing church health promotion environment relative to nutrition and physical activity, eating behavior and intention to use physical activity facilities at church, and eating and physical activity behaviors outside of church. Analysis . Multiple regression and ordinal logistic regression using generalized estimating equations were used to account for clustered data. Results . Results indicate that delivering messages via sermons and church bulletins, having healthy eating programs, and serving healthy foods are associated with participants' self-reported consumption of healthy foods at church (all p values ≤ .001). Serving more healthy food and less unhealthy food was associated with healthier eating in general but not to physical activity in general (p values ≤ .001). Conclusion . The church environment may play an important role in supporting healthy eating in this setting and more generally.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . Research demonstrates that moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality. Few studies have examined the effects of light-intensity physical activity on mortality. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between objectively measured light-intensity physical activity and all-cause mortality risk. Design . Longitudinal. Setting . National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006 with follow-up through December 31, 2011. Subjects . Five thousand five hundred seventy-five U.S. adults. Measures . Participants wore an accelerometer for at least 4 days and completed questionnaires to assess sociodemographics and chronic disease information, with blood samples taken to assess biological markers. Follow-up mortality status was assessed via death certificate data from the National Death Index. Analysis . Cox proportional hazard model. Results . After adjusting for accelerometer-determined MVPA, age, gender, race-ethnicity, cotinine, weight status, poverty level, C-reactive protein, and comorbid illness, for every 60-minute increase in accelerometer-determined light-intensity physical activity, participants had a 16% reduced hazard of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = .84; 95% confidence interval: .78-.91; p < .001). Conclusion . In this national sample of U.S. adults, light-intensity physical activity was inversely associated with all-cause mortality risk, independent of age, MVPA, and other potential confounders. In addition to MVPA, promotion of light-intensity physical activity is warranted.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . Water pipe tobacco smoking (WTS) is growing in popularity among U.S. young adults and is associated with health risks similar to those of cigarette smoking. The purpose of this study is to examine existing tobacco control policies (TCPs) in order to investigate how they engage WTS. Approach . A systematic synthesis of content and legal interactions among federal, state, and local TCP documents. Setting . Pennsylvania, which represents a politically and demographically diverse microcosm of the United States. Participants . No human subjects. Method . Federal and state TCPs were retrieved via public legal repositories. Local policy searches were conducted via county/municipal Web sites, inclusive of 13 localities that had autonomous health departments or existing TCPs based on a National Cancer Institute report. Full-text TCPs were double coded within a grounded theory framework for health policy analysis. Emergent codes were used to compare and contrast policy texts and to examine legal interactions among TCPs. Results . Examination of policy categories including youth access, use restrictions, and taxation revealed WTS as largely omitted from current TCPs. WTS was sometimes addressed as an "other" tobacco product under older TCPs, though ambiguities in language led to questionable enforceability. State preemptions have rolled back or prevented well-tailored reforms at the local level. Federal preemptions have likewise constrained state TCPs. Conclusion . Outdated, preempted, and unclear policies limit the extent to which TCPs engage WTS. Health advocates might target these aspects of TCP reform.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . To determine the barriers and facilitators associated with willingness to use personal health information management (PHIM) systems to support an existing worksite wellness program (WWP). Design . The study design involved a Web-based survey. Setting . The study setting was a regional hospital. Subjects . Hospital employees comprised the study subjects. Measures . Willingness, barriers, and facilitators associated with PHIM were measured. Analysis . Bivariate logit models were used to model two binary dependent variables. One model predicted the likelihood of believing PHIM systems would positively affect overall health and willingness to use. Another predicted the likelihood of worrying about online security and not believing PHIM systems would benefit health goals. Results . Based on 333 responses, believing PHIM systems would positively affect health was highly associated with willingness to use PHIM systems (p < .01). Those comfortable online were 7.22 times more willing to use PHIM systems. Participants in exercise-based components of WWPs were 3.03 times more likely to be willing to use PHIM systems. Those who worried about online security were 5.03 times more likely to believe PHIM systems would not help obtain health goals. Conclusions . Comfort with personal health information online and exercise-based WWP experience was associated with willingness to use PHIM systems. However, nutrition-based WWPs did not have similar effects. Implementation barriers relate to technology anxiety and trust in security, as well as experience with specific WWP activities. Identifying differences between WWP components and addressing technology concerns before implementation of PHIM systems into WWPs may facilitate improved adoption and usage.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . To estimate workforce participation characteristics and employees' attitudes regarding participation in workplace wellness programs. Design . Data from a statewide stratified random sample were used to compare small (<50 employees) and larger (50+ employees) workplaces to estimate participation in screening programs and likelihood of participation in workplace wellness programs. Setting . A telephone survey of employed Iowans registered to vote. Subjects . Surveyed were 1171 employed Iowans registered to vote, ages 18 to 65. Measure . Among questionnaire survey modules were items from the Wellness Council of America Employee Needs and Interest Survey, the U.S. Census Bureau for employment documentation, and the World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire for assessment of sickness absenteeism and presenteeism. Analysis . Prevalence of participation in screening and wellness programs was analyzed by employment size and levels of likeliness to participate, and multivariable analyses of employee baseline characteristics regarding participation in screening programs and likelihood of participation in wellness programs was presented as top and bottom quartiles. Results . Those employed in smaller workplaces participated less often in screening programs. Multivariable models identified male gender and those with an abnormal body mass index were associated with nonparticipation, while having a primary care physician was associated with participation. Very few items showed significant statistical difference in willingness to participate. Conclusion . Workforce characteristics and access to health care may influence participation in screening and wellness programs. Employment size is not a determining factor for willingness to participate in wellness programs.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a text message-based smoking cessation intervention in China. Design . Study design was a randomized control trial with a 6-month follow-up assessment of smoking status. Setting . Zhejiang, Heilongjiang, and Shaanxi provinces in China provided the study setting. Subjects . A total of 8000 adult smokers in China who used Nokia Life Tools and participated in phase 2 (smoking education via text message) of the study were included. Intervention . The high-frequency text contact (HFTC) group received one to three messages daily containing smoking cessation advice, encouragement, and health education information. The low-frequency text contact (LFTC) group received one weekly message with smoking health effects information. Measures . Our primary outcome was smoking status at 0, 1, 3, and 6 months after intervention. Secondary outcomes include participant perceptions of the HFTC intervention, and factors associated with smoking cessation among HFTC participants. Analysis . Descriptive and χ(2) analyses were conducted to assess smoking status and acceptability. Factors associated with quitting were assessed using multiple logistic regression analyses. Results . Quit rates were high in both the HFTC and LFTC groups (HFTC: 0 month, 27.9%; 1 month, 30.5%; 3 months, 26.7%; and 6 months, 27.7%; LFTC: 0 month, 26.7%; 1 month, 30.4%; 3 months, 28.1%; and 6 months, 27.7%), with no significant difference between the two groups in an intent-to-treat analysis. Attitudes toward the HFTC intervention were largely positive. Conclusion . Our findings suggest that a text message-based smoking cessation intervention can be successfully delivered in China and is acceptable to Chinese smokers, but further research is needed to assess the potential impact of this type of intervention.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . Worksite health promotion (WHP) programs can reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular disease risk factors. State law can encourage employers and employer-provided insurance companies to offer comprehensive WHP programs. This research examines state law authorizing WHP programs. Design . Quantitative content analysis. Setting . Worksites or workplaces. Subjects . United States (and the District of Columbia). Intervention . State law in effect in 2013 authorizing WHP programs. Measures . Frequency and distribution of states with WHP laws. Analysis . To determine the content of the laws for analysis and coding, we identified 18 policy elements, 12 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Worksite Health ScoreCard (HSC) and 6 additional supportive WHP strategies. We used these strategies as key words to search for laws authorizing WHP programs or select WHP elements. We calculated the number and type of WHP elements for each state with WHP laws and selected two case examples from states with comprehensive WHP laws. Results . Twenty-four states authorized onsite WHP programs, 29 authorized WHP through employer-provided insurance plans, and 18 authorized both. Seven states had a comprehensive WHP strategy, addressing 8 or more of 12 HSC elements. The most common HSC elements were weight management, tobacco cessation, and physical activity. Conclusion . Most states had laws encouraging the adoption of WHP programs. Massachusetts and Maine are implementing comprehensive WHP laws but studies evaluating their health impact are needed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . China has a high prevalence of smoking, but the characteristics of social smoking in Chinese college students have not been investigated. We examined the pattern of social smoking and explored the association between social smoking and personal cessation efforts and mental health factors among Chinese male college students. Design . Study design was a cross-sectional survey. Setting . P. R. China was the setting of the study. Subjects . Participants were a random sample of 1327 male college students. Measures . All participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that examined their smoking behaviors and a group of specific mental health factors (loneliness, self-harm, suicide, depression, and anxiety). Analysis . Analysis was conducted using descriptive statistics, χ(2) analysis, and multivariate logistic regression. Results . Of a total of 207 current smokers, 102 (49.3%) were identified as social smokers. Compared with nonsmokers, social smokers had increased risks for depression (odds ratio, 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.65). Among daily smokers, social smokers were less likely to have an intention to quit smoking than nonsocial smokers (odds ratio, .08; 95% confidence interval, .01-.57). Conclusion . This study reveals unique psychologic characteristics related to social smoking. College students are a particular group of interest because unhealthy behaviors initiated during adolescence may continue through adulthood. Our findings provide evidence for future tobacco control intervention among this population.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose . To explore barriers, facilitators, and motivators to adopting and maintaining regular physical activity among women with obesity who have undergone bariatric surgery. Approach . Individual interviews with women 3 to 24 months post-bariatric surgery. Setting . Participants were recruited from a bariatric clinic in Montreal, Canada. Participants . Twelve women were recruited (mean age = 47 ± 9 years) using poster advertisements and word of mouth. Participants were on average 15 months postsurgery. Method . Each woman was interviewed once using a semistructured interview protocol. Recruitment was conducted until data saturation (i.e., no new information emerged). The interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Results . Three interrelated themes emerged: the physical body, appraisal of the physical and social self, and the exercise environment. Barriers included weight-restricted mobility, side effects of surgery, body dissatisfaction, compromised psychological health, competing responsibilities, a lack of exercise self-efficacy and social support, reduced access to accommodating facilities, lack of exercise knowledge, and northern climate. Participants reported postsurgical weight loss, weight and health maintenance, enjoyment, body image, and supportive active relationships, as well as access to accommodating facilities and exercise knowledge, as facilitators and motivators. Conclusion . Suggested physical activity programming strategies for health care professionals working with this unique population are discussed. Physical activity and health promotion initiatives can also benefit from a cultural paradigm shift away from weight-based representations of health.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · American journal of health promotion: AJHP