The International Trade Journal (Int Trade J)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

International Trade Journal is a quarterly journal of high professional standards devoted to both the theoretical and practical aspects of international trade. It is a refereed journal intended for the exchange of ideas among academicians, government officials, and both macro- and micro-practitioners of international trade. Its editorial objective is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of research findings and of significant conceptual or theoretical contributions to the field.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website International Trade Journal website
Other titles International trade journal (Online), The international trade journal
ISSN 0885-3908
OCLC 41545638
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Trade Journal

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Trade Journal

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this article, we conjecture that the speed with which trade flows adjust to exchange rate and relative price changes are faster during post-1990 as compared to pre-1990. We attribute this to the Internet revolution and technological advances that took place during the 1990s. Our hypothesis is supported in 10 out of 16 import and export demand models that are estimated for eight countries. When the models are estimated for the entire sample period, we try to update Orcutt’s (1950) hypothesis that trade flows adjust to exchange rate changes faster than to changes in relative prices. Like previous studies, not much support is found for the later hypothesis and results are country specific.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: How does geography matter for explaining the location patterns of U.S. companies in China? We combine insights from the literature on economic geography and spatial interdependence in foreign direct investment (FDI) activity to provide a comparative analysis using both sectoral regression results and maps that illustrate patterns in the data. We use a unique sample of publicly traded U.S. firms that announced expansion of operations into China between 1980 and 2005. Regression results show that, relative to the tertiary sector, firm characteristics matter more for primary sector firms, whereas province characteristics matter more for secondary sector firms. Additionally, our GIS analysis reveals a high level of locational concentration and differences in provincial characteristics over time. Overall, we find that combining GIS methods with FDI data can provide a richer picture of economic activity that is highly accessible to both academics and practitioners.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Between 1830 and 1913, the Ottoman Empire was involved in destructive wars with its trading partners. Boycotts were organized against Bulgaria and Austria-Hungary. The effects of wars and boycotts are a topic of debate among historians. This article examines whether wars and boycotts were associated with how the Ottoman Empire traded with its trading partners from 1830 to 1913. The findings indicate a decrease in trade with its adversaries during the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–78, the Crimean War, and the Balkan Wars. In addition, there was a statistically significant reduction in trade with Austria-Hungary due to the boycott.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The paper shows that the number of documents required to export and import tend to increase the time cost of shipments. However, this relationship is far from simplistic, varying sharply in magnitude depending on the income level and the size of the country. Specifically, the increase in the time cost of increased documentation is much larger for countries that are relatively poor and large in size. One interpretation of this finding is that the relatively rich countries that have more resources and the relatively small countries that rely more on trade invest more in building efficient documentation systems. Hence, increased documentation adds less to the time cost at the margin as income level rises and country size becomes smaller. At a broader level, our findings suggest caution in interpreting how input-based measures such as the number of required documents to trade affect the quality of the business environment as far as the associated cost is concerned.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It is well established that democracy affects trade, but how does this relationship change over time? The results suggest that democracy increases trade openness both in the short and long run. However, democracy only leads to a reduction in trade restrictions in the short term. In addition, the durability of a polity is employed as an instrument in order to consider the possibility that democracy and trade are endogenously related. This method helps to isolate a causal effect of democracy on trade, and the results suggest that the economic effect of democracy is 2–3 times larger than under OLS.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The International Trade Journal

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Emerging economies face a complex environment as of April 2015, mostly as a result of a slowdown in global growth, an increased risk of capital flow reversals, and a reduction in the price of oil. Due to the effects of this reduction on external and fiscal balance, the environment is particularly adverse for oil-exporting countries. This article reviews the different channels through which the environment entails financial risk for emerging economies, focusing on Mexico, an emerging and oil-exporting country. Our analysis reveals that this country faces several macro-financial policy challenges stemming from the aforementioned financial risks.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since its pre-colonial history, Mexico has demonstrated two contrary tendencies: the outward-looking, global trader and the protective, nationalist instinct. Today, the seven major constitutional reforms of the PRI government reflect the former. However, the teacher’s union, some presidential advisors, and the criminal justice system reflect a preference for the latter. The more progressive sectors of Mexican society assert the need to participate in the global economy, but latent protective and nationalist tendencies throw up challenges. This article examines several contemporary examples of each tendency and demonstrates how they coexist uneasily in modern Mexico.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this article, I explore the characteristics of businesses that use mobile money by using the World Bank’s Enterprise Surveys Program data set for the year 2013. I study firms in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. My analysis shows that small firms are more likely to use the service than medium and large firms. Also, older firms are more likely to use the service than younger ones. Moreover, firms with bank accounts are more likely to use the service. Finally, firms in Kenya are more likely to use the service than firms in Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) engaged in a series of extraordinary monetary policy actions in the wake of the Global Financial Crisis of 2007–2008 to support economic activity in the United States. Interest rates were lowered to their effective lower bound and the Fed’s balance sheet was greatly expanded through a series of large-scale asset purchase programs. As the U.S. economy has recovered, “normalization” of monetary policy (which will be data-dependent) has drawn closer. This article reviews some factors that may impact the post-normalization course of monetary policy.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The International Trade Journal

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Given Canada’s extended geography and regional economic diversity, individual provinces have differing exposures to particular international trade agreements. We demonstrate this by estimating the impacts of the Canada-Korea free trade agreement on the province of Ontario, using a dynamic general equilibrium model to generate Canada-level impacts, which are then decomposed on the basis of partial equilibrium model simulations on a trade dataset in which Ontario is represented as a separate international trading entity. We show that geography and sectoral specialization matter and that general equilibrium effects must be taken into account in partial equilibrium assessments of sectoral impacts of major trade agreements.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The International Trade Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines the potential economic effects that the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) had on Texas—an oil-producing, large border state. We estimate a five- variable vector autoregressive (VAR) model with quarterly data from January 1976 to March 2011 and construct a structural VAR representation by imposing long-term restrictions to identify U.S. aggregate, oil price, and Texas-specific shocks. After compar- ing responses to these structural shocks before and after NAFTA, our results suggest that NAFTA contributed to Texas’ economy, becoming more resilient to oil price and non-Texas disruptions.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · The International Trade Journal