MRS Bulletin (MRS BULL)

Publisher: Materials Research Society, Cambridge University Press (CUP)

Journal description

MRS Bulletin is one of the most widely recognized and highly respected publications in advanced materials research. Each month, the Bulletin provides a comprehensive overview of a specific materials theme, along with industry and policy developments, and MRS and materials-community news and events. Written by leading experts, the overview articles are useful references for specialists, but are also presented at a level understandable to a broad scientific audience.

Current impact factor: 5.67

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 5.667
2013 Impact Factor 5.069
2012 Impact Factor 5.024
2011 Impact Factor 4.95
2010 Impact Factor 4.747
2009 Impact Factor 6.33
2008 Impact Factor 5.29
2007 Impact Factor 5.168
2006 Impact Factor 5.671
2005 Impact Factor 3.944
2004 Impact Factor 3.444
2003 Impact Factor 3.586
2002 Impact Factor 3.242
2001 Impact Factor 2.606
2000 Impact Factor 3.877
1999 Impact Factor 4.849
1998 Impact Factor 3.376
1997 Impact Factor 1.627
1996 Impact Factor 1.533
1995 Impact Factor 1.616
1994 Impact Factor 1.173
1993 Impact Factor 1.078

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 5.42
Cited half-life 7.00
Immediacy index 0.99
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 2.08
Website MRS Bulletin website
ISSN 0883-7694
OCLC 163128165
Material type Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Cambridge University Press (CUP)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's Pre-print on author's personal website, departmental website, social media websites, institutional repository, non-commercial subject-based repositories, such as PubMed Central, Europe PMC or arXiv
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website on acceptance of publication
    • Author's post-print on departmental website, institutional repository, non-commercial subject-based repositories, such as PubMed Central, Europe PMC or arXiv, after a 6 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published abstract may be deposited
    • Pre-print to record acceptance for publication
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher last reviewed on 09/10/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Cambridge University Press (CUP)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Atomic-scale characterization of interfaces in ceramic materials is needed in order to fully understand their electronic, ionic, mechanical, magnetic, and optical properties. The latest development of laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT), as well as new specimen preparation methods, have opened the realm of ceramics for structural and chemical characterization with high sensitivity and nearly atomic spatial resolution. This article reviews recent APT investigations of interfaces in thin nitride films and thermally grown oxides: TiAlN layers and oxide scales on alumina- and chromia-formers and Zr alloys. The selected examples highlight the role of interfaces in the decomposition of films and in transport processes.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews post-analysis processing methods for data acquired using atom probe tomography (APT). Field-induced aberrations of APT images arise from distorted ion flight trajectories and differences in ion evaporation rates. Addressing this issue requires the development of image processing tools that yield three-dimensionally reconstructed images that reliably reflect the original specimens. One of the biggest advantages of the APT technique is its ability to collect information about millions of individual atoms. Understanding these data requires the development of mathematical and statistical data mining tools, involving disciplines beyond the basic physics of APT. The above issues have important implications for addressing materials science-related questions.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: As the characteristic length scale of electronic devices shrinks, so does the required scale for measurement techniques to provide useful feedback during development and fabrication. The current capabilities of atom probe tomography (APT), such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or studying diffusion effects in a nanowire (NW), make this technique important for metrology on the nanoscale. Here we review recent APT investigations applied to transistors (including regions such as gate oxide, channel, source, drain, contacts, etc.), heterogeneous dopant incorporation in NWs, and Pt-based nanoparticles.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: This article provides a brief introduction to third-order nonlinear optical materials, including both the real and imaginary components, and is intended to be a personal perspective of the field. It describes applications that can be enabled by molecules with large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections and how symmetrical donor–(π-bridge)–donor molecules exhibit large cross sections associated with significant changes in quadrupole moment between the ground- and first-excited electronic states. The application of such materials for 2PA three-dimensional microfabrication is described. The article then turns its focus to materials for all-optical switching applications and explains how cyanine-like molecules can be developed to have both very large real third-order nonlinear coefficients and small 2PA cross sections, both of which are necessary for efficient all-optical switching materials.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: A series of recent instrumental advances have facilitated the application of atom probe tomography (APT) to the characterization of an increasingly wide range of materials and devices. Whereas APT was previously mostly limited to the analysis of alloys, advances in areas such as laser pulsing and detectors have enabled characterization of semiconductors and brittle materials. Most recently, ultraviolet laser pulsing has facilitated the analysis of materials previously considered not viable for the atom probe, such as minerals and large bandgap insulator materials. The development of in situ gas reaction cells fully integrated in atom probe instruments has enabled the characterization of surface reactions of materials exposed to highly controlled environments. Finally, current work toward an integrated cryo-transfer system is anticipated to create new directions for APT research.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · MRS Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: From the photoinduced transport of energy that accompanies photosynthesis to the transcontinental transmission of optical data that enable the Internet, our world relies and thrives on optical signals. To highlight the importance of optics to society, the United Nations designated 2015 as The International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies. Although conventional optical technologies are limited by diffraction, plasmons - collective oscillations of free electrons in a conductor - allow optical signals to be tailored with nanoscale precision. Following decades of fundamental research, several plasmonic technologies have now emerged on the market, and numerous industrial breakthroughs are imminent. This article highlights recent industrially relevant advances in plasmonics, including plasmonic materials and devices for energy; for medical sensing, imaging, and therapeutics; and for information technology. Some of the most exciting industrial applications include solar-driven water purifiers, cell phone Raman spectrometers, high-density holographic displays, photothermal cancer therapeutics, and nanophotonic integrated circuits. We describe the fundamental scientific concepts behind these and related technologies, as well as the successes and challenges associated with technology transfer.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · MRS Bulletin
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    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · MRS Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: I look 50 years into the future of materials science to assess possible technological advances and their impacts on engineering, society, and culture. Themes such as cities, energy, food and drink, and healthcare are explored in terms of their materials requirements and our likelihood of fulfilling them. Possible directions for materials science and engineering are explored, such as metamaterials and technical textiles, along with their potential impacts on human expression in design, fashion, and architecture. As the number of available materials increases, I assess the likelihood that the methodology of materials development itself might evolve. Will experiments continue to dominate, or will approaches that combine big data and theory become more important forms of materials discovery? Or, more controversially, will our 10,000-year-old track record of materials innovation come to an end, as we run out of new materials to invent?
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · MRS Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, we review recent research progress on ultraflexible organic thin-film devices and their emerging applications. We describe progress on devices such as organic thin-film transistors, organic photovoltaic cells, and organic light-emitting diodes that are manufactured on ultrathin plastic films with micrometer-scale thicknesses. These ultraflexible organic devices have been utilized to realize new applications, including wearable and biomedical devices.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · MRS Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: Concrete is the most used material on Earth except for water. Thus, there is much to be gained through improvements in the manufacturing of cement and the production of concrete to meet societal demand in a sustainable manner. This article reviews recent developments in three areas that have the potential to transform the ways in which infrastructure is specified, designed, and constructed: (1) expanding the use of supplementary cementitious materials and the identification of alternative supplementary cementitious materials, (2) growing the use of alternative cements and binder technologies, and (3) developing alternative reinforcement options. Strategies to facilitate the transfer of these emerging and next-generation materials and technologies from the research arena into real structures are also discussed.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · MRS Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: Mimicking the resilience offered by hard biomaterials, such as mollusk shells and beaks, has been among the most sought-after engineering pursuits. Technological advances in fabrication methods have provided pathways for using different materials to create architected structural metamaterials with hierarchy and length scales similar to those found in nature. Inspiration from nature has led to the creation of structural metamaterials, or nanolattices, with enhanced mechanical properties caused by hierarchical ordering at various length scales, ranging from angstroms and nanometers for the material microstructure to microns and millimeters for the macroscale architecture. The inherent periodicity and high surface-area-to-volume ratios of nanolattices make them useful for a variety of applications, including photonics, photovoltaics, phononics, and electrochemical systems. This article provides an overview of current three-dimensional architected metamaterials, including their fabrication methods, properties, applications, and limitations.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · MRS Bulletin