East African journal of public health (East Afr J Publ Health)

Publisher: East African Public Health Association

Journal description

The East African Journal of Public Health is a multi-disciplinary journal publishing scientific research work from a range of public health related disciplines including community medicine, epidemiology, nutrition, behavioural sciences, health promotion, health education, communicable and non-communicable disease. The journal also engages in, and responds to, current scientific and policy debates, including methodological issues in public health research.

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Website East African Journal of Public Health website
Other titles East African journal of public health (Online), EAJPH
ISSN 0856-8960
OCLC 163567082
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · East African journal of public health

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · East African journal of public health
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to assess patient’s basic knowledge on their own Human Immunodeficiency viral infection care and treatment, and socio-demographic determinants of such knowledge. Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted at the Muhimbili National Hospital HIV clinic between August and September 2013 among HIV infected adults. Socio-demographic data was collected. Ten knowledge questions were used to assess patients’ basic knowledge on HIV care and treatment. Patients were considered knowledgeable if they scored � 80 percent in the knowledge questions and not knowledgeable if they scored <80 percent. CTC card number 1 and 2 were used to verify information given by patients. Chi square and Fisher’s exact test were used to compare categorical variables. Determinants of the knowledge were analyzed using logistic regression. P value of � 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 267 patients participated in the study. Majority was females (76%), age � 36 years (68.5%), jobless (35.2%) and those with education below secondary level (68.1%). Generally, 57.3% (153/267) of the respondents had basic knowledge on their HIV care and treatment. Age group 18-25 years had high percentage of knowledgeable respondents (12/14, 85.7%), p=0.029, so were those with secondary and post-secondary education (36/46, 78.3%), p=0.002, those who got HIV information from multiple sources (70/91, 76.9%), p<0.001, and those with HIV infection for � 8 years (60/76, 75.9%). Females were more likely to know the indications for trimethoprimsulphamethoxazole chemoprophylaxis and effects of unprotected sex while using ARV than were men, p= 0.005, and 0.004 respectively. Conclusion: Fewer patients were knowledgeable. Knowledge was influenced by young age, secondary and post-secondary education, mixed sources of HIV information and longer duration of HIV disease. Predictors of knowledge were level of education, source of HIV information and duration of HIV.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · East African journal of public health
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    ABSTRACT: Immunization is effective in the reduction of child infant morbidity and mortality. The client factors that influence under-five child guardian compliance to the immunization schedule are interlinked based on household characteristics, socioeconomic status of the family, and maternal health practices. An incentive to motivate the mothers to prioritize their child’s health practices especially on vaccination works perfectly towards the achievement of full immunization coverage. In this paper, sampled study carried out in Weonia Location, Trans Nzoia County in March 2014 whose target population were children under the age of five years. A multinomial logistic regression model used to analyze the determinant of partial or non-immunized. Maternal health practices and access to a motivating intervention are significant factors that ensure a parent/guardian’s compliance to their child immunization. The study recommends sustainability and diversification of incentive as well as education of the community on the essence of vaccination.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · East African journal of public health

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · East African journal of public health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Developing countries with increasing service needs and shortage of skilled health workers, governments are investing in community health worker (CHW) programs to address rural health needs. With current renewed interest in CHWs in Tanzania, questions have arisen surrounding the age group composition of this health worker cadre. This study investigated age differences in characteristics, knowledge, and service delivery among CHWs working on maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) in rural Tanzania. Methods: A quantitative survey was administered to all CHWs that received training from December 2012 to July 2013 in five administrative districts of Morogoro Region, Tanzania where the community integrated MNCH program is being implemented. Program monitoring and evaluation forms provided detailed records of service delivery during CHW home visits. Data on CHW socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, and service delivery was analyzed through bi- and multivariate analyses. Composite scores were generated across ten knowledge domains: pregnancy, postpartum, newborn, and child care, family planning, injury and infection prevention, malaria, nutrition, and HIV. Ordered logit models were used to estimate relationships between knowledge scores and predictor variables. Results: Among ninety seven percent of the eligible 238 Community Health Workers interviewed, the highest percentage (37%) was in the age group above 35 years. A variation in gender was not significant among different age groups. However there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) in marital status, education levels, use of English language, number of dependants, and income from agriculture among CHWs of different age groups. No Significant differences by age group in MNCH knowledge were observed even after controlling for education, gender, date of training, income, and socio-economic status. There was no significant difference in most CHW service provision across different age groups except for ability to working with other CHW programs and duration of working as CHW, of which both proportion and mean respectively were increasing as the age increases (p<0.05). Conclusions: This study showed that apart from some slight differences, there was no statistical difference in CHW knowledge retention, and service provision for MNCH across different age groups. However there was a significant difference in their demographic characteristics that may affect guidelines defining CHWs recruitment and retentions criteria in Tanzania. Besides other criteria for CHW recruitment in rural areas age factor should also be considered to ensure retention of this carder. Further analysis on other social determinants and comparison with qualitative research is indicated to better understand the implications of the social profile of CHWs on the effectiveness and sustainability of the program.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · East African journal of public health
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Hygiene and sanitation in Tanzania is one of the areas suffering from chronic neglect. Sanitation and hygiene is still low on the agenda of political platforms and receives a low priority among the community members and public sector. Competing priorities such as education and health (especially curative) contribute significantly in making sanitation and hygiene an area of low priority from the household to the national levels. Local government authorities have been implementing various interventions pertaining to improvement of sanitation and hygiene practices but they have not achieved the results to the expectation of the community. The study aimed at exploring the barriers facing local governance in the implementation of sanitation and hygiene promotion services and recommends possible solutions to overcoming them. Methods: A qualitative research method was employed whereby in-depth interviews were used to obtain information from 16 Key Informants. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and content analytical approach was employed to analyze the data. Findings: Results from this study identified several major barriers facing the implementation of sanitation and hygiene promotion services at the local government authorities. These include fragmented coordination; unclear roles and responsibilities; weak collaboration with stakeholders to scale up promotion; low participation in planning processes among stakeholders and inadequate financial and human resources. Conclusion: The study concludes that there are a number of barriers that hinder an effective implementation of sanitation and hygiene services in the district. The local authorities should put in place good local governance mechanism that is capable of integrating well the sanitation and hygiene services to the local development activities.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · East African journal of public health

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · East African journal of public health
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess women’s satisfaction with health facility delivery care services and to determine the factors associated with satisfaction. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in 12 primary health facilities in Lindi and Mtwara rural districts. All women who gave birth in the facilities during the time of the study were interviewed using a pretested structured questionnaire. The questionnaire contained 29 items on likert scale including different aspects of delivery care service. Women were considered to be satisfied if they reported satisfaction to at least half of the items assessed. Results: Total of 504 women were interviewed. Overall a large proportion (80%) reported to be satisfied with the delivery care services. Proportion satisfied varied in different aspects of care ranging from 30% reporting to be satisfied with management of labour pains to 96% reporting to be satisfied with care of the newborn. Only age of the mother showed significant association with satisfaction. Women with formal education and those delivering for the first time were satisfied compared to their counterparts although the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion and recommendations: Majority of women reported satisfaction with delivery services but there were significant variations across different care items. High levels of dissatisfaction were on aspects of provider client communication, labour pain management and drugs availability issues. Training of health providers on communication skills and ensuring availability of drugs should be prioritized. Allowing a companion during labour may be considered since it has been proven to make women comfortable and satisfied with the process of delivery elsewhere. Key words: delivery care services, satisfaction, factors influencing satisfaction, Tanzania
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · East African journal of public health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: In Tanzania, enrolment into care and treatment centers (CTC) for those in need of anti-retroviral therapy is estimated to be 22.2%, indicating that the gateway to accessing CTC services is being underutilized. It is well-known that barriers to accessing these services affect women disproportionately, particularly during pregnancy when prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) is most needed. This study explored factors associated with CTC enrolment of HIV infected pregnant women and mothers who are refereed from PMTCT services in Morogoro, Tanzania. Methods: A cross sectional quantitative study was conducted in 30% (16) of all the available health facilities that provide RCH service in the Morogoro rural district of Tanzania. All HIV infected pregnant women and mothers attending RCH services on the day of data collection were recruited and interviewed at exit using semi-structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 93 (72.1%) out of the recruited 129 HIV infected mothers had been referred from PMTCT and enrolled into CTC services. Social demographic characteristics such as age, marital status, education and parity showed no statistical significant association with CTC enrolment. Although factors such as distance to clinic, transport cost to clinic and possession of phone contact of provider were highly associated with CTC enrollment in the bi-variate analysis, this association disappeared after multivariate analysis. Subsequently, the multivariate analysis revealed that disclosure of HIV status to spouse (χ2 value =28.4; P value< 0.001.) and home visits by CHWs were statistically significantly associated with enrollment into CTC services. Conclusion: Disclosure of one’s HIV status to a spouse and home visits by CHWs were found to be highly associated with CTC enrolment. These findings suggest that despite women’s apprehension about HIV status disclosure because they fear stigmatization, PMTCT providers should continue to encourage them to share their HIV status with their partners. Providers should also encourage CHWs to visit homes to encourage pregnant women and lactating mothers to enroll into CTC services, in order to improve continuity of service utilization from PMTCT to CTC enrolment and to other Maternal and Newborn Child Health services.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · East African journal of public health
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    ABSTRACT: Open Access Subscription or Fee Access Evaluation of oral health among pregnant women in a Nigerian population AO Afolabi, MA Adedigba, VT Adekanmbi Abstract Objective: This study evaluates the oral health knowledge and practise among pregnant women in a Nigerian population. Consecutive pregnant women attending three tertiary level of care were recruited. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to assessing socio-demographic variables, dental visiting habits, oral hygiene habits and oral health awareness. Results Four hundred and eighty participated in this study out of which 263 (54.8%) had low oral health knowledge and had never visited dentist before 362 (75.4%). The odds of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by about 2 folds when the respondent is older than 35 years compared to less than 20 years. Also, the likelihood of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by 127% if the respondents had oral disease compared to those without oral disease. Presence of gum swelling has 3 folds increase on oral hygiene knowledge than those without it. Dental visit has the odd of increasing oral hygiene knowledge by 5 folds compared with non visiting. Also, the likelihood of practising high oral hygiene reduced by 82% if the respondent visited dentist when had complaint compared to those who had visited dentist only once. Respondents who had been advised by a dentist on oral hygiene before were 146% more likely to have high oral hygiene in pregnancy when compared with those who had not been advised before. Conclusion: The oral health knowledge of the pregnant women was very low. Hence, a special dental program should be designed to meet the needs of the pregnant women. Key words: Pregnant women oral knowledge and practise Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Objective: This study evaluates the oral health knowledge and practise among pregnant women in a Nigerian population. Consecutive pregnant women attending three tertiary level of care were recruited. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to assessing socio-demographic variables, dental visiting habits, oral hygiene habits and oral health awareness. Results Four hundred and eighty participated in this study out of which 263 (54.8%) had low oral health knowledge and had never visited dentist before 362 (75.4%). The odds of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by about 2 folds when the respondent is older than 35 years compared to less than 20 years. Also, the likelihood of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by 127% if the respondents had oral disease compared to those without oral disease. Presence of gum swelling has 3 folds increase on oral hygiene knowledge than those without it. Dental visit has the odd of increasing oral hygiene knowledge by 5 folds compared with non visiting. Also, the likelihood of practising high oral hygiene reduced by 82% if the respondent visited dentist when had complaint compared to those who had visited dentist only once. Respondents who had been advised by a dentist on oral hygiene before were 146% more likely to have high oral hygiene in pregnancy when compared with those who had not been advised before. Conclusion: The oral health knowledge of the pregnant women was very low. Hence, a special dental program should be designed to meet the needs of the pregnant women. Key words: Pregnant women oral knowledge and practise
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · East African journal of public health