Journal of Pulp and Paper Science (J PULP PAP SCI)

Publisher: Canadian Pulp and Paper Association. Technical Section

Journal description

The Journal of Pulp and Paper Science (JPPS) is a quarterly publication devoted to the science of pulp and paper. Its aim is to publish articles that illuminate the underlying scientific principles of the technology of pulp and paper rather than those that are of a purely technological or engineering nature. JPPS is published by the Pulp and Paper Technical Association of Canada (PAPTAC).

Current impact factor: 0.68

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2012 Impact Factor 0.68
2011 Impact Factor 0.26
2010 Impact Factor 0.695
2009 Impact Factor 0.592
2008 Impact Factor 0.722
2007 Impact Factor 0.833
2006 Impact Factor 0.638
2005 Impact Factor 0.736
2004 Impact Factor 0.754
2003 Impact Factor 0.66
2002 Impact Factor 0.743
2001 Impact Factor 0.763
2000 Impact Factor 0.651
1999 Impact Factor 1.096
1998 Impact Factor 0.739
1997 Impact Factor 0.81
1996 Impact Factor 1.159
1995 Impact Factor 0.798
1994 Impact Factor 0.867
1993 Impact Factor 0.633
1992 Impact Factor 0.694

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.54
Cited half-life >10.0
Immediacy index 0.29
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.18
Website Journal of Pulp and Paper Science website
Other titles Journal of pulp and paper science, Transactions of the Technical Section., JPPS, J.P.P.S
ISSN 0826-6220
OCLC 10670824
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Speed of paper machines is often limited by the drainage rate of the furnish and the mechanical properties of the wet web, i.e. the tension and relaxation properties. The conductivity of the water was adjusted to 1 mS/cm with CaCl2 and the pH was 6.5 in order to mimic conditions on a fine paper machine. Addition of a non-ionic surfactant at concentrations below critical micelle concentration (cmc) decreased dewatering time and increased dry content. Tensile strength and residual tension at 2% strain of the wet web increased until cmc, primarily due to the increased dry content after wet pressing. Density, air permeability and tensile strength increased for dry sheets. Lowering of pH from 6.5 to 5, decreased dry content after wet pressing and air permeability of dry sheets. Adjustment of conductivity with NaCl caused a decrease in both tensile strength and residual tension for wet sheets and increased dewatering time.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: In this experimental study, we relate refiner design and operation to pulp quality changes by low consistency refining. First, we demonstrate how refiner plate gap and specific energy are sufficient in predicting both pulp freeness and fibre length changes during refining. Second, we experimentally determine a predictive correlation for plate gap for the key operating and design variables. Finally, we demonstrate a correlation between freeness and fibre length to tensile and tear strength.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: A mechanistic mechanism for the consolidation of latex-pigment coatings, based on Lepoutre's coating consolidation and on Croll's latex film formation mechanisms, has been proposed by assuming the formation of a cake layer at the coating surface, and by introducing the concept of Latex Coalescence Concentration. The assumption of cake formation is consistent with the well-known phenomenon of skin formation observed during drying of latexes and of paper coatings. The new model also explains a common industry practice that the drying intensity at the middle drying stage after First Critical Concentration must be controlled, because boiling of free water in the coating under the skin may disturb the coating surface. It also predicts an observation in the literature that surface latex contents for thick coatings would be virtually independent of coating thickness, since the migration of latex particles mainly occurs in the liquid drying phase before skin formation, independent of coat weight.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: Methods combining micro scale resolution x-ray shadowgraphs, computerised x-ray micro-tomography and advanced image analysis were developed to study connections between the structure of void space and raw edge imbibition in liquid packaging board. Imbibition roughening was analyzed from 2D shadowgraphs by a dynamic interface recognition algorithm. An idea of investigating flow paths in cardboard samples using potassium iodine in water solution as contrast enhancement substance was introduced. For demonstrating the potential of the tomographic methods, numerical lattice Boltzmann permeability simulations were performed. Experimental measurements were conducted to compare and support the results extracted from tomographic data. A 3D void space segmentation algorithm was utilized to analyze structure of void space in tomographic reconstructions. Tentative results indicate that the new methods can be used to find correlation between pore size heterogeneity and imbibition roughening. Finally, water absorption coefficients of the test samples were calculated utilizing results extracted from the void space segmentation analysis.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: There is a lack of experimental data on the gas composition in recovery boiler furnaces, particularly in the lower furnace and at the black liquor spraying level. Experimental determination of the gas composition in full-scale furnaces is important for the understanding of the kinetics of the gasphase reactions and the formation of different intermediates in the combustion process. The gas composition was measured in the furnace of a large recovery boiler, using a new gas sampling method. The measurements were carried out from the primary air level to the upper tertiary air level. The measurements were a part of an extensive campaign planned and carried out to support validation of models based on Computational Fluid Dynamics. This paper will focus on the sulphur and nitrogen species measured in the furnace and on the developed gas sampling probe. A number of reactive sulphur and nitrogen intermediates were identified and quantified in the measurements. Especially high concentrations of different intermediates were measured at the black liquor spraying level. Measured nitrogen and sulphur species include: nitrogen monoxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen sulphide (H2S), sulphur dioxide (SO2), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), ethyl mercaptan (C2H5SH), dimethyl sulphide ((CH3)2S), dimethyl disulphide ((CH 3)2S2), carbonyl sulphide (COS), and carbon disulphide (CS2). Some of these have not been reported before in full-scale measurements.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: The physical location of flocculants and nanoparticles in laboratory prepared paper sheets was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) using fluorescently-tagged cationic polyacrylamide flocculant and fluorescently-tagged anionic colloidal borosilicate nanoparticles. Results suggest that flocculant did not coat individual fibres, but instead was associated with fibrils on the fibre surface and with deposited filler aggregates. Nanoparticles were found to be associated with the sites containing pre-adsorbed flocculant, and in the presence of starch, they were evenly distributed throughout the paper sheet. Semi-quantitative analysis of CLSM images of paper sheets was also performed. General guidelines for extracting quantitative information from images were established. Relative area covered by flocculant and nanoparticles was estimated and appeared to correlate with changes in retention aid doses.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: In industrial black liquor evaporation plants, large amounts of sodium crystals are produced every day which all have the potential to scale the evaporator surfaces. In this project, research on the crystallization during evaporation of softwood black liquor has been performed. The results are based on measurements in a research black liquor evaporator. The distribution of scale vertically along the heat transfer surface has been investigated, as well as the influence of different operating conditions, such as the circulating flow rate of black liquor (between 0.2 and 3.7 kg/ms), the residence time for the black liquor in the evaporator (between 76 and 226 s), and the temperature difference between the liquor and the heating steam (between 11 and 26 °C). The sodium scale formed during evaporation is mainly in the form of double salts of sodium carbonate and sodium sulfate. The ratio between the two salts is one important parameter affecting the crystallization and scaling. The effect of the carbonate-to-sulfate ratio has been investigated for aqueous sodium carbonate - sodium sulfate solutions. In this paper, the results of these investigations are presented and a number of industrial significances are illustrated.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: High-brightness high-yield pulp (HYP), also known as BCTMP, is a favourable substitute for hardwood bleached kraft pulp (HW BKP) in the production of printing and writing paper grades to benefit from the unique properties of HYP, such as high bulk and high light-scattering coefficient. However, in the production of high-brightness HYP, strong alkaline peroxide bleaching conditions are usually employed, causing a significant loss of bulk, light-scattering coefficient and yield of HYP. In this study, we compared the advantages of the combined peroxide/OBA brightening process (combining peroxide bleaching with the use of an optical brightening agent (OBA)), over the conventional peroxide bleaching process. The peroxide/OBA brightening process can produce aspen HYP with very high brightness (e.g., 90 % ISO), very high CIE whiteness and very low yellowness (b), which could not otherwise be obtained economically from the conventional peroxide bleaching process. For a given brightness target, the bulk and lightscattering coefficient of the bleached pulp from the combined peroxide/OBA brightening process were markedly higher than those from the conventional peroxide bleaching process. It was also found that substantially less dissolved organic matter (measured as COD) and anionic trash were formed in the combined peroxide/OBA brightening process in comparison with the conventional peroxide bleaching process, resulting in higher pulp yield.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: A modified hand sheet former was used to form fibre mats under applied vacuum comparable to that experienced in a suction box. The apparatus allowed for comparison of the effects of vacuum on filler distribution and migration. Hand sheets of 60 g/m2 final basis weight were formed using precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), clay, or a combination of PCC and clay fillers. The PCC filler concentration increased from the top side to the wire side until a plateau was reached in approximately the bottom quarter of the sheet. Applying a vacuum during the drainage process decreased the average PCC content with the majority of the reduction from the wire side of the sheet. In hand sheets formed with anionic clay the filler concentration increased from the top side past the sheet centre and then decreased towards the wire side, similar to the typical hand sheet distribution. Applying vacuum during forming had only a small effect on clay retention. Some sheets were formed with both filler types. In these experiments PCC was present in the lower half of the suspension and clay in the upper half, or else the PCC and clay were reversed. Filler from the suspension used to create the lower portion of the sheet showed a steady increase in concentration from the centre to the wire side. Filler from the suspension used to create the upper portion of the sheet showed a concentration increase from top side to centre, and then a decrease towards the wire side. These distributions showed that filler from the upper portion of the pulp suspension migrates through the sheet and is retained throughout.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: Reasons leading to the brightness ceiling in mechanical pulp peroxide bleaching were investigated with spruce thermomechanical pulp. During peroxide bleaching, new phenolic guaiacyl units, α-carbonyls and catechols were shown to be formed. All those are known precursors that can be converted to new coloured structures. High chemical charges, especially alkali, enhance formation of these precursors, and thereby limit brightness development. Contrary to the previously reported results on hardwood chemithermomechanical pulp, nitrogen pressurization had no beneficial effect on final brightness of spruce thermomechanical pulp, although it may slightly reduce formation of some colour precursors. The lower chromophore formation is probably obscured by the reduced lignin dissolution. During peroxide bleaching, naturally formed peracetic acid has no significant role in brightness development.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: Biopolymer nanoparticles form latex dispersions that consist of crosslinked water-swollen starch nanoparticles. The biobased latex emulsion provides an alternative binder system to petrochemical-based binders used by coated paper and paperboard manufacturers. The biolatex binders consist of a re-engineered starch biopolymer that is unique because its discrete particles are not water soluble, but form a colloid dispersion in water. The swelling characteristics of a typical SB latex and biolatex colloids were studied and compared. The crosslinked structure and the role of water as a fugitive plasticizer for the biolatex nanoparticles explain the unique performance both in terms of coater runnability and optical properties of the coated paper. Novel titanium dioxide-biolatex conjugate compositions were produced by incorporating titanium dioxide particles into the reactive extrusion process used to prepare biopolymer nanoparticles. Increased whiteness and brightness were observed for paper coatings containing the titanium dioxidebiolatex conjugate compositions. Nanoparticle tracking analysis provided evidence for conjugate formation. The spacing created between TiO2 particles of biobased nanoparticle-TiO2 conjugates is believed to be responsible for the enhanced whiteness and brightness performance.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: Fractionation and the alkaline peroxide treatment (APT) of rejects were used to produce pulps for value-added grades using TMP from the latency tank of a newsprint mill. Hydrocyclones were able to selectively fractionate and remove undeveloped fibres from a blend of long, medium, and short fibres. Savings of 18 % in reject refining specific energy were achieved when hydrocyclone rejects were treated with alkaline peroxide before refining. When newsprint TMP was processed in the hydrocyclone fractionation system followed by APT and reject refining, the treated pulp was suitable for making a lightweight coated (LWC) grade with substantially less reinforcing chemical pulp. The overall specific energy consumption was also ~15 % less than that of a typical commercial TMP for LWC grades. With the implementation of technologies involving fractionation and the alkaline peroxide treatment of rejects, an existing newsprint refining installation could be maintained and used to produce pulp for value-added grades with minimal capital investment.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: Black spruce (Picea mariana) thermomechanical pulp, produced with an acid hydrogen peroxide inter-stage treatment that significantly lowers the refining energy demand, was evaluated with respect to changes in fibre morphology and chemical composition. The hydrogen peroxide was used under Fenton conditions, i.e., under acid conditions and with ferrous iron present. No major differences between the reference pulp and the chemically treated pulps were found with respect to fibre length, width or cross-sectional dimensions. However, the acid hydrogen peroxide-treated pulps tend to have more collapsed fibres, higher flexibility, larger specific surface area and a lower coarseness value. A thorough chemical characterisation of the washed pulps and their effluents shows that the yield loss accompanying the treatment was mainly a consequence of hemicelluloses dissolving.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science
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    ABSTRACT: As part of a program to reduce electrical energy consumption in the refining process, the effects of alkaline peroxide treatments on second stage themomechanical pulp properties before and after low consistency refining have been investigated. The low consistency refining stage was simulated using a Waring Blendor. Highly alkaline peroxide treatments resulted in gains in pulp properties that would allow reduced energy in-put in second-stage refining. The treated pulp was more flexible and more resistant to cutting during subsequent low consistency refining. The improved properties resulted mainly from production of acid groups on the fibre surface or in the fines.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Pulp and Paper Science