Annals of Medicine (ANN MED)

Publisher: Suomalainen lääkäriseura Duodecim, Informa Healthcare

Journal description

Annals of Medicine is an international, peer-reviewed review journal bridging molecular medicine and clinical practice. It provides current opinions on a wide range of medical specialties focusing on internal medicine. This unique resource enables readers to keep up-to-date with the latest advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of diseases and how molecular medicine can impact on daily clinical practice. The series on Trends in Clinical Practice and Trends in Molecular Medicine are published regularly. Special Sections feature commissioned, peer-reviewed papers on different aspects of a theme, which in 2001 will include tumorigenesis, obesity, angiogenesis and depression. A new series on the very latest advances in molecular medicine will start with molecular cardiology and molecular endocrinology. Annals of Medicine has an impact factor of 2.566 and is ranked 12/110 in the world in the category of Medicine, General and Internal. This journal is published for The Finnish Medical Society Duodecim.

Current impact factor: 3.89

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 3.886
2013 Impact Factor 4.733
2012 Impact Factor 5.094
2011 Impact Factor 3.516
2010 Impact Factor 4.323
2009 Impact Factor 4.246
2008 Impact Factor 5.435
2007 Impact Factor 5.779
2006 Impact Factor 4.594
2005 Impact Factor 3.848
2004 Impact Factor 3.617
2003 Impact Factor 3.614
2002 Impact Factor 3.422
2001 Impact Factor 2.818
2000 Impact Factor 2.794
1999 Impact Factor 2.566
1998 Impact Factor 1.9
1997 Impact Factor 2.104
1996 Impact Factor 1.716
1995 Impact Factor 1.84
1994 Impact Factor 1.129
1993 Impact Factor 1.401
1992 Impact Factor 1

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 4.17
Cited half-life 8.00
Immediacy index 0.69
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 1.45
Website Annals of Medicine website
Other titles Annals of medicine (Helsinki, Finland), Annals of medicine, Ann med
ISSN 0785-3890
OCLC 19550892
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Informa Healthcare

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website or institution website
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Non-commercial
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • NIH funded authors may post articles to PubMed Central for release 12 months after publication
    • Wellcome Trust authors may deposit in Europe PMC after 6 months
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective Prenatal genetic analysis in primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) can decrease morbidity and mortality. Methods We compared the postnatal prognoses of index cases and their subsequent sibling-fetuses using prenatal genetic analysis. Results From 2007 to 2014, 14 sibling-fetuses receiving a prenatal diagnosis born to four mothers with WAS, three with X-CGD, and one each with IPEX, XLA and severe combined immunodeficiency [RAG2-SCID] were recruited. There were six affected, two carriers, and six wild types. Among the six affected, four [3X-CGD and 1RAG2-SCID] were terminated and two [1WAS and 1X-CGD] with early prophylactics underwent successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) without infection. In the 12 index cases with a postnatal diagnosis, eight died (five due to infections and one each due to refractory bleeding, severe diarrhea, and post-transplant pneumothorax), two X-CGD underwent reconstituted HSCT after recurrent life-threatening infections, one WAS developed malignancy, and another WAS developed autoimmune disorders despite the administration of prophylactics and regular immunoglobulin infusion. Conclusion Instead of recurrent life-threatening infections leading to mortality in the postnatal diagnosis group, the severe PIDs who received early prophylactics were cured by HSCT, and all of mortality were terminations in the prenatal diagnosis group. Further large-scale studies are needed to validate this beneficial effect. Key message Prenatal genetic analysis in fetuses born to PIDs carrier mothers allows for the affected fetuses to receive optimal management including prophylactics against infections and HSCT if indicated. Patients with PIDs diagnosed postnatally who are prone to severe infections have higher rates of morbidity and mortality than their subsequent siblings who have a prenatal genetic diagnosis.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Metabolomics is a promising approach for the identification of chemical compounds that serve for early detection, diagnosis, prediction of therapeutic response and prognosis of disease. Moreover, metabolomics has shown to increase the diagnostic threshold and prediction of type 2 diabetes. Evidence suggests that branched-chain amino acids, acylcarnitines and aromatic amino acids may play an early role on insulin resistance, exposing defects on amino acid metabolism, β-oxidation, and tricarboxylic acid cycle. This review aims to provide a panoramic view of the metabolic shifts that antecede or follow type 2 diabetes.Key messagesBCAAs, AAAs and acylcarnitines are strongly associated with early insulin resistance.Diabetes risk prediction has been improved when adding metabolomic markers of dysglycemia to standard clinical and biochemical factors.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Aim To investigate the association between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and coronary collateral circulation (CCC) in Chinese patients with angiography-proven ≥95% coronary stenosis.Methods In this study, 1158 patients with angiography-proven ≥95% occlusion in ≥1 major epicardial coronary artery were enrolled, and then classified into two groups: poor CCC (Rentrop grades 0–1) and good CCC (Rentrop grades 2–3). CRP levels were grouped using the following two models: Model 1 discretized CRP group with 33.33% and 66.66% as the critical values and Model 2 with 1.0 and 3.0 mg/L as the cut off values.Results There were significant differences in serum CRP levels between the two groups (5.76 ± 3.45 vs. 3.49 ± 2.44 mg/L, respectively; p < 0.001), and compared with the first CRP tertile, the risks of poor CCC were higher in the second and third CRP tertiles (OR 2.31, 95%CI [1.67–3.19], OR 6.25, 95%CI [4.52–8.62], respectively). The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the optimal cutoff value of CRP to predict poor CCC was 4.21 mg/L with 59.6% sensitivity and 74.33% specificity.Conclusions CRP levels are an independent predictor for poor CCC and might supply a useful biomarker in clinical applications.Key messagesC-reactive protein (CRP) is a non-specific inflammatory marker that is regarded as an independent risk and prognostic factor for individuals who suffer from coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiovascular disorders.In a Chinese cohort of patients with coronary artery occlusion or stenosis of ≥95% TIMI grade 1 anterograde-flow, the relationship between CRP concentrations and angiographically visible coronary collateral (CC) was assessed.Our data indicated that elevated CRP associated with a significant impairment in CC development, and might supply a useful biomarker in clinical applications.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: One in three obese adults is classified as metabolically healthy, but there is less evidence in obese children. We studied the overall clinical presentation of Finnish obese children and the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors with child-specific cut-offs. Material and methods: This is a cross-sectional register-based study of 2-18-year-old children (n = 900) evaluated for obesity in three hospitals in 2005-2012. Clinical and metabolic data were related to sex, age, puberty, and obesity grade and analyzed using chi-square and non-parametric tests. Results: In 80% of cases at least one cardiovascular risk factor was present. Only 3% of subjects for whom complete metabolic data were available (n = 360) had no metabolic disorder. Systolic blood pressure was hypertensive in 50.2% and diastolic in 14.5% of the children. The youngest children had highest body mass index SD score. Obesity was more severe in boys than girls (p < 0.001). Hypertensive systolic blood pressure values (p = 0.012), prediabetes (p < 0.001), fatty liver (p < 0.001), and dyslipidemia (p = 0.025) were more prevalent in 15-18-year-old boys than girls. Conclusion: Most obese children in specialist care have cardiovascular risk factors; this indicates that earlier intervention is needed. Key messages Most obese children evaluated in specialist care have one or more cardiovascular risk factors, and very few have no metabolic disturbances. In late adolescence these risk factors are more common in obese boys than girls. Primary care personnel are less likely to intervene in cases of obesity in young children than in adolescents, leading to a delay in treatment. Hypertensive blood pressure values require more attention in clinical work.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The diagnosis and treatment of neurosarcoidosis can be very challenging for several reasons. It affects clinically 5%–10% of sarcoidosis patients, but can be found in up to 25% of autopsies. These data reveal that a high percentage of asymptomatic or misdiagnosed cases can be missed at an initial diagnostic approach. Clinical and imaging findings are often non-specific since they can be found in a large number of neurological disorders. Histopathology can also be confounding if not performed by an expert pathologist and not placed in an appropriate clinical context. In this review, we discuss clinical features, laboratory findings, imaging, and histology of neurosarcoidosis, and we report current evidence regarding drug therapy. We conclude that a correct diagnostic approach should include a multidisciplinary evaluation involving clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists and that future studies should evaluate the genetic signature of neurosarcoidosis as they could be helpful in the assessment of this uncommon disease. With head-to-head comparisons of medical treatment for neurosarcoidosis still lacking due to the rarity of the disease and an increasing number of immunomodulating therapies at hand, novel therapeutic approaches are to be expected within the next few years.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: To evaluate if pulse pressure (PP) is a risk predictor for atrial fibrillation (AF) in a longitudinal study of 60-year-old men and women from Stockholm (n = 4,232), free from AF at baseline, with primary end-point incident AF. Methods: AF diagnoses were obtained from the national hospital discharge register. The estimated risk of AF associated with increasing PP values was calculated according to PP values above median (>52.5 mmHg) and according to 1-SD increase (14 mmHg) in PP, using a crude and an adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results: During a mean follow-up of 13.6 years, 286 incident AF cases were recorded. The number of AF cases increased significantly with increasing PP quartile in men but not in women. PP values above median were associated with increased AF risk (crude HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.28-2.06; p < 0.001), but risk estimates were attenuated after adjustment for common AF risk factors. When PP was entered in the Cox regression model as a continuous variable, the risk of AF did not change by 1-SD PP increase (adjusted HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.91-1.20; p = 0.560). Conclusions: PP seems not to be associated with incident AF in a Swedish population of 60-year-old men and women. Key messages Atrial fibrillation is a highly prevalent disease with a partly unknown etiology. A better knowledge of the risk factors associated with the risk of atrial fibrillation may improve primary prevention strategies. Our results indicate that pulse pressure is not an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Annals of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The diagnosis and treatment of neurosarcoidosis can be very challenging for several reasons. It affects clinically 5%–10% of sarcoidosis patients, but can be found in up to 25% of autopsies. These data reveal that a high percentage of asymptomatic or misdiagnosed cases can be missed at an initial diagnostic approach. Clinical and imaging findings are often non-specific since they can be found in a large number of neurological disorders. Histopathology can also be confounding if not performed by an expert pathologist and not placed in an appropriate clinical context. In this review, we discuss clinical features, laboratory findings, imaging, and histology of neurosarcoidosis, and we report current evidence regarding drug therapy. We conclude that a correct diagnostic approach should include a multidisciplinary evaluation involving clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists and that future studies should evaluate the genetic signature of neurosarcoidosis as they could be helpful in the assessment of this uncommon disease. With head-to-head comparisons of medical treatment for neurosarcoidosis still lacking due to the rarity of the disease and an increasing number of immunomodulating therapies at hand, novel therapeutic approaches are to be expected within the next few years.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Studies about work stress and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) have yielded inconsistent results. This meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between job strain and the risk of CHD.Methods. We searched PubMed and Embase databases for studies reporting data on job strain and the risk of CHD. Studies were included if they reported multiple-adjusted relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) with respect to CHD from job strain.Results. Fourteen prospective cohort studies comprising 232,767 participants were included. The risk of CHD was increased in high-strain (RR 1.26; 95% CI 1.12-1.41) and passive jobs (RR 1.14; 95% CI 1.02-1.29) but not in active jobs (RR 1.09; 95% CI 0.97-1.22), when compared with low-strain group. The increased risk of CHD in high-strain and passive jobs was mainly driven by studies with a follow-up duration of ≥ 10 years. Neither the low-control (RR 1.06; 95% CI 0.93-1.19) nor high-demand (RR 1.13; 95% CI 0.97-1.32) dimension was independently associated with the risk of CHD.Conclusions. Individuals with high-strain and passive jobs were more likely to experience a CHD event. Intervention programs incorporating individual and organizational levels are crucial for reducing job strain and the risk of CHD.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: A close relationship between cancer and thrombosis does exist, documented by the fact that an overall 7-fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been reported in patients with malignancy compared to non-malignancy. The potential impact of antithrombotic agents in cancer-associated VTE has long been recognized, and, in particular, several clinical trials in the last 20 years have reported the safety and efficacy of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) for treatment and prophylaxis of VTE in patients with various types of cancer. More recently, a number of preclinical and clinical studies have suggested that LMWHs may improve survival in cancer patients with mechanisms that are different from its antithrombotic effect but are linked to the ability of influencing directly the tumor biology. This paper reviews the evidence around the potential survival benefits of LMWHs by analyzing the suggested mechanisms and the available clinical data.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: There is increasing knowledge that patients can be predisposed to a certain disease by genetic variations in their DNA. Extensive genetic variation has been described in molecules involved in short- and long-term complications after lung transplantation (LTx), such as primary graft dysfunction (PGD), acute rejection, respiratory infection, chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), and mortality. Several of these studies could not be confirmed or were not reproduced in other cohorts. However, large multicenter prospective studies need to be performed to define the real clinical consequence and significance of genotyping the donor and receptor of a LTx. The current review presents an overview of genetic polymorphisms (SNP) investigating an association with different complications after LTx. Finally, the major drawbacks, clinical relevance, and future perspectives will be discussed.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Short-term weight loss is often successful, but the obtained results are difficult to maintain. Therefore, a study focusing on obese people who successfully lost weight, with special emphasis upon methods applied and background factors, is of major importance. Methods/subjects: This study was based upon a web-based questionnaire, which the participants filled in after registration. Altogether 316 people were recruited through articles in newspapers all over Finland, and of them 184 met the inclusion criteria: age 18-60 years, body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m(2) before weight loss, a weight loss of at least 10%, and maintaining it for a minimum of 2 years. Results: A total of 158 participants (100 women and 58 men) were included in the final analyses. The mean age was 44.5 years, average BMI before weight loss 35.9 kg/m(2) and after weight loss 26.1 kg/m(2), average weight loss was 26.5% or 32.4 kg. Compared with the general Finnish population the participants smoked less (P = 0.009), used less alcohol (P ≤ 0.001), and were physically more active (P ≤ 0.001). Conclusions: People who were successful in long-term weight loss have a much healthier lifestyle than the general Finnish population. Increased physical activity seems to be a major determinant of successful long-term results.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate the predictive value of T-wave inversion (TWI) on routine electrocardiogram (ECG) for mortality in the general population with various risk groups in a prospective population-based follow-up study. Subjects. ECGs of a random population-based sample of 1814 men aged 42-60 years without coronary heart disease (CHD) at baseline. Results: During an average follow-up of 21 years, 685 deaths occurred. Of these deaths 174 were due to CHD and 278 to cardiovascular disease (CVD). There were 57 subjects with TWI. After adjusting for age, TWI was associated with an increased CHD mortality (relative risk (RR) 4.10, 95% CI 2.26-7.41), CVD mortality (RR 3.47, 95% CI 2.09-5.78), and all-cause mortality (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.37-3.12). After further adjustment for conventional risk factors, TWI remained statistically significant, predicting CHD mortality (RR 2.62, 95% CI 1.57-4.36), CVD mortality (RR 2.18, 95% CI 1.40-3.38), and all-cause mortality (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.00-2.01), respectively. Conclusion: TWI is a strong predictor for CHD, CVD, and all-cause mortality in the general population. The respective risks of CHD and CVD among men with TWI were also increased among men with high blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and obesity.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Annals of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), a systemic inflammatory disorder, is often considered a part of the spectrum of the better-known systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, with later age onset. The diagnosis is primarily clinical and necessitates the exclusion of a wide range of mimicking disorders. AOSD is a heterogeneous entity, usually presenting with high fever, arthralgia, skin rash, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly accompanied by systemic manifestations. The diagnosis is clinical and empirical, where patients are required to meet inclusion and exclusion criteria with negative immunoserological results. There are no clear-cut diagnostic radiological or laboratory signs. Complications of AOSD include transient pulmonary hypertension, macrophage activation syndrome, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and amyloidosis. Common laboratory abnormalities include neutrophilic leukocytosis, abnormal liver function tests, and elevated acute-phase reactants (ESR, CRP, ferritin). Treatment consists of anti-inflammatory medications. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have limited efficacy, and corticosteroid therapy and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are usually required. Recent advances have revealed a pivotal role of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-18 in disease pathogenesis, giving rise to the development of novel targeted therapies aiming at optimal disease control. The review aims to summarize recent advances in pathophysiology and potential therapeutic strategies in AOSD.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Annals of Medicine