American Journal of Preventive Medicine (AM J PREV MED)

Publisher: American College of Preventive Medicine; Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine, Elsevier Masson

Journal description

The American Journal of Preventive Medicine is the official journal of the American College of Preventive Medicine and the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine. It publishes articles in the areas of prevention research, teaching, practice and policy. Original research is published on interventions aimed at the prevention of chronic and acute disease and the promotion of individual and community health. Of particular emphasis are papers that address the primary and secondary prevention of important clinical, behavioral and public health issues such as injury and violence, infectious disease, women's health, smoking, sedentary behaviors and physical activity, nutrition, diabetes, obesity, and alcohol and drug abuse. Papers also address educational initiatives aimed at improving the ability of health professionals to provide effective clinical prevention and public health services. Papers on health services research pertinent to prevention and public health are also published. The journal also publishes official policy statements from the two co-sponsoring organizations, review articles, media reviews, and editorials. Finally, the journal periodically publishes supplements and special theme issues devoted to areas of current interest to the prevention community. For information on the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) and the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine (ATPM), visit their web sites at the following URLs: http://www.acpm.org and http://www.atpm.org/.

Current impact factor: 4.53

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 4.527
2013 Impact Factor 4.281
2012 Impact Factor 3.945
2011 Impact Factor 4.044
2010 Impact Factor 4.11
2009 Impact Factor 4.235
2008 Impact Factor 3.766
2007 Impact Factor 3.489
2006 Impact Factor 3.497
2005 Impact Factor 3.167
2004 Impact Factor 3.188
2003 Impact Factor 3.256
2002 Impact Factor 2.63
2001 Impact Factor 2.064
2000 Impact Factor 2.192
1999 Impact Factor 1.442
1998 Impact Factor 1.199
1997 Impact Factor 0.995
1996 Impact Factor 0.829
1995 Impact Factor 0.856
1994 Impact Factor 0.617
1993 Impact Factor 0.549
1992 Impact Factor 0.646

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 5.40
Cited half-life 6.70
Immediacy index 1.14
Eigenfactor 0.04
Article influence 2.12
Website American Journal of Preventive Medicine website
Other titles American journal of preventive medicine
ISSN 0749-3797
OCLC 11120856
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier Masson

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Author's post-print may be used to update arXiv and RepEC
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
    • Publisher last reviewed on 01/05/2015
    • 'Elsevier Masson' is an imprint of 'Elsevier'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Breast cancer affects women's health-related quality of life negatively, but little is known about how breast cancer affects this in younger women aged 18-44 years. This study measures preference-based health state utility (HSU) values, a scaled index of health-related quality of life for economic evaluation, for younger women with breast cancer and compares these values with same-age women with other cancers and older women (aged >= 45 years) with breast cancer. Methods: Data from the 2009 and 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed in 2014. The sample included 218,852 women; 7,433 and 18,577 had histories of breast and other cancers. HSU values were estimated using Healthy Days survey questions and a published mapping algorithm. Linear regression models for HSU were estimated by age group (18-44 and >= 45 years). Results: The adjusted breast cancer HSU impact was four times larger for younger women than for older women (-0.097 vs -0.024, p<0.001). For younger women, the effect of breast cancer on HSU was 70% larger than that of other cancers (-0.097 vs -0.057, p = 0.024). Conclusions: Younger breast cancer survivors reported lower HSU values than older survivors, highlighting the impact of breast cancer on the physical and mental health of younger women. The estimates may be used to evaluate quality-adjusted life-years or expectancy for prevention or treatment of breast cancer. This study also indicates that separate quality of life adjustments for women by age group are important for economic analysis of public health breast cancer interventions.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: A few studies have examined the costs of breast cancer treatment in a Medicaid population at the state level. However, no study has estimated medical costs for breast cancer treatment at the national level for women aged 19-44 years enrolled in Medicaid. Methods: A sample of 5,542 younger women aged 19-44 years enrolled in fee-for-service Medicaid with diagnosis codes for breast cancer in 2007 were compared with 4.3 million women aged 19-44 years enrolled in fee-for-service Medicaid without breast cancer. Nonlinear regression methods estimated prevalent treatment costs for younger women with breast cancer compared with those without breast cancer. Individual medical costs were estimated by race/ethnicity and by type of services. Analyses were conducted in 2013 and all medical treatment costs were adjusted to 2012 U.S. dollars. Results: The estimated monthly direct medical costs for breast cancer treatment among younger women enrolled in Medicaid was $5,711 (95% CI = $5,039, $6,383) per woman. The estimated monthly cost for outpatient services was $4,058 (95% CI = $3,575, $4,541), for inpatient services was $1,003 (95% CI = $708, $1,298), and for prescription drugs was $539 (95% CI = $431, $647). By race/ethnicity, non-Hispanic white women had the highest monthly total medical costs, followed by Hispanic women and non-Hispanic women of other race. Conclusions: Cost estimates demonstrate the substantial medical costs associated with breast cancer treatment for younger Medicaid beneficiaries. As the Medicaid program continues to evolve, the treatment cost estimates could serve as important inputs in decision making regarding planning for treatment of invasive breast cancer in this population. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of American Journal of Preventive Medicine
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: No study has quantified productivity losses associated with breast cancer in younger women aged 18-44 years. This study estimated productivity costs, including work and home productivity losses, among younger women who reported ever receiving a breast cancer diagnosis. Methods: A two-part regression model and 2000-2010 National Health Interview Survey data were used to estimate the number of work and home productivity days missed because of breast cancer, adjusted for socioeconomic characteristics and comorbidities. Estimates for younger women were compared with those for women aged 45-64 years. Data were analyzed in 2013-2014. Results: Per capita, younger women with breast cancer had annual losses of $2,293 (95% CI = $1,069, $3,518) from missed work and $442 (95% CI = $161, $723) from missed home productivity. Total annual breast cancer-associated productivity costs for younger women were $344 million (95% CI = $154 million, $535 million). Older women with breast cancer had lower per capita work loss productivity costs of $1,407 (95% CI = $899, $1,915) but higher total work loss productivity costs estimated at $1,072 million (95% CI = $685 million, $1,460 million) than younger women. Conclusions: Younger women with a history of breast cancer face a disproportionate share of work and home productivity losses. Although older women have lower per capita costs, total productivity costs were higher for older women because the number of older women with breast cancer is higher. The results underscore the importance of continued efforts by the public health community to promote and support the unique needs of younger breast cancer survivors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of American Journal of Preventive Medicine
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Breast cancer in women aged 18-44 years accounts for approximately 27,000 newly diagnosed cases and 3,000 deaths annually. When tumors are diagnosed, they are usually aggressive, resulting in expensive treatment costs. The purpose of this study is to estimate the prevalent medical costs attributable to breast cancer treatment among privately insured younger women. Methods: Data from the 2006 MarketScan (R) database representing claims for privately insured younger women were used. Costs for younger breast cancer patients were compared with a matched sample of younger women without breast cancer, overall and for an active treatment subsample. Analyses were conducted in 2013 with medical care costs expressed in 2012 U.S. dollars. Results: Younger women with breast cancer incurred an estimated $19,435 (SE = $415) in additional direct medical care costs per person per year compared with younger women without breast cancer. Outpatient expenditures comprised 94% of the total estimated costs ($18,344 [SE = $396]). Inpatient costs were $43 (SE = $10) higher and prescription drug costs were $1,048 (SE = $64) higher for younger women with breast cancer than in younger women without breast cancer. For women in active treatment, the burden was more than twice as high ($52,542 [SE = $977]). Conclusions: These estimates suggest that breast cancer is a costly illness to treat among younger, privately insured women. This underscores the potential financial vulnerability of women in this age group and the importance of health insurance during this time in life.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Long-term objectives associated with cancer survivors have been suggested by Healthy People 2020, including increasing the proportion of survivors living beyond 5 years after diagnosis and improving survivors’ mental and physical health-related quality of life. Prior to reaching these objectives, several intermediate steps must be taken to improve the physical, social, emotional, and financial well-being of cancer survivors. Public health has a role in developing strategic, actionable, and measurable approaches to facilitate change at multiple levels to improve the lives of survivors and their families. The social ecological model has been used by the public health community as the foundation of multilevel intervention design and implementation, encouraging researchers and practitioners to explore methods that promote internal and external changes at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and policy levels. The survivorship community, including public health professionals, providers, policymakers, survivors, advocates, and caregivers, must work collaboratively to identify, develop, and implement interventions that benefit cancer survivors. The National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship highlights public health domains and associated strategies that can be the impetus for collaboration between and among the levels in the social ecological model and are integral to improving survivor outcomes. This paper describes the Public Health Action Model for Cancer Survivorship, an integrative framework that combines the National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship with the social ecological model to demonstrate how interaction among the various levels may promote better outcomes for survivors.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) can provide insights into cancer survivors' physical and mental functioning, their social relationships, and perceptions of their health and well-being. Understanding factors associated with HRQOL may help identify those who are at greater risk for diminished functioning and improve targeted delivery of health promotion programs. This analysis sought to assess sociodemographic and medical factors associated with HRQOL among colorectal cancer survivors and factors that may put survivors at risk for poor functioning. In addition, associations between BMI and physical activity and HRQOL were explored. Methods: Data from a cross-sectional study of health behaviors among 593 long-term colorectal cancer survivors recruited through the California Cancer Registry in early 2010 were analyzed in late 2014 to early 2015. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with physical, mental, and overall HRQOL. Results: The mean physical and mental HRQOL scores of survivors were 46.88 and 42.28, respectively, and lower than the population norm (50). Being older, having more comorbid conditions, and having had a recurrence were associated with lower physical and overall HRQOL, whereas being physically active was associated with higher physical and overall HRQOL. Conclusions: Findings highlight the need to encourage healthcare providers to promote physical activity among sedentary cancer survivors, even at modest levels. In addition, lower mental HRQOL scores may indicate a greater need to screen cancer survivors for psychosocial issues and link them with appropriate services.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: One of six priorities of CDC's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is to address the needs of cancer survivors within the local population served by individually funded states, tribes, and territories. This report examines cancer survivorship activities implemented in five NCCCP grantees, which have initiated evidence-based activities outlined in A National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship: Advancing Public Health Strategies (NAP). Methods: NCCCP action plans, submitted annually to CDC, from 2010 to 2014 were reviewed in February 2015 to assess implementation of cancer survivorship activities and recommended strategies consistent with the NAP. Four state-level and one tribal grantee with specific activities related to one of each of the four NAP strategies were chosen for inclusion. Brief case reports describing the initiation and impact of implemented activities were developed in collaboration with each grantee program director. Results: New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa programs each implemented activities in surveillance and applied research; communication, education, and training; programs, policies, and infrastructure; and access to quality care and services. Conclusions: This report provides examples for incorporating cancer survivorship activities within Comprehensive Cancer Control programs of various sizes, demographic makeup, and resource capacity. New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band developed creative cancer survivorship activities that meet CDC recommendations. NCCCP grantees can follow these examples by implementing evidence-based survivorship interventions that meet the needs of their specific populations.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer survivors, the medical community, public health professionals, researchers, and policymakers all need information about newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths to better understand and address the disease burden. CDC collects cancer data on 96% of the U.S. population through the National Program of Cancer Registries. The National Program of Cancer Registries routinely collects data on all cancer occurrences, deaths, and the types of initial treatment received by the patients, and recently CDC has made advances in its cancer surveillance activities that have direct applicability to cancer survivorship research and care. This article examines CDC’s innovative uses of the National Program of Cancer Registries infrastructure and data as a recruitment source for survivorship research studies and behavioral interventions; comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research; and the collection, consolidation, and dissemination of treatment summaries for cancer survivors and their providers. This paper also discusses long-term, idealistic plans for additional data linkages and sharing among public health, providers, and the cancer survivor through innovative concepts such as patient portals and rapid-learning health care.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines among children in the U.S. since 2000 has dramatically reduced pneumococcal disease burden among adults. Significant vaccine-preventable morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal infections still remains, especially among older adults. The U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recently recommended the routine use of both pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide vaccines (PPSV23) for adults >= 65 years. These recommendations were based on the remaining burden of illness among adults and the importance of non-bacteremic pneumonia prevention in light of new evidence confirming the efficacy of PCV13 to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia among older adults. This paper reviews the evidence that led ACIP to make recommendations for PCV13 and PPSV23 use among adults, and highlights potential gaps to be addressed by future studies to inform adult vaccination policy. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumonia should be closely monitored to evaluate the effectiveness and continued utility of the current vaccination strategy, and to identify future directions for pneumococcal disease prevention among older adults.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · American Journal of Preventive Medicine