Journal of Rural Studies (J RURAL STUD)

Publisher: Elsevier

Journal description

International and interdisciplinary in scope, the Journal of Rural Studies publishes research articles relating to such rural issues as society, demography, housing, employment, transport, services, land-use, recreation, agriculture and conservation. The journal focuses on those areas encompassing extensive land-use, with small-scale and diffuse settlement patterns and communities linked into the surrounding landscape and milieux.

Current impact factor: 2.04

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 2.348

Additional details

5-year impact 2.44
Cited half-life 8.40
Immediacy index 0.24
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.80
Website Journal of Rural Studies website
Other titles Journal of rural studies
ISSN 0743-0167
OCLC 10490841
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Author's post-print may be used to update arXiv and RepEC
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Questions regarding the relevance of culture-based development strategies are even more relevant to ask when such strategies are applied to rural places and small towns. In urban contexts, the number of citizens and the volume and variety of the cultural sector, other industries and services are important success criteria. In small Norwegian rural municipalities, these factors are even more critical because the Norwegian rural context is characterized by low population density and low variety and volume in industries and services. Rural places and small towns are, to a large extent, neglected in the culture-led development studies, and likewise, culture is largely neglected in rural development studies. A degree of attention is given to the increasing commodification of rural places and the economic sustainability and cultural influence of cultural and creative industries in rural areas but less to the construction of cultural development policies. In this study, the emergence of cultural policy and culture-led strategies in four small rural communities in southern Norway is analyzed in a topological perspective on mobility, scale and the significance of local history and embeddedness. The primary findings are that although policy construction is influenced by the flow of neo-liberal consumer-based cultural policies, it appears that the cultural policies of small rural communities are more embedded in heritage and tradition based on ideas of participation, mobilization and social coherence.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: Governance and social capital are significant components in the management and operation of agricultural value chains. We explore these related concepts by examining the regulator (COCOBOD) farmer dyad within the (Ghanaian) cocoa value chain, using unique survey and interview data from 300 Ghanaian cocoa farmers. Utilising this data, we construct multi-scalar and multi-dimensional measures of both governance and social capital, before exploring this dyad using multivariate analysis. Alongside our interview data, our results confirm a positive relationship existing between perceptions of good governance and social capital, although governance perceptions differ across the different cocoa growing regions. Our results point towards industry bodies as conduits for facilitating wider stakeholder participation, enhancing social capital and shared values, and fostering consensus within (agricultural) value chains and socio-economic development.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: This paper uses ordered logit models to test for evidence of systematically higher levels of subjective wellbeing in rural Scotland, differentiating between remote rural and accessible rural areas. Data are drawn from the 2008/9 wave of the BHPS covering a sample of almost 2150 Scottish residents. Two alternative quantitative measures of subjective wellbeing are used in the analysis, one based on life satisfaction, the other on mental wellbeing. The results find statistically significant evidence of higher life satisfaction in remote (but not accessible) rural Scotland after having controlled for the individual characteristics of respondents. In contrast, the mental wellbeing measure is not found to vary across rural-urban space. The paper concludes by suggesting several areas for further analysis emphasising how such research could support Scottish Government policy.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: This article analyzes the potential of learning processes to promote governance and economic development in rural areas. It examines how three types of learning in the Lurín River Basin in Peru —-technical expertise, storytelling, and experiential knowledge – combine to empower rural communities to act collectively. Based on an analysis of three community-led economic development processes—-irrigation improvements, tourism and food processing—-we show that learning can result in new, albeit fragile, forms of governance and social capital. Fragile governance can turn into regional economic development when learning results in the development of a regional narrative and coordination occurs across both vertical and horizontal network dimensions.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: To pursue development goals, policymakers and scholars alike have proposed that actors in rural areas may usefully engage in collective actions, e.g. by forming community groups, producer associations or multi-actor networks. One proposed benefit of such collaborations is the enhanced knowledge exchange and learning which may be created, and in the literature the dynamics of this are often explained via the concepts of embeddedness and/or social capital. To date however, studies tend towards a somewhat narrow, territorial, interpretation of these concepts, with the result that current understanding of how collaborations and learning evolve between rural actors is rather constrained. This paper aims to explore a broader interpretation of these concepts, through case analysis of a producer cooperative in the Scottish shellfish sector. In the case, the realities of member and management relations are revealed, along with the types of knowledge generated and the processes by which these are, or are not, shared between actors. In terms of embeddedness, our analysis reveals that, rather than the local community context which tends to dominate the literature, it is sectoral norms and habits which shape actor relations and learning most significantly in this case. In terms of social capital, we identify that tension-fuelled social relations are not in themselves a barrier to collaboration, again in contrast to existing claims, particularly where key actors have appropriate interpersonal skills, and where a values-based mindset (‘cooperative know-how’) is held in common. The findings therefore challenge popular assumptions about how embeddedness and social capital shape collective action and learning in rural areas, and illustrate the value of interpreting these concepts more expansively.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: In light of the global, unprecedented and enduring phenomenon of population ageing, cities and communities across the world have committed themselves to establishing and implementing age friendly community designs, programs, services and practices. In Canada, there has been a particular interest in promoting ‘age friendliness’ in rural and remote communities where there is often a concentration of older residents and limited access to services and supports. Our study examines the connection between social and place vulnerability and the development of ‘age friendly’ communities in one Canadian province, Nova Scotia—a province that is at the forefront of the aging trend. Specifically, we look at how infrastructure and assets important to vulnerable seniors in rural communities may be affected by coastal climate change and consider how communities can better plan for such eventualities. This work highlights the importance of linking age friendly community initiatives to proactive planning practices. Substantively, we demonstrate the lack of attention to place vulnerability within the age-friendly communities framework.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: Family farms play an important role in the European countryside, yet their number is steadily declining. This raises the question of what conveys resilience to family farms, i.e. the ability to persist over the long-term through buffering shocks and adapting to change. Within the current approaches to farm resilience, we distinguish between two perspectives: the first focuses on material structures and highlights the role of farm types and ecological dynamics. The second focuses on actors and highlights that farmer agency and wider social forces also play important roles. We argue that a third perspective, one focusing on relations, has the potential to overcome both the structure/agency and the ecological/social dichotomies. Indeed, a relational approach enables a closer analysis of how ecological and social processes interact to undermine or strengthen resilience. The approach also allows to identify the different relationalities that are enacted within a specific context, foregrounding diversity in farming. Furthermore, it highlights that relations are continuously made and remade, putting the emphasis on change, and on the wider patterns that enable or constrain change. A relational approach would thus contribute to overcoming a one-sided focus on states and stability, shifting attention to the patterns of relations that enable transformational change.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: A multi-functionality framework is used to critically evaluate rural and eco-tourism in the Central Amazon. This part of the region is shown to have the best potential for both consumption and productive rural activities so that this study looks at the possibility of combining tourism with farming in a multi-functional way or whether the activities merely exist side-by-side (juxtaposition) or if conflict arises due to competing land use resulting in the marginalization of the local population. Considerations of scale, market potential, accessibility and the presence of local capacities and skills are shown to be fundamental for determining whether tourism can be a viable green solution reducing deforestation and promoting social inclusion in one of the poorest and environmentally problematic regions of Brazil.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: This paper addresses the assumption that combining scientific and traditional knowledge is a promising means to elaborate alternative ways of adapting to ongoing changes that are compatible with local values and priorities. To do this, we analyze a case study of the production of heather honey in southern France. Production of this very particular type of honey, which was formerly massively exported to Germany, has dramatically declined over the two last decades. In this study, we examined the respective views of different stakeholders — beekeepers producing heather honey, specialists of heather honey production, scientists — about the specific environmental, economic and social drivers of this decline in the sector of Mont Lozère, an important region of heather honey production located in the heart of the Cevennes National Park in southern France. From our results, we conclude that information held by these three groups of stakeholders is congruent and complementary. Together, their perspectives provide a more coherent picture of the drivers of change affecting the production of heather honey than any of the perspectives taken alone. We suggest that the consilience of these distinct kinds of expertise can foster the rehabilitation of this particular honey, whose production can provide benefits that are not only economic and ecological, but also in terms of perpetuating a biocultural heritage.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: Whilst it is widely recognised in the scholarly literature that idyllic representations of the countryside are an integral part of its consumption through tourism in the contemporary, global world, little empirical research has been conducted on the role that social differentiation plays in shaping the corresponding tourist experience. The purpose of this article is to bridge that knowledge gap while studying the demand for two of the most well-known tourist accommodation products in the Portuguese countryside, namely, TER and the Pousadas. Drawing on a range of sources of material, it shows that the pastoral idyll sought by tourists is experienced differently through the lens of social class representations. In addition, there is evidence here that the choice of accommodation at a destination may well be regarded as a means of social differentiation through tourism.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: Localised animal food systems tend to be perceived as more environmentally sustainable than non-localised systems. However, these initiatives span a diverse array of projects, and the way ecological issues are considered may vary greatly depending on the actors and systems involved. With re-localisation of food chains considered a way of fostering sustainable development, this diversity should prompt a closer look at the real environmental dimension of sustainable development through livestock farming. In order to understand better how food system re-localisation trends can support environmentally sustainable development, this paper analyses the importance and place that the environmental issues may hold in localised animal food systems. We mobilize the concept of 'ecological embeddedness' to help consider how, why and to what extent natural environment influences development and shapes relationships between agents within food networks. We use the analytical framework developed by Morris and Kirwan (2011) to compare five initiatives designed to differentiate animal food products by linking their qualities to the place of production in three countries: France, Morocco, and Senegal. The comparison of the way food-systems stakeholders understand, realise, utilise, and negotiate the ecological dimensions of food production shows three different forms of ecological embeddedness depending on the way the ecological dimensions of production are linked with environmental protection issues. The first form corresponds to the Moissac case in which practices linked with ecology are very consciously highlighted as environmentally-friendly practices. The second form reflects cases in which environmentally-friendly practices and values associated to ecology exist and are highlighted through their impact on products quality, not as participating in environment protection. The third form concerns the Senegalese case in which food systems seem to be engaged in a process of ecological 'dis-embeddedness'. Finally, the comparison of different cases underlines the non-systematic coexistence between Localised Food Systems and ecological embeddedness. The "broad" systemic approach adopted here also unlocks insight into the ecological embeddedness of food systems. This analysis of collective initiatives involving different stakeholders led to consider the roles they can play in shaping the ecological embeddedness of the livestock food systems.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies
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    ABSTRACT: Since the turn of the 21st century, climate change and globalization had substantial environmental impacts on the southwestern region of Uruguay. Rural community responses to environmental challenges have been influenced by recent political decentralization governments and programs. This study explores how community governance processes under decentralization influenced the mobilization of community capitals used for adaptation to environmental stresses in four communities of southwestern Uruguay. Research methods include semi-structured interviews conducted in 2012–2013 with key informants from market, state, and civil society and participant observation and minutes from local public meetings and assemblies in four communities of this region. Consultation facilitated adaptive actions by the national government to make national governmental programs and institutions more responsive to local needs. Community empowerment for adaptive actions at the local level was minimal, due to the limited resources that have been devolved, reinforcing historic and current dependency on regional and national governmental institutions for those resources.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Rural Studies