Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal (Child Adolesc Soc Work J)

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Journal description

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal features original articles that focus on clinical social work practice with children adolescents and their families. The journal addresses current issues in the field of social work drawn from theory direct practice research and social policy as well as focuses on problems affecting specific populations in special settings.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
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Website Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal website
Other titles Child & adolescent social work journal, C & A, C and A, Child and adolescent social work
ISSN 0738-0151
OCLC 9495904
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: n this paper, the authors critically examine the plight of single parent families with young children. Next, they lay out in detail the contributions of the behavioral perspective to practice model development research with single-parent families of children under the age of 12. The authors discuss implications for future theory driven practice model development research with cultural specific single parent families. They believe that future model development research efforts with culturally diverse single parent families will aid in advancing the state of cultural competence research in social work while assisting single parents relieve suffering and enhance child and family well-being.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: n this paper, the authors critically examine the plight of single parent families with young children. Next, they lay out in detail the contributions of the behavioral perspective to practice model development research with single-parent families of children under the age of 12. The authors discuss implications for future theory driven practice model development research with cultural specific single parent families. They believe that future model development research efforts with culturally diverse single parent families will aid in advancing the state of cultural competence research in social work while assisting single parents relieve suffering and enhance child and family well-being.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: n this paper, the authors critically examine the plight of single parent families with young children. Next, they lay out in detail the contributions of the behavioral perspective to practice model development research with single-parent families of children under the age of 12. The authors discuss implications for future theory driven practice model development research with cultural specific single parent families. They believe that future model development research efforts with culturally diverse single parent families will aid in advancing the state of cultural competence research in social work while assisting single parents relieve suffering and enhance child and family well-being.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The quality of parenting, composition and socio-economic status are family risk or protective factors on juvenile delinquency, however, there is not an instrument to help psychologists and social workers to specifically assess the adolescent offender’s family. This study set out to accomplish an additional validation study of the structured interview of family assessment risk (SIFAR), a structured professional judgment tool for the assessment of family risk and protective factors of juvenile delinquents. The statistical analyses included inter-rater reliability, convergent validity with YLS/CMI, the Partial Least Squares approach to structural equation modeling and receiving operator characteristics (ROC) analysis. A sample of 130 male adolescent delinquents detained in Portuguese forensic facilities and their parents, were paired analyzed. The YLS/CMI was used to analyze the convergent validity with SIFAR. SIFAR shows a strong correlation with the YLS/CMI family context, moderate to high values of inter-rater reliability; SIFAR factors show that they are predictive determinants of the Moderate Four risk factors. ROC analysis shows adequate accuracy power. The findings show that SIFAR it is useful as an additional assessment tool for structured risk assessment instruments since it allows understanding the vulnerabilities and strengths of the delinquent’s family.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This quasi-experimental study compared family formation and perceived partner support among pregnant adolescents in a prenatal care program. Participants were assigned to either an intervention group utilizing centering pregnancy (CP) prenatal care and case management, or to a comparison group receiving case management only. Partners were invited to participate in CP group sessions. This study included 173 predominantly minority pregnant adolescents ages 15–18 years who were enrolled in a prenatal program and followed one month postpartum. Family formation included living and relationship arrangements. Perceived partner support included six domains of perceived social provisions. Data were collected through participants’ self-reports using computer-assisted self-interviews. Changes in family formation and perceptions of partner support from baseline to postpartum did not differ between intervention and comparison groups. Male partners who attended at least one CP session were perceived as more supportive at both the beginning and end of the program than partners who did not attend any sessions. After combining groups, pregnant adolescents reported a significant shift in family formation and increased monetary support from partners from baseline to postpartum. Partner support is important for ensuring positive pregnancy outcomes. Additional strategies are needed to engage young fathers who do not readily provide support during pregnancy.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The objective of this work is to (1) study the prevalence of cyber-bullying amongst adolescents referred by Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) for urgent psychiatric assessment and (2) to examine the association between cyber-bullying and suicidal behavior to assist emergency department professionals in screening for risk and triage. This is a retrospective study of patients referred by PED to an urgent psychiatric clinic. Data was extracted for those with bullying victimization. Clinical variables included demographics, reason for referral, type of bullying, substance use, abuse, past psychiatric history, diagnosis and outcome. The cyber-bullying group was compared to those with traditional bullying and a group with no-bullying. Data analysis was conducted using Chi squares, multinomial and bimodal logistic regression. The urgent psychiatric clinic assessed 805 patients in 24 months, the prevalence of bullying was 26.9 % (n = 217). The prevalence of Cyber-bullying was 13.5 % (n = 109) and traditional bullying was 13.4 % (n = 108). Cyber-bullying victims have more suicidal ideation (χ² = 7.82, p = .005; 85.3 vs. 69.4 %), more sexual abuse (χ² = 5.75, p = .02; 29.4 vs. 15.7 %), more emotional abuse (χ² = 10.8, p = .01; 30.3 vs. 12.0 %) and physical abuse (χ² = 6.13, p = .01; 27.5 vs. 13.9 %) and a higher inpatient admission rate. Suicidal ideation is the presenting problem in more than two-thirds of patients, especially females, with history of cyber-bullying who present to the PED. Screening questions about cyber-bullying could assist emergency room professionals in establishing risk and making triage decisions.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer-identified (LGBTQ) youth are a population with a unique set of service needs. Existing research on effective service methods with LGBTQ youth is limited. Youth empowerment holds potential as an approach that can impact well-being among youth who face discrimination. The current study explores the relationship between the social justice youth development framework (Ginwright and James, New Directions Youth Dev 96:27–46, 2002) and youth empowerment in a sample of LGBTQ youth. Multiple regression analysis of data collected through a community-based youth program identified critical consciousness and community engagement as significant predictors of empowerment. Findings suggest that programs that promote these factors among LGBTQ youth using the social justice youth development framework may enhance empowerment thereby increasing other aspects of well-being.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Truancy and related school attendance issues are serious problems nationwide, and are often the result of a punitive school-based paradigm that harms more students than the protocols help. While some school districts and juvenile courts have shifted toward a rehabilitative paradigm and approach truancy with preventive efforts, unfortunately, this is not the norm. This manuscript summarizes and reviews: (1) the prevalence of the problems within schools and juvenile courts; (2) truancy and delinquency’s inter-related risk and protective factors for children and adolescents and the disproportionate impact on some students; and (3) the evidence of what schools and related stakeholders can do to improve student truancy/attendance problem outcomes. The analysis concludes with case examples from two states (Colorado and Ohio) that have taken dichotomous approaches to addressing truancy, and what child and adolescent social workers should do to fix the problems.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The continued development of the Urban Hassles Index (UHI) as a tool for understanding the exposure of urban adolescents to chronic stressors is expanded to include the severity of each stressor. Coping strategies—positive or negative—in response to stressors is examined. The UHI continues to reflect strong psychometric properties. Exposure to stress is not differentiated by gender; however, findings reflect different coping strategies utilized by gender. Suggestions for improving the UHI along with the importance of continued examination of the chronic stressors and their impact on adolescent developmental milestones are presented.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal