Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal (Child Adolesc Soc Work J)

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Journal description

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal features original articles that focus on clinical social work practice with children adolescents and their families. The journal addresses current issues in the field of social work drawn from theory direct practice research and social policy as well as focuses on problems affecting specific populations in special settings.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal website
Other titles Child & adolescent social work journal, C & A, C and A, Child and adolescent social work
ISSN 0738-0151
OCLC 9495904
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: n this paper, the authors critically examine the plight of single parent families with young children. Next, they lay out in detail the contributions of the behavioral perspective to practice model development research with single-parent families of children under the age of 12. The authors discuss implications for future theory driven practice model development research with cultural specific single parent families. They believe that future model development research efforts with culturally diverse single parent families will aid in advancing the state of cultural competence research in social work while assisting single parents relieve suffering and enhance child and family well-being.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: n this paper, the authors critically examine the plight of single parent families with young children. Next, they lay out in detail the contributions of the behavioral perspective to practice model development research with single-parent families of children under the age of 12. The authors discuss implications for future theory driven practice model development research with cultural specific single parent families. They believe that future model development research efforts with culturally diverse single parent families will aid in advancing the state of cultural competence research in social work while assisting single parents relieve suffering and enhance child and family well-being.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: n this paper, the authors critically examine the plight of single parent families with young children. Next, they lay out in detail the contributions of the behavioral perspective to practice model development research with single-parent families of children under the age of 12. The authors discuss implications for future theory driven practice model development research with cultural specific single parent families. They believe that future model development research efforts with culturally diverse single parent families will aid in advancing the state of cultural competence research in social work while assisting single parents relieve suffering and enhance child and family well-being.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Various forms of expressive arts are known to have associations with positive academic, social, and behavioral outcomes in addition to offering important therapeutic benefits for children and adolescents. However, very limited knowledge has been developed regarding specific expressive arts interventions for promoting positive youth development and preventing problematic behaviors in youth from urban, low socioeconomic neighborhoods. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to expand the nascent research area in arts interventions by evaluating an expressive art intervention offered to youth through a positive youth development program located in several public housing neighborhoods. Quasi-experimental design was applied to test the impact of a poetry-focused art intervention on self-reported perceptions of academics, social competence, and multicultural attitudes of a culturally diverse sample of 40 urban sixth to eighth grade youth. Participants were recruited through a positive youth development program located in the public housing neighborhoods where they reside. Pre and post data were collected. Prior to the arts intervention, there were no statistically significant differences between the youth on self-report measures of academic capacity and social competence. The first group of youth who participated in the intervention reported enhanced capacity on all three measures when compared to peers who had not yet participated in the program. However, the second group of youth to receive the program showed no statistically significant gains when compared to their peers who received the intervention first. The study provides compelling support to further explore the efficacy of expressive arts on influencing attributes of positive youth development among urban adolescents. In addition, the study offers valuable insights into the process and complexities involved in developing agency partnerships and conducting research on after-school programs.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer-identified (LGBTQ) youth are a population with a unique set of service needs. Existing research on effective service methods with LGBTQ youth is limited. Youth empowerment holds potential as an approach that can impact well-being among youth who face discrimination. The current study explores the relationship between the social justice youth development framework (Ginwright and James, New Directions Youth Dev 96:27–46, 2002) and youth empowerment in a sample of LGBTQ youth. Multiple regression analysis of data collected through a community-based youth program identified critical consciousness and community engagement as significant predictors of empowerment. Findings suggest that programs that promote these factors among LGBTQ youth using the social justice youth development framework may enhance empowerment thereby increasing other aspects of well-being.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Truancy and related school attendance issues are serious problems nationwide, and are often the result of a punitive school-based paradigm that harms more students than the protocols help. While some school districts and juvenile courts have shifted toward a rehabilitative paradigm and approach truancy with preventive efforts, unfortunately, this is not the norm. This manuscript summarizes and reviews: (1) the prevalence of the problems within schools and juvenile courts; (2) truancy and delinquency’s inter-related risk and protective factors for children and adolescents and the disproportionate impact on some students; and (3) the evidence of what schools and related stakeholders can do to improve student truancy/attendance problem outcomes. The analysis concludes with case examples from two states (Colorado and Ohio) that have taken dichotomous approaches to addressing truancy, and what child and adolescent social workers should do to fix the problems.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the authors critically examine the plight of single parent families with young children. Next, they lay out in detail the contributions of the behavioral perspective to practice model development research with single-parent families of children under the age of 12. The authors discuss implications for future theory driven practice model development research with cultural specific single parent families. They believe that future model development research efforts with culturally diverse single parent families will aid in advancing the state of cultural competence research in social work while assisting single parents relieve suffering and enhance child and family well-being.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the number of residents requiring corrective lenses in a youth detention center for juveniles from 12 to 18 years old over a 2-year period. A greater number of adolescents incarcerated for criminal activity in a detention center had uncorrected refractive errors (34.87 %) as compared to a comparable population in the public school system (22 %). The prevalence of significant refractive errors among incarcerated adolescents in this study is significantly higher than has been reported previously. The current study found a refractive error rate of almost 35 %. This difference can be explained by a number of factors in their social environments and identifies an area for potential intervention to reduce antisocial behavior in this population.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Nationally, the outcomes for youth aging out of foster care are dismal. Most children leaving foster care do not have the financial, medical, or social support tools necessary to bridge this transition successfully, placing a significant burden on youth leaving care (Courtney, Piliavin, Grogan, & Nesmith in Child Welfare 80:685–717, 2001; Kools & Kennedy in Pediatric Nursing 29(1):39–45, 2003; Simms, Dubowitz, & Szilagyi in Pediatrics 106:909–918, 2000). Given the poor outcomes for youth aging out of foster care, and the small body of literature on what works to improve outcomes, the purpose of this study was twofold. First to examine youth characteristics associated with better outcomes, and secondly to explore what program characteristics were correlated with outcomes. A causal comparative research design was used, employing pre-existing data. Records were collected from an agency in a large urban/suburban area in the State of Texas. Data was collected from both the Transition Resource Action Center (TRAC) and Children’s Protective Services databases. To determine outcomes, both TRAC’s Self-Sufficiency Matrix and case records were used. TRAC’s Self-Sufficiency Matrix has five domains: Education, Employment, Employability, Financial Literacy, and Shelter. t tests were used to examine differences in outcomes between youth who received TRAC services before and after leaving care. t tests were also used to examine changes in overall Self-Sufficiency Matrix scores. Furthermore, linear and stepwise regressions were conducted to determine which variables were predictive of scores on the Self-Sufficiency Matrix. The results of this study indicate that TRAC is having a positive influence on the youth receiving services. Youth show significant improvement across four of the five identified domains and maintained on the fifth domain, employment. Implications for research practice and policy are presented.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
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    ABSTRACT: For over two decades, practitioners, advocates, and scholars involved with the U.S. child welfare system have engaged in coordinated efforts to increase the number of foster youth who find stable, permanent homes through adoption or guardianship, and these efforts have been shaped and guided by federal policies and directives. As a result, the number of children adopted or placed into guardianship out of foster care has increased significantly. This trend has significant implications for child welfare research, policy, and practice. However, the risk and protective factors for post-permanency discontinuity, or placement changes that occur after legal finalization of an adoption or guardianship, have received little attention in the literature. Also, many previous studies that investigated post-permanency adjustment for former foster youth have been limited by serious design and/or conceptual flaws. The purpose of this study is to investigate the peer-reviewed literature that examines risk or protective factors for discontinuity, or outcomes proximal to discontinuity, for older foster youth. A systematic search located 18 quantitative, quasi-experimental studies published in peer-reviewed journals that implemented multivariable methods. This review finds that the quality of the research evidence is generally weak, but previous studies do suggest several risk and protective factors for post-permanency discontinuity, including child, family, and service characteristics.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Youth-led program development, organizing, research, and health promotion have been identified as an important practices for community practitioners. Since such practices target vulnerable youth, it is critical that such empowerment programs are trauma-informed. This paper addresses trauma, its potential impacts, and cultural differences in understanding trauma as well as the assumptions of empowerment and youth-led programming. The relationship between health and empowerment is described as well as how youth empowerment programs can specifically target symptoms of powerlessness, low self-esteem and interpersonal difficulties, commonly experienced by youth living in socially toxic environments. Implications for program development, research, and policy are considered.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal