Noise Control Engineering Journal (NOISE CONTROL ENG J)

Publisher: Institute of Noise Control Engineering; Acoustical Society of America

Journal description

Noise Control Engineering Journal is the technical publication of the Institute of Noise Control Engineering. NCEJ is issued bimonthly, and contains technical articles on all aspects of noise control engineering.

Current impact factor: 0.23

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 0.227
2013 Impact Factor 0.462
2012 Impact Factor 0.315
2011 Impact Factor 0.223
2010 Impact Factor 0.245
2009 Impact Factor 0.138
2008 Impact Factor 0.167
2007 Impact Factor 0.317
2006 Impact Factor 0.186
2005 Impact Factor 0.17
2004 Impact Factor 0.175
2003 Impact Factor 0.304
2002 Impact Factor 0.07
2001 Impact Factor 0.121
2000 Impact Factor 0.197
1999 Impact Factor 0.241
1998 Impact Factor 0.115
1997 Impact Factor 0.204

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.38
Cited half-life 8.20
Immediacy index 0.06
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.14
Website Noise Control Engineering Journal (NCEJ) website
Other titles Noise control engineering journal
ISSN 0736-2501
OCLC 8974064
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Among underground coal miners, hearing loss remains one of the most common occupational illnesses. In response to this problem, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) conducts research to reduce the noise emission of underground coal-mining equipment, an example of which is a roof bolting machine. Field studies show that, on average, drilling noise is the most significant contributor to a roof bolting machine operator's noise exposure. NIOSH OMSHR has determined that the drill steel and chuck are the dominant sources of drilling noise. NIOSH OMSHR, Corry Rubber Corporation, and Kennametal, Inc. have developed a bit isolator that breaks the steel-to-steel link between the drill bit and drill steel and a chuck isolator that breaks the mechanical connection between the drill steel and the chuck, thus reducing the noise radiated by the drill steel and chuck, and the noise exposure of the roof bolter operator. This paper documents the evolution of the bit isolator and chuck isolator including various alternative designs which may enhance performance. Laboratory testing confirms that production bit and chuck isolators reduce the A-weighted sound level generated during drilling by 3.7 to 6.6 dB. Finally, this paper summarizes results of a finite element analysis used to explore the key parameters of the drill bit isolator and chuck isolator to understand the impact these parameters have on noise.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, a method for designing a robust internal model control (IMC) structured feedback active noise controller is considered. For feedback active noise control (ANC) systems, the IMC structure is preferred because of the possibility of applying an adaptive filter in the controller and the simplicity of satisfying the stability if an accurate secondary path model is available. In practice, however, model uncertainties exist so that the robust stability of the controller must be considered during the controller design process. Moreover, the waterbed effect for feedback control of a time-delayed system will cause noise amplification (NA) at some frequencies out of the target band of control. Against these problems, this paper proposes a controller design method in which a constraint for the control filter coefficients is found to ensure the robust stability and limit the NA caused by the waterbed effect to within a given value. In comparison with the design process in the frequency domain, this method can use an adaptive algorithm to obtain a robust controller solution in the time domain. Once the time domain constraint has been obtained, it can also be used in the online IMC feedback ANC system. Computer simulations and experiments in an anechoic chamber are performed to validate the method. The results indicate that this method is effective for the design of a robust controller with constrained NA.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Methods based on microphone array measurements provide a powerful tool for determining the location and magnitude of acoustic sources. For stationary sources, sophisticated algorithms working in the frequency domain can be applied. By using circularly arranged arrays and interpolating between microphone signals it is possible to treat rotating sources, as are present in fans, as being non-moving. Measurements conducted with a four-bladed fan and analyzed with the “virtual rotating array” method show that it is not only possible to identify the main noise contributors, but also to determine a full spectrum for any rotating component of interest.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Three numerical simulations on the NASA active noise control fan (ANCF) rig have been performed to investigate rotor-stator interaction noise on a realistic turbofan with a high hub-to-tip ratio. These simulations achieved with the Power Flow solver based on the Lattice Boltzmann method provide very good direct acoustic prediction for both tonal and broadband noise. The tonal noise directivity is noticeably very well captured. These reliable results are then used to validate the implementation of in-duct rotor-wake interaction noise based on Amiet's analytical isolated blade response, in the in-house OPTIBRUI solver. The required detailed wake excitation is obtained by an averaging procedure that extracts the wake information from the numerical results while removing the potential effect. The analytical results for the rotor-stator interaction compare well with the detailed duct-modes measurements performed on the ANCF configuration. The influence of the stator vane count and the rotor-stator distance of the wake evolution is also emphasized and well captured on these well documented configurations. The precise description of the blade geometry in terms of stagger is also shown to be a key parameter for a realistic noise radiation upstream and downstream.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of adjusting the excitation input as a method for modifying impact sound was investigated. The radiation from the impact can be described using a convolution of an impulse response function for a vibro-acoustic system and the corresponding impact excitation function. Therefore, the radiated sound can be changed by modifying both the impact excitation function and the structural response. Excitation with complicate shapes of input which is required to make an arbitrary shape of wave form, such as selective excitation or rejection of a specific frequency component, is not easy for manually operated traditional system. However, the modification of excitation input is useful for the automated system with an electrically controlled impactor, such as a servo-motor. As a practical application, a punching process of a punch press machine was designed to not only reduce the overall sound pressure level but also improve the perceived sound quality. Sound from a punch press can be improved by dividing the punching process into several steps with different stroke speeds without substantially reducing the cutting surface quality.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: It is known that speed bumps are devices capable of reducing the speed of vehicles (traffic calming measures). Bumps arranged in sequence are capable of inducing a speed regime almost constant along the road sections in which they are installed. However, the impact of vehicles on the bumps generates noise that is annoying to residents. Many studies in the literature have estimated the production of noise due to the transit of vehicles over isolated speed bumps. Less investigated, however, is the phenomenon of the noise production on the speed bumps arranged in a sequence. In this paper, the authors analyze the effects of speed bumps arranged in a sequence on the production of noise. In order to do this, two urban road sections are selected with several speed bumps placed sequentially. The survey was carried out experimentally using three vehicles (a low-powered car, a high-powered car and a motorcycle). The authors, using sound level meters data, assessed the sound levels produced by these vehicles, considering the conditionings on the dynamics of motion induced by the sequence of bumps.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the free and forced in-plane vibration analysis of rectangular plates are performed for the first time using an improved Fourier series method, in which the boundary restraining spring stiffness can vary in any functional pattern along each edge. Two-dimensional improved Fourier series displacement forms are constructed with four supplementary polynomials introduced into the standard 2-D Fourier series to make the field functions sufficiently smooth in the whole solving domain. Energy formulations are employed to describe the in-plane dynamics of plate system, in which the in-plane concentrated point force is taken into account in the form of work term. All the unknown Fourier series coefficients are then solved through the Rayleigh-Ritz procedure. Several numerical examples are given to demonstrate the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed model through the comparison with those calculated via finite element analysis (FEA). The results show that these two results can agree very well with each other for various non-uniform boundary conditions. Based on the established model, the in-plane vibration response is also studied. Some curves and contours are obtained to illustrate how the boundary restraining stiffnesses affect the in-plane point and transfer mobility of rectangular plate structure.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Great efforts into implementing numerical methods for performance and sound prediction can be observed in the fan and blower industry. Trust in results from simulation, however, often relies on experimental validation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the low pressure rotor-only fan "USI7" which has been used as a generic test fan in several projects at the University of Siegen and elsewhere for several years.We present our own experimental results such as performance and sound characteristics, turbulent inflow statistics and sound spectra as well as the test rigs employed to obtain the data. The idea behind is to foster benchmarking of present and new steady-state and unsteady aerodynamic and aeroacoustic prediction methods within the community. Thus, to any individual we will provide full geometry of the fan as well as all experimental data.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Flexible, open-cell polymeric foams are among the most commonly used and effective materials for passively dissipating noise and vibration. Their unique cellular structure results in materials which are lightweight but still highly absorptive, making them particularly useful for weight-sensitive applications, such as aircraft cabin noise reduction. "Nanocomposite" polymeric foams, which are synthesized from polymeric materials containing nanoscale fillers (e.g. carbon nanotubes and silicate nanoclays), have altered morphological and mechanical properties in comparison to conventional counterparts. Many of these same properties intrinsically control the sound absorption characteristics of polymeric foams. Thus, by utilizing nanoscale fillers to control relevant morphological and mechanical properties, polymeric foams with enhanced sound absorption properties could potentially be created. In this study, various composites of polyurethane foam and multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized and then experimentally characterized to observe the effects of the nanofiller infusion on sound absorption in terms of the normal incidence sound absorption coefficient. Additionally, a number of related material parameters were measured including porosity, flow resistivity, elastic modulus, loss factor, and density, and connections were made between the effects of the carbon nanotubes on these properties and the observed changes to sound absorption. Results indicated that polymeric foams infused with multi-walled carbon nanotubes exhibited an increased ratio of sound absorption to density, depending on the weight fraction of carbon nanotubes dispersed within the foam.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Singular spectrum analysis is developed for the processing of nonlinear vibration measurements containing noise in structural damage detection. The method uses system augmentation to make the nonlinear system into an augmented linear system. The measured response of the system is decomposed and the corresponding decomposition subspace of the components which contains the least interference is reconstructed. Direct system parameter identification technique is then used to solve the model properties of the augmented system. Minimum rank perturbation theory is generalized so that it can be applied to detect local damage of the augmented system. Excellent identification results are obtained when Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is applied, while identification result that without applying SSA shows large errors. The enhanced method is shown to be capable of yielding accurate identified results with noisy measurement in nonlinear systems.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years the concept of the acoustic black hole (ABH) has been developed as an efficient, passive, lightweight absorber of bending waves in beams and plates. ABHs are implemented into structures by introducing a smoothly decreasing local change in the thickness of a beam or plate according to a power lawfunction. By having the beam or plate thickness decrease to zero the bending wave speed theoretically goes to zero and the waves never reflect back from the thin edge; thus they are "absorbed." ABH theory does not account for impedance mismatches between a uniform beam, and impedance mismatches within the ABH taper, which can cause bending waves to reflect off of an ABH, hindering performance. In this study numerical models were used to investigate the reflection of bending waves from ABHs attached to uniform beams with and without anechoic terminations. It was shown that the reflection of bending waves trended similarly to the normalized wavenumber variation, a parameter that determines whether or not fundamental theoretical assumptions are valid. The results will be useful for the design, characterization and optimization of vibration attenuation performance of acoustic black holes.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The absorption coefficient of perforated plate absorbers largely depends on the acoustic resistance of the backing layer, adjacent to the plate itself. The optimization process of Helmholtz resonators is focused on the maximization of their absorption coefficients, by tuning the acoustic resistance and reactance of the overall absorbing system. In this paper, the comparison of acoustic resistance of a perforated plate absorber for two characteristic cases is shown: one with a thin porous layer glued tightly to the backing of the perforated plate, and the other with a thin porous layer placed near the perforations, without tight contact. The measurements were done in the Kundt's tube, by using four characteristic porosities of the plate (4.4%, 8.5%, 12.9% and 16.9%) and a 2 mm thick porous layer. The porous layer can be simply added to the acoustic resistance in the case of its tight placement to the perforated plate. On the other hand, absorber resistance is much less increased when a loosely placed porous layer is introduced to the perforations, but still shows a positive correlation with the resistance increase in the case of tight placement. Ratios of measured resistances are shown for the mentioned cases, and a range of useful values of those ratios is introduced as an improvement to the analytical expression used for calculating the acoustic impedance. A novel correction factor for calculating acoustic resistance of a perforated plate with porous layer in loose contact is proposed. (C) 2015 Institute of Noise Control Engineering.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The unidirectional acoustic boundary has broad application prospects. Besides the strongly nonlinear acoustic medium, which can be applied in the realization of the unidirectional acoustic boundary, the present paper proposes a new approach through the active control method, where the secondary source has the property of single directivity. In order to validate its effectiveness in onedimensional duct, experiments are implemented in three steps: 1. construct the secondary source with the single directivity by two loudspeakers; 2. design the steady unidirectional acoustic boundary by the secondary source in step 1; 3. implement the adaptive unidirectional acoustic boundary by the secondary source in step 1, and through FXLMS algorithm. Results show that the presented approach is feasible and effective for one-dimensional unidirectional acoustic boundary, and the system only contains two traditional loudspeakers and two traditional microphones; thus it will be more feasible for practical realizations of the unidirectional acoustic boundary, compared with the acoustic diode.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The acoustic reductions achieved with the current damping solutions for railway wheels that appear in the state of the art were obtained with different railway wheel designs, under different measurement scenarios (laboratory and on track), under different testing conditions, making it impossible to compare these damping solutions in a straightforward manner. The aim of this paper is to analyse, measure and estimate the behaviour of damping solutions installed on the same railway wheel and under the same testing conditions. Experimental measurements were carried out in the laboratory on wheels that are currently in use in metro lines. Damping solutions that were evaluated are ring damper, friction damper and sandwich-type constrained layer damper. Results show that ring and friction dampers are dependent on the applied preload and that they can only dissipate energy at high frequencies. Sandwich-type constrained layer dampers are the only damping solution that can add damping at low frequencies, but it is essential that they be properly designed in order to significantly increase the final wheel damping.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to evaluate the acoustical quality of outdoor acoustic spaces in nature based on soundscape approach. Acoustic taxonomy of sonic events, acoustic itineraries and acoustic calendars were studied at a national park. Long time noise level measurements were performed. In addition, acoustical quality of outdoor acoustic spaces was investigated by impulse response measurements and auralization techniques. A questionnaire was administered to qualitatively evaluate acoustical quality of the acoustic spaces. The results reveal the importance of acoustical evaluation of acoustic spaces in nature. The acoustical quality of sonic events is determined by that of the acoustical spaces that are characterized by natural elements. The sound reflections off the natural surfaces of the acoustic spaces are characterized by the impulse response technique. Subjects with critical listening experience have significantly different perception of sounds in terms of Loudness, Reverberance, Echoes, Naturalness and Musical Quality among different outdoor acoustical spaces.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Noise Control Engineering Journal