Journal of prison & jail health

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Other titles Journal of prison & jail health, Journal of prison and jail health
ISSN 0731-8332
OCLC 8261167
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Addresses the steps that need to be taken to care for the increasing population of elderly inmates in America's prisons. Safety, medical care, and programs that build good morale are identified as major areas of concern. Particular attention is paid to identifying the special needs of the elderly and how these can best be met within the corrections environment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1993 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Examined the differential health service needs of 399 male and female youths (aged 10–18 yrs) entering a juvenile detention center. Comparisons were made on sociodemographic characteristics, family problems, records of contact with the juvenile court, physical abuse or sexual victimization history, alcohol/other drug use, friends' involvement in substance use and crime, and emotional/psychological functioning problems. A stepwise discriminant analysis of the data indicates that female detainees were significantly more likely to have been sexually victimized and to have more contact with a juvenile court for status offense reasons and for being sexually abused/exploited, whereas male detainees had higher referral rates for delinquency offenses and self-reported greater participation in theft crimes. It is suggested that mental health oriented programs are especially needed for female youths involved in the juvenile justice system. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1993 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Results from the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) showed that a significant number of inmates manifest symptoms of mental illness. On the basis of an empirically derived criterion measure from the MMPI, inmates were divided into "high psychopathology" (HP) and "low psychopathology" (LP) groups. Evidence of greater psychopathology among inmates in the HP group was corroborated by self-reported symptoms of mental illness from the ASI. HP inmates compared to others sampled were more likely to report lifetime use of amphetamines, hallucinogens, and heroin. They also reported slightly more alcohol and cocaine use in the month prior to treatment. Higher psychopathology was associated with more problems in employment/financial support, family and social relationships, physical health, and within the legal system. The study findings emphasize the need for mental health screening, assessment, and treatment to supplement substance abuse services provided within the criminal justice system.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1992 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Argues that prison health workers must manage prison pathology both clinically and from the perspective of its public health implications. Health problems that are experienced on both sides of prison walls include substance abuse, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), hepatitis, trauma, violence, tuberculosis, suicide, mental illness, and venereal disease. It is suggested that prison health workers join with state and local health professionals to assure that both personal and public health needs are optimally served. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1991 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Studied the physical and psychological health problems that incarcerated women have at the time of incarceration and after a period of incarceration. Data were collected through interviews with 135 women during the 1st wk of their incarceration and follow-up interviews with 55 of the Ss after 6 mo in prison. Results reveal that women enter prison with numerous health problems and that these problems persist. Specific health problems documented were severe psychological disturbances, substance abuse, obesity, and gynecological disorders, as well as numerous stress-related symptoms. Ss also exhibited a high utilization rate of health care services. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1991 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Delinquent youth represent a high risk group for contracting HIV infection. This article describes a prevention model that integrates HIV risk assessment and reduction activities with the provision of medical and substance abuse treatment services at a short-term detention center. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, this program links a university-based medical department, a juvenile probation department and a county medical/psychiatric department in service delivery. This paper discusses the implementation phase and summarizes the risk factors for the 750 youth served in the first two years of the program. Issues relating to the youth's ongoing medical needs, AIDS prevention needs, and interagency collaboration are addressed also.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1991 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Collected data in the 2nd phase of a longitudinal study previously reported on by R. Dembo et al (in press) involving young residents at a detention center. Initial interviews were conducted with 399 detainees and follow-up interviews were completed with 236 male and 69 female Ss 11–14 mo later. Findings highlight the different roles played by Ss' physical abuse and sexual victimization experiences in their use of marijuana/hashish and cocaine over time. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1990 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this project was to study the effect of relaxation teaching on sleep, anxiety and sick call in a prison population. While relaxation training has been effective in other health settings, it has not been tested in a prison setting. A quasi-experimental design was used with an experimental group (N=20) and control group (N=20). The Richards Campbell Sleep Questionaire was used to test the level of sleep, and Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory was used to test the level of anxiety. Sick call requests were recorded in the daily log. The relaxation teaching was based on Herbert Benson's ''Relaxation Response'' method. While not significant, the trends for sleep, anxiety and sick call were in the predicted direction, which is considered justification for future studies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1990 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Investigated the prevalence of mental disorder among 190 male prison inmates (aged 15+ yrs) using a needs assessment survey for prison populations. 45 Ss had at least 1 inpatient psychiatric experience prior to incarceration. 23 Ss had been admitted to inpatient psychiatric units during incarceration. The frequency of hospitalizations was 1 admission, 50%; 2 admissions, 25%; 3+ admissions, 25%. 26 additional inmates had received nonresidential, clinic-based, psychiatric care consisting of verbal therapy or psychopharmacology. Medical record abstraction indicated that 12.6% of Ss were currently receiving psychiatric treatment with an additional 4.2% requiring but refusing prescribed treatment. The prevalence of psychiatric disability was 19.5% needing treatment, with an additional 8.9% with possible psychiatric problems requiring further evaluation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1989 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews the literature on the health status of juvenile delinquents, including a community perspective conceptual model; overviews of adolescents, juvenile delinquency and the learning disability/juvenile delinquency association; assessments of the health problems of juvenile delinquents; and the health care delivery systems in juvenile systems. Most articles are on assessment and description. Largely absent are the areas of planning, implementation and evaluation. 12 recommendations address system needs for juvenile delinquent health care delivery, including (1) seeking system-wide accreditation; (2) interacting with community health caregivers, educators and institutions; and (3) cooperating with existing data gathering and research institutions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1989 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Thesis (M.S.N.)--University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, 1984. Bibliography: leaves 73-75. Microfiche.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1987 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews the literature on the problem of the incarceration of mentally ill persons. Because most jails are ill-equipped to provide the required diagnosis and treatment, the problem of self-destructive behavior often arises. The need for mental health screening in jails is noted, and more involvement of mental health professionals in finding appropriate solutions is advocated. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1985 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Studied medical charts and confinement records, and reviewed other data on the 38 male prisoners who committed suicide from January 1980 to October 1985, while incarcerated under the authority of the Texas Department of Corrections. Data are provided according to age, race, sex, marital status, criminal history, offense for which the S was incarcerated at the time of suicide, length of sentence, history of mental illness and prior suicide attempts, involvement of alcohol or drugs, and characteristics of the suicide act. It appears that the most salient characteristics include a history of mental illness and suicide attempts and conviction of a death-related offense. Verbal threats of suicide, bizarre or withdrawn behavior, and recent message of bad news were situational characteristics significantly associated with suicide. Policy recommendations are outlined. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1985 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Describes efforts to serve mentally retarded inmates in the Georgia State Prison (GSP). Strategies in identifying mentally retarded inmates (e.g., assessment of intelligence and adaptive behavior) and implementing programs for them (e.g., development of individualized educational plans) are detailed. The program grew out of a lawsuit brought by inmates at GSP in 1973, and it mandates habilitation by means of educational, vocational, life skills programs, and by group counseling. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1985 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Reports results of a national survey undertaken in 1983 to determine the availability of health services in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. Deficiencies identified included the need for ongoing mental health care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1984 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Self-mutilation and self-induced illness are common among prisoners in whom they represent desperate coping mechanisms adopted to the counter the stresses of violent, isolated penal environments. Often a deceptive clinical presentation mimicking accidental injury or spontaneous illness delays correct diagnosis of self-mutiliation or self-induced illness. The diagnosis of self-induced medical conditions is important in planning appropriate therapy. I present six cases of prisoners with self-mutiliation and self-induced illness to illustrate the difficulty in diagnosis. By categorizing the methods of inducing injuries and illnesses, I recognize certain clinical syndromes that indicate the possibility of self-multilation and other self-induced illness.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1984 · Journal of prison & jail health

  • No preview · Article · Jan 1983 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence is mounting that people working in correctional facilities experience a significant amount of stress in their jobs, which may lead to high job turnover, high rates of sick leave and troubled relations with inmates, other staff, and family members. This article looks at the stress experienced by these workers from a medical anthropological and psychiatric perspective. In particular, it focuses on the structural and cultural parameters of work stress in the correctional environment.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1982 · Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Due to the nature of prison conditions, inmate codes, and staff attitudes, prison administrators and the general public fail to appreciate the extent and seriousness of rape in prison. Inmate rape is not primarily a sexually motivated act but instead constitutes a sexual expression of aggression that may be retaliatory, compensatory, and/or erotic. The trauma experienced by a male inmate victim of rape may be even more devastating than for a female victim since he is devalued in regard to the 2 primary sources of his male identity; sexuality and aggression. In addition, he continues to live in the same institution as his attacker. Civil litigation regarding institutional liability is increasing, and it is incumbent upon correctional institutions to train their personnel in regard to identifying, treating, and preventing inmate sexual abuse. The major features to be addressed for a model protocol are presented. (10 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Jan 1982 · Journal of prison & jail health