Higher Education Research and Development (High Educ Res Dev)

Publisher: Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia, Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

Higher Education Research and Development is a long established refereed international journal. It is the principal learned journal of the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia. The journal combines traditional hard copy publication and expert reviewing with electronic publication of extended abstracts, which are open to peer comment. The aim is to further debate and provide opportunities for more immediate and wider comment. The journal aims to inform improvements in practice through reporting research and evaluations and promoting scholarly reflective articles on practice, policy and theory. The journal, is addressed to university and college faculty from all disciplines and to higher education administrators. Contributions come from around the globe and the topics addressed are of world wide concern. Of the three issues each year one is focused on a particular theme, with a guest editor. The theme for the 1997 special issue is Phenomenography and its impact on research and practice in higher education. This will be edited by Christine Bruce and Rod Gerber. The contributors will include Shirley Booth, Gloria Dall'Alba, Noel Entwistle, Michael Prosser, Keith Trigwell and Lennart Svensson.

Current impact factor: 0.90

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 7.80
Immediacy index 0.09
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Higher Education Research and Development website
Other titles Higher education research & development (Online), Higher education research and development
ISSN 0729-4360
OCLC 45107634
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: The effects that admission criteria may have for under-represented groups are an important concern for programs seeking to improve access to post-secondary education. Using data from a large preservice teacher education program in the Canadian province of Ontario, we demonstrate two approaches to evaluating the effects of admission criteria. The first approach uses survival analysis to compare the effects of minimum admission criteria for determining the admissibility of applicants. The second approach compares the actual admission decisions with the decisions that would have been made using eight alternative sets of rules with varying emphases on academic preparation, ratings of applicants’ essays and applicants’ demographic information. Both approaches offer insights into the roles of specific admission criteria in addressing under-representation.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: International students have continued to be the focus of simplistic stereotyping in media discourse where they are frequently identified as one of the forces behind declining academic standards in Australian universities. Their English language skills, in particular, have continued to be the focus of debate both in the mainstream media and in higher education research and policy. It is argued in this paper, however, that such debates do not sufficiently acknowledge the moral and affective complexity of the so-called ‘English problem’ amongst international students in Australian universities. Drawing from an analysis of small group interviews with international students, domestic students and university staff, the beliefs and experiences of various parties about the English language skills of international students are examined. A key finding from this analysis is that the English language skills of international students, and their concomitant interactions with others, can be the object of both complaints and troubles talk. These complaints or troubles can be either ratified or resisted by those participants. The difficulties international students may experience in using English thus have complex moral and affective consequences. The way in which the so-called English problem in Australian universities is generally couched as one of objective, measurable deficiency on the part of international students arguably neglects the moral and affective complexity of the difficulties facing international students. This neglect leads, in turn, to an impoverished understanding of the English language capabilities of international students.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: Doctoral training is strongly focused on honing research skills at the expense of developing teaching competency. As a result, emerging academics are unprepared for the pedagogical requirements of their early-career academic roles. Employing an action research approach, this study investigates the effectiveness of a competency-based teaching development intervention that aims to improve the teaching self-efficacy of doctoral candidates. To conduct this research, we apply the theoretical framework of Cognitive Apprenticeship Theory, a theory of social learning that requires learners to participate in a community of inquiry. Participants report significantly higher levels of teaching self-efficacy and a stronger sense of connectedness to the wider academic community.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: Current discussions in higher education and alumni training acknowledge the challenges training programs face in responding to the authentic needs of the labor market. In addition to academic knowledge, higher education institutions are expected to provide general twenty-first-century skills, such as problem-solving, critical thinking, collaboration, and interpersonal skills. To meet these challenges, many institutions utilize collaborative pedagogies such as learning in teams. However, teamwork in higher education tends to focus primarily on the task aspects of performance at the expense of the team aspects, and for educators, there may be no feasible way to assess whether the students are learning to work successfully as teams. This paper explores how new student teams (n = 3) that simulate real business teams by taking a challenging entrepreneur assessment, developed over three semesters for general skills (i.e., communication), and whether the improvement in their communication also indicated the teams’ improved performance (i.e., financial success). As an analytical tool, the study relies on initial parameters on teams’ microdynamics of communication [Losada, M. (1999). The complex dynamics of high performance teams. Mathematical and Computer Modelling, 30, 179–192] normalized with fuzzy logic. In accordance with the current understanding of team development, the results did not show any linear improvement, but the quality of communication in the teams improved episodically. Further, the results provide evidence of the possible relationship between the improved quality of communication and the teams’ collective financial success. However, in future work, due to the lack of sensitivity of the parameters in this context together with the recent criticisms of the mathematical basis of the patterns of team dynamics based on Losada's parameters, they will be reexamined with a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: Vietnam universities have experienced remarkable changes brought about by their internationalization policies. The switch to English as a medium of instruction (EMI) for some academic programs was one of these critical changes. Literature has reported numerous issues related to EMI, including inadequate language proficiency of teaching staff. This paper looks at a qualitative research study on how a government university from Vietnam employs different strategies to enhance teachers’ English proficiency. The study reveals that the introduction of new supporting systems, assessment bodies, recruitment criteria and institutional strategies on training, monitoring and motivation have created cultural change within the teacher community. This cultural change, which includes elements such as self-directed learning, peer learning, professionalism, and ‘open-to-change’ attitudes, has been perceived by both leaders and teachers to be conducive to teachers’ language learning. The findings presented in this paper seek to contribute to the formulation or adjustment of policies related to educational reforms, such as curriculum reform, teacher recruitment and teacher professional development in non-English-speaking countries.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: Student engagement has become increasingly important in higher education in recent years. Influenced internationally by government drivers to improve student outcomes, many countries and institutions have participated in surveys such as the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) and its progeny, the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE). Findings from these surveys are used to make comparisons, for example, between disciplines within an institution, and between different institutions. The intention is positive – to generate institutional improvement. However, some researchers are raising issues with the design and use of instruments like the NSSE, particularly as it becomes dominant in countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, China and Ireland. Questions have also been raised about discipline differences in student engagement. This article reports on a study conducted in New Zealand. It draws on data from an AUSSE to answer the question: what can we learn about discipline differences in student engagement from AUSSE data in one institution? It uses analysis of variance and post hoc procedures to identify significant differences between disciplines. Findings show that: there were significant differences between disciplines on all six engagement scales; some discipline differences are influenced by assumptions in the AUSSE; findings on differences between hard and soft disciplines are both similar to and different from previous studies; AUSSE data not be compared across disciplines within an institution; and the AUSSE scales need to go beyond the current focus on measuring students’ behaviours.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, we review social cartography as a methodological approach to map and collectively engage diverse perspectives within the study of higher education. We illustrate the uses of this approach by drawing on our own experiences engaging it as part of an international research project about the effects of the convergence of globalization and economic crises in higher education. We offer several examples of how social cartography can enable agonistic collaboration amongst existing positions, as well as open up new spaces and possibilities for alternative futures in higher education.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the purpose of higher education (HE) for students in Ireland in the context of the dominant narrative of the knowledge-based economy (KBE). It argues that the KBE is one of the most recent of economic imaginaries devised by governments to manage the population [Hay, S., & Kaptizke, C. (2009). ‘Smart’ state for a knowledge economy: Reconstituting creativity through student subjectivity. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30(2), 151–164; Jessop, B. (2008). A cultural political economy of competitiveness and its implications for higher education. In B. Jessop, N. Fairdough, & R. Wodak (Eds.), Education and the knowledge-based economy in Europe (pp. 14–39). Rotterdam: Sense; Loxley, A., Seery, A., & Walsh, J. (Eds.) (2014). Higher education in Ireland: Practices, policies and possibilities. Basingtoke: Palgrave Macmillan; Rose, N. (199957. Rose, N. (1999). Governing the soul; the shaping of the private self (2nd ed.). London: Free Association Books.View all references). Governing the soul; the shaping of the private self (2nd ed.). London: Free Association Books]: HE institutions have been assigned a key role in promoting economic growth in the competitive space of the global economy. HE is also represented as an insurance against the risk of under-employment or unemployment from a student perspective. The paper examines to what extent students ‘buy’ into this official imaginary and how it affects their decision to go to college and select a particular course. The research methodology involved a large-scale survey of three major HE institutions in Ireland. Questionnaires were completed by 4265 students. The results challenged the prevailing assumption that students’ decisions to go to college or select a particular course are driven solely by economic goals. The findings indicate that while the majority of students attributed a great deal of importance to market (employment) considerations, their employment imaginary was balanced against an affective imaginary, showing high levels of concern about care relations at an individual level. Risk is not only framed in terms of securing an economic future but also securing a relational future, the risks and opportunities for care and love relationships that particular careers or jobs entail are part of students’ imaginary. HE students, especially female students, can be conceptualised as affective consumers of risk, offering a counter-narrative to the market ideology.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: Joint degree programs have gained popularity in East Asia, due to the growth of transnational higher education in the region since 2000. However, the external quality assurance (QA) and accreditation of joint degree programs is a challenge for QA agencies, as it normally involves the engagement of several institutions and multiple national accreditation procedures. The purpose of this study is to explore current QA approaches to joint degree programs in Europe and East Asia from the perspectives of QA agencies. There are four major findings from the study. First, East Asian countries tend to stipulate national regulations for a joint degree program. Second, an external QA mechanism for joint degree programs has not yet been developed in East Asian nations. Third, the adoption of international accreditation as the popular approach for joint degree programs in business fields in Asia raises the serious issue of national jurisdiction over higher education. Fourth, the European Consortium for Education's (ECA) single accreditation mode is highly recommended by QA agencies.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Higher Education Research and Development
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    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses a research project that aims to address the binary/irony of the central physical and teaching space that women casual academics inhabit within Australian universities, against their lack of presence in the existing discourses around higher education. The invisibility of women casual academics within the discourses around higher education generally, and scholarship around sessional staffing more specifically, provoked an arts-informed narrative inquiry into the lived experience of women casual academics. In this paper I offer an overview of the investigation and present extracts from a verbatim drama based on the words and worlds of women sessional staff in order to create congruency between the narrative communications of women causal academics’ lived experience, and to make a space for the acknowledgement of women casual academics and a place for their voice.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Higher Education Research and Development