Indian Journal of Agronomy

Publisher: IOS Press

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2004 Impact Factor 0.036
2003 Impact Factor 0.041
2002 Impact Factor 0.011
2001 Impact Factor 0.032
2000 Impact Factor 0.026
1999 Impact Factor 0.032
1998 Impact Factor 0.025
1997 Impact Factor 0.02

Impact factor over time

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ISSN 0537-197X

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IOS Press

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Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Indian Journal of Agronomy
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    ABSTRACT: A field experiment was conducted at Varanasi during the two consecutive pre-kharif season of 2012 and 2013 to work out the optimum levels of NPKS and Zn application for maximizing the yield, monetary return and nutrient use efficiency of baby corn. Results revealed that baby cob, baby corn and green fodder yield, economics and nutrient uptake (N, P, K, S and Zn) were recorded significantly higher with application of 125% RDF. Further, application of 50 kg S/ha resulted in significant increase of baby cob, baby corn, green fodder yield, net profit and nutrient uptake (N, P, K, S and Zn) over control but it remained at par with 25 kg S/ha. Similar trend were observed with application of zinc levels also. Increasing levels of sulphur and zinc application progressively reduced agronomic and physiological efficiency and apparent recovery of baby corn. In general, these indices were noted markedly higher with application of 25 kg S/ha and 5 kg Zn/ha over 50 kg S/ha and 10 kg Zn/ha, respectively. However, nutrient harvest index of N, P, K, S, Zn were increased gradually with application of increasing levels of NPKS and Zn. Hence, application of 125% RDF along with 50 kg S/ha and 10 kg Zn/ha was found optimum to obtain the maximum baby corn yield, net profit and nutrient use efficiency under irrigated condition of Varanasi.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Indian Journal of Agronomy
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    ABSTRACT: A field experiment was conducted during the rainy (kharif) seasons of 2010 and 2011 at Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, to evaluate the effect of nitrogen scheduling, rice–establishment methods and weed management on ‘BPT 5204’ rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar. The major group of weed species observed in the experimental field were grasses followed by broad-leaf weeds and sedges. Significant reduction in weed biomass was recorded in puddled transplanting as compared to unpuddled transplanting and in butachlor 1.50 kg/ha followed by conoweeding at 20 days after transplanting (DAT) amongst the weed-management treatments. However, in the nitrogen scheduling treatments, significantly lesser weed biomass was recorded in initial reduced dose and delayed nitrogen application (one-fourth at 10 days, half at tillering stage and one-fourth at panicle-initiation stage) than conventional scheduling of nitrogen application (half at basal, one-fourth at tillering stage and one-fourth at panicleinitiation stage). Puddled transplanting resulted in significantly more grains/panicle, panicle length, panicles/hill, grain yield (t/ha), nitrogen uptake and nitrogen-use efficiency, net returns and benefit: cost ratio than unpuddled transplanting and in butachlor 1.5 kg/ha followed by cono-weeding at 20 DAT as compared to the other weedmanagement treatments. An initial reduced dose and delayed nitrogen application (one-fourth at 10 DAT, half at tillering stage and one-fourth at panicle-initiation stage) recorded significantly higher values of yield attributes, yields, net return and benefit: cost ratio than conventional scheduling of nitrogen application.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Indian Journal of Agronomy
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    ABSTRACT: A field experiment was conducted during 2008–10 at Parbhani, to evaluate the production potential of 12 cropping systems in central plateau zone of Maharashtra. Of the 12 cropping systems, turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) + castor (Ricinus communis L.) (4:1) intercropping system gave significantly highest net profit (₹171.10 × 103/ha), economic efficiency of ₹616.9/day/ha on net monetary return (NMR) basis and soybean-equivalent yield (SEY) (10.5 t/ha), followed by soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]–onion (Allium cepa L.), which recorded the net profit of ₹125.2 × 103, economic efficiency of ₹536.4/day/ha, soybean-equivalent yield of 8.2 t/ha, and Bt. cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)–wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.) emend. Fiori & Paol]–coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) (SEY 8.5 t/ha). Among the cropping sequences, maize (Zea mays L.)–chickpea (Cicer arientinum L.)–okra (Abelomoschus esculentus L) recorded the highest land-use efficiency (83.6%) followed by maize–wheat– greengram (83.4%), Bt cotton–wheat–coriander (81.7%) and turmeric + castor intercropping system (75.9%). The lowest land-use efficiency was recorded in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]–wheat sequence (62.1%). The highest benefit: cost ratio was recorded in turmeric + castor (4:1 ratio) intercropping system (3.8), followed by pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.]–groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) (3.7). The employment generation was the highest (317 man-days/ha/year) in maize–chickpea–okra system, followed by Bt cotton–wheat–coriander (289 man-days/ha/year). The turmeric + castor intercropping system (4:1) recorded the lowest employment generation (136 man-days/ha/year). The highest consumptive use of water (140.2 cm) and water-use efficiency (56 kg/ha-cm) were recorded in maize–wheat–greengram cropping sequence, followed by Bt cotton–wheat–coriander cropping sequence. The highest soil-nutrient status was maintained in pigeonpea–groundnut cropping system, followed by cotton–summer groundnut.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Indian Journal of Agronomy
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    ABSTRACT: The field experiments were conducted over 2 consecutive rainy (kharif) (July to November) seasons of 2013 and 2014 at New Delhi, to evaluate the effect of 3 sulphur (S) levels (0, 20 and 40 kg S/ha), 4 zinc (Zn) levels (0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 kg Zn/ha) and 2 zinc bio-fertilizer (Native zinc solubilizer) levels (Control and seed treatment with zinc bio-fertilizer) on the performance of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.). Sandy loam soil of the experimental field was low in available S and DTPA-extractable Zn. Application of S caused marked improvement in plant height, branches/plant, leaf area index (LAI), pods/plant and pod and haulms yields, net returns, S-content in kernel and S and Zn-uptake up to 40 kg S/ha. Based on 2 years average, application of 20 and 40 kg S/ha resulted in 23.4 and 31.4% increase in pod yield, 36.3 and 52.7% in haulms yield, 46.3 and 56.7% in net returns, 66.3 and 92.3% in S-uptake in kernel and 25.9 and 35.3 % in Zn-uptake/ha in kernel over control, respectively. Application of Zn had significant effect on growth and yield attributes, pod and haulms yields, shelling percentage, net returns and Zn-content and uptake in kernel only up to 5.0 kg Zn/ha. Application of 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 kg Zn/ha resulted in 17.2, 21.1 and 13.6 % increase in pod yield, 36.1, 45.0 and 27.4% in net returns, 17.5, 18.5 and 6.3% in S-uptake and 29.4, 44.9 and 45.5% in Zn-uptake in kernel over control, respectively. Effect of Zn-bio-fertilizer was significant on growth and yield attributes (except kernels/pod), pod and haulms yields, shelling percentage and Zn-content and uptake. Due to application of Zn bio-fertilizer 4.7, 6.2, 9.2, 5.2 and 7.9% increase in pod yield, haulms yield, net returns, S-uptake in kernel and Zn-uptake in kernel was recorded over control. Based on two years average, response to S and Zn application was quadratic and economic optimum dose was worked out to be 39.0 and 4.5kg/ha, respectively. Hence application of 39kg S and 4.5 kg Zn/ha with Zn-solubilizer is recommended for improving the productivity and profitability of groundnut in sandy loam soils low in S and Zn.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Indian Journal of Agronomy
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    ABSTRACT: A field experiment was conducted during 2007–08 at Nagla, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand, to find out effect of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on growth, productivity and quality of sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolar (L.) Moench] forage crop. The experiment was laid out in a randomized block design consisting total 12 treatments with 4 replications. Treatments comprised control, recommended dose of NPK through inorganic source and different combinations of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients. Application of 75% dose of recommended nitrogen through inorganic sources + 25% through vermicompost significantly improved the growth, productivity and fodder quality over the control. The highest total green fodder yield (52.8 t/ha), dry-matter yield (13.5 t/ha), total crude protein yield (0.92 t/ha), digestible dry-matter yield (6.6 t/ha), juice yield (9,910 kilo litre/ha), sugar yield (0.91 t/ha) and calculated ethanol yield (2,762 kilo litre/ha) was recorded with application of 75% recommended dose of N through inorganic sources + 25% through vermicompost during both the years. Fodder quality parameters like juice percentage (26.2), dry-matter content (25.6%), digestibility (48.7%) and neutral detergent fibre content (61%) were also highest with this treatment. Available nitrogen and phosphorus content did not vary significantly at harvesting of crop due to different treatments.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Indian Journal of Agronomy
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    ABSTRACT: Farming with natural rocks and minerals was an age-old practice. Intensive agriculture with imbalanced fertilizer usage has led to a decline in soil quality and so, restoring this soil degradation needs urgent attention. In this context, farming with natural minerals (zeolites) has drawn attention. Zeolites are natural aluminosilicates present as rocks in different parts of the world. However, they are also inherently present in Vertisols mixed with soils. Exclusive use of zeolites has gained a new momentum in the recent past owing to multitude of benefits accrued from them. Japanese farmers were pioneering workers on zeolite usage to manage soil moisture and reaction. Their ion-exchange capacity is helpful for plant nutrition as well as soil amendment; besides the recent research on zeolite-herbicides interactions is encouraging. Although considerable research on zeolites in agriculture has been advanced, further research need to be carried out for their efficient utilization in farming.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Indian Journal of Agronomy
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    ABSTRACT: In order to evaluate the best management practices i.e. mulching, liming and farm yard manures for maximizing the productivity, profitability, nutrient uptake and quality on winter maize, a field experiment was conducted during the two consecutive rabi season of 2010-11 and 2011-12 at Agricultural Research farm of ICAR, RC for NEH Region, Nagaland Centre Jharnapani, Medziphema.Experiment was laid out in a split-split plot design having 24 treatment combinations of mulching and lime along with farm yard manures and replicated thrice. Results revealed that application of straw mulches significantly increased all the growth and yield attributes, grain yield, protein content and nutrient uptake by maize. Among the levels of lime, higher grain yield (3.91 t/ha) and stover yield (4.24 t/ha) were noted with application of lime @ 0.6 t/ha. Similarly, significantly higher grain (3.79 t/ha) and stover yield (4.17 t/ha), nutrient uptake, protein yield were recorded with application of farm yard manures @ 12 t/ha. Application of straw mulch along with 0.6 t/ha lime and FYM @ 12 t/ha was recorded markedly higher total rainfall and effective rainfall use efficiency. Hence, straw mulching applied with 0.6 t/ha furrows lime and 12 t FYM/ha should be adopted to obtain the maximum grain yield, net profit and nutrient uptake by winter maize.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Indian Journal of Agronomy
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    ABSTRACT: A field experiment was conducted in randomized block design during the rainy (kharif) season of 2012 at Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh to study the effect of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on soil quality and productivityof rice (Oryza sativa L.). The highest grain and straw yields (5.03 and 7.18 t/ha) were recorded under the treatments 100% recommended dose of fertilizer (RDF) + S-Zn-B and 75% RDF + 25% N through sewage sludge, respectively. Application of S (40 kg/ha), Zn (5 kg/ha) and B (1.5 kg/ha) along with NPK (120:60:60) in rice increased plant height, tiller number, grain yield and 1,000-grian weight 22, 99, 62 and 22%, respectively, over the control, but did not show any significant increase in these parameters over 100% RDF. Initial trends indicated that application of Sesbania perhaps increased N, P, B and Zn in soil while inorganic S, B and Zn fertilizers had residual effect in post-harvest soil.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Indian Journal of Agronomy