British Journal of Guidance and Counselling (BRIT J GUID COUNS)

Publisher: Careers Research and Advisory Centre (Cambridge, England), Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

British Journal of Guidance & Counselling is the leading forum for debate between academics, trainers and practitioners in the field, publishing high-quality, international contributions in the following areas: the theory and practice of guidance and counselling the provision of guidance and counselling services training and professional issues Theoretical and empirical studies relating to the practice of guidance and counselling are reported, drawing on a variety of disciplines, encompassing both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and ranging in scope from large-scale surveys to individual case-studies. The journal also explores the links between various areas of guidance and counselling and their relationship to such cognate fields as education, psychotherapy and social work. In addition to regular papers, the journal features special articles under the headings 'A Personal View', 'Interview', 'In Practice' and 'Debate', along with book reviews and frequent Symposia focusing on areas of particular interest. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling is published on behalf of the Careers Research and Advisory Centre.

Current impact factor: 0.75

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.396

Additional details

5-year impact 0.75
Cited half-life 7.50
Immediacy index 0.18
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.23
Website British Journal of Guidance and Counselling website
Other titles British journal of guidance & counselling (Online), British journal of guidance and counselling, British journal of guidance and counseling
ISSN 0306-9885
OCLC 43770214
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The study aimed to identify the level of suicidal ideation in early attrition clients and their reasons for the early termination of their therapy. The cross-sectional design involved early attrition clients (CA) who withdrew from therapy before their second session (n = 61), and continuing clients who (CC) progressed beyond their second session (n = 73). All completed the Suicidal Behaviours Questionnaire-Revised scale, and the CA group also completed the Reasons for Terminating Therapy Scale. Clients were significantly more likely to disengage if they were self-referred, had no health-care support or had lower suicidal ideation. The study identifies the significant role of suicidal ideation and referral source in therapy retention and the implications this has for therapists and counsellors.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: This study provides a better understanding of using visual arts in counselling adults with depressive disorders. Three in-depth case studies were conducted in the counselling unit of a mental health hospital in Malaysia. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were applied to explore three adult participants’ counselling experiences. They attended six individual counselling sessions, which included four art-making activities, and two after-session interviews, for approximately two months. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data. The findings showed that through the therapeutic use of visual arts, the participants were able to explore and express various emotions, face their problems, communicate better with themselves and the counsellor, achieve a deeper self-understanding, and make meaningful progress in counselling, even though some of them experienced a sense of uncertainty at the beginning of some art-making activities.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: The present study is the first study undertaken in Australia that seeks to explore practitioners’ perspectives on the use of clinical supervision in their therapeutic engagement with asylum seekers and refugees. We used thematic analysis to analyse extracts of interviews that were conducted with nine professionals who worked therapeutically with asylum seekers and refugees and had experience of participating in individual and peer supervision. The findings of the study suggest that supervision encouraged practitioners to develop multicultural awareness and explore therapeutic ways of working that are compatible with their clients’ frame. In addition, supervision provided the context in which practitioners explored the impact of the asylum legislative framework on their clinical work and reflected upon their feelings of powerlessness and political impotence. Implications for practice that derive from supervisory needs of practitioners who work with asylum seekers and refugees are explored.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: This article introduces a method to critical reviews and explores the ways in which problems have been formulated in knowledge production on career guidance in Denmark over a 10-year period from 2004 to 2014. The method draws upon the work of Bacchi focussing on the ‘What's the problem represented to be’ (WPR) approach. Forty-nine empirical studies on Danish youth career guidance were included in the study. An analysis of the issues in focus resulted in nine problem categories. One of these, ‘targeting’, is analysed using the WPR approach. Finally, the article concludes that the WPR approach provides a constructive basis for a critical analysis and discussion of the collective empirical knowledge production on career guidance, stimulating awareness of problems and potential solutions among the career guidance community.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: University support services can be a beneficial resource for students coping with personal stressors. This study investigated the predictors of service use by undergraduate students during their first year at university. Participants completed self-report measures of problem-solving effectiveness, psychological distress and perceived social support (availability and satisfaction) at the start of the academic year, frequency of exposure to stressors half-way through the first semester and support service use at the end of the first and second semesters. Perceived availability of social support and frequency of exposure to stressors predicted service use. Additional analyses examined change in psychological distress across the first semester. Implications of these findings are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: This work aimed to evaluate the short-term effectiveness of psychotherapy delivered at the counselling service of the University of Bologna (Italy), by means of a single group longitudinal study including a 6-months follow-up. To this end, sixty-six students completed the 6-months follow-up and filled in the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) three times, during the first and the last session of the psychotherapy, and 6 months after its conclusion. The majority of students presented a problem concerning mood (n = 35; 53.03%); students completed a programme of psychodynamic therapy (n = 38, 57.58%) or cognitive-behavioural therapy (n = 28, 42.42%). With reference to 10 out of 12 SQ dimensions, significant improvements were observed both after therapy and at the 6-months follow-up, in comparison to pre-treatment; furthermore no significant differences were observed between the end of psychotherapy and the follow-up. The present data indicate the effectiveness of the therapy in reducing students’ distress at the end of treatment and also in the short-term.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to validate a Chinese version of the Gratitude Resentment and Appreciation Test (GRAT) with Taiwanese students. In Study 1, a total of 2511 Taiwanese students participated and completed the translated GRAT. Exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and reliability analysis were undertaken to assess the psychometric quality of the GRAT and its factor structure. In Study 2, a total of 1260 students were used to validate the revised questionnaire. Results supported the proposed factor structure of the measure and the scores of all subscales showed strong internal reliabilities. These findings therefore validate the psychometric properties of the proposed Chinese version of the GRAT.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: Offering counselling to students is increasingly considered as a key academic service. However, the reduction of resources allocated to Italian universities emphasises the need to assess the quality of interventions. This paper presents data reporting the effectiveness of a university counselling service. A sample of 45 undergraduate students completed a cognitive-relational intervention at a counselling service in a University in the North of Italy. The project focused on the development of reappraisal skills and problem-solving strategies to manage difficult situations. The results showed a significant pre and post-intervention reduction in self-reported psychopathological symptoms (measured with Symptoms Check List 90-Revised) as well as in general levels of distress (measured with Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure). A significant increase in reappraisal levels, measured with the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, was observed, which is a focal element of the counselling intervention. There were no detectable changes in the level of suppression.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: Working with suicidal clients is perceived to be demanding and anxiety provoking for psychotherapists. This investigation explores what it is like for psychotherapists who work with suicidal clients, particularly as within the prevailing culture there is an increasing focus on strategies aimed at suicide prevention. Five themes were identified through narrative analysis, with support systems such as supervision and peer support being seen as vital in surviving working with suicidal clients. However, there is also ambivalence about involving other professionals, such as mental health services, as there is a sense that to do so may be anti-therapeutic and unhelpful to the client. Overall, what emerges from this study is that it is important to challenge the prevailing culture in which a medical discourse is dominant, in order to find a different way of talking about suicide and despair.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: In their article, Lang and Gardiner draw support from the Treaty of Waitangi to deconstruct cultural dominance and reconstruct a framework, which promotes bicultural pluralism in the new counsellor education programme at the Massey University. However, they omit significant details of the Treaty and therefore mislead the audience to think that the Treaty has always served its purpose to protect Māori and the colonisers all the time. They develop a new counselling framework ‘ARC = Attend Reflect Collaborate’ which merely describes what has happened or what should have happened in counselling. It fails to address the need to raise a counsellor's awareness of his or her own cultural identity and understanding of the worldview of a culturally different client before counselling starts.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling
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    ABSTRACT: The present study considered the relationships between alexithymia and Machiavellian personality beliefs among university students. Two hundred and thirteen students (95 women and 118 men) studying Master's degrees in psychology, education, law, political sciences, and social sciences at the University of Tehran were randomly chosen using multi-stage clustering sampling and screening. Participants completed the Kiddie Mach scale and Toronto Alexithymia scale (Persian version). Data were analysed by Pearson's correlation coefficient and multivariate regression. Results revealed a significant correlation between alexithymia and Machiavellian views. According to these findings, students with Machiavellian beliefs seemed to run into difficulty with the identification and description of others' emotions.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · British Journal of Guidance and Counselling