Nucleic Acids Research (NUCLEIC ACIDS RES)

Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)

Journal description

Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) publishes the results of leading edge research into physical, chemical, biochemical and biological aspects of nucleic acids and proteins involved in nucleic acid metabolism and/or interactions. It enables the rapid publication of papers under the following categories: RNA, molecular biology, chemistry, genomics, computational biology and structural biology. A Survey and Summary section provides a format for brief reviews. The first issue of each year is devoted to biological databases.

Current impact factor: 9.11

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 9.112
2013 Impact Factor 8.808
2012 Impact Factor 8.278
2011 Impact Factor 8.026
2010 Impact Factor 7.836
2009 Impact Factor 7.479
2008 Impact Factor 6.878
2007 Impact Factor 6.954
2006 Impact Factor 6.317
2005 Impact Factor 7.552
2004 Impact Factor 7.26
2003 Impact Factor 6.575
2002 Impact Factor 7.051
2001 Impact Factor 6.373
2000 Impact Factor 5.396
1999 Impact Factor 5.748
1998 Impact Factor 4.878
1997 Impact Factor 4.188
1996 Impact Factor 4.488
1995 Impact Factor 4.235
1994 Impact Factor 4.097
1993 Impact Factor 3.783
1992 Impact Factor 3.294

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 8.87
Cited half-life 7.40
Immediacy index 2.33
Eigenfactor 0.34
Article influence 3.49
Website Nucleic Acids Research website
Other titles Nucleic acids research
ISSN 0305-1048
OCLC 1791693
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Oxford University Press (OUP)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Creative Commons Attribution License or Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License available
    • Pre-print on author's personal website, employers website or subject repository
    • Pre-print can only be posted prior to acceptance
    • Pre-print must be accompanied by set statement (see link)
    • Pre-print must not be replaced with post-print, instead a link to published version with amended set statement should be made
    • Publisher's version/PDF must be used
    • Publisher's version/PDF on institutional repository or centrally organised repositories
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany archived copy (see policy)
    • Eligible authors may deposit in OpenDepot
    • Publisher will deposit on behalf of NIH, HHMI, UK MRC, Telethon and Wellcome Trust funded authors to PubMed Central and Europe PMC
    • All titles are open access journals
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Oxford University Press (OUP)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • Jana Ognjenović · Jiang Wu · Doreen Matthies · Ulrich Baxa · Sriram Subramaniam · Jiqiang Ling · Miljan Simonović

    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
  • Daniel Capurso · Henrik Bengtsson · Mark R. Segal

    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Most RNAs generated by the human genome have no protein-coding ability and are termed non-coding RNAs. Among these include circular RNAs, which include exonic circular RNAs (circRNA), mainly found in the cytoplasm, and intronic RNAs (ciRNA), predominantly detected in the nucleus. The biological functions of circular RNAs remain largely unknown, although ciRNAs have been reported to promote gene transcription, while circRNAs may function as microRNA sponges. We demonstrate that the circular RNA circ-Foxo3 was highly expressed in non-cancer cells and were associated with cell cycle progression. Silencing endogenous circ-Foxo3 promoted cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of circ-Foxo3 repressed cell cycle progression by binding to the cell cycle proteins cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (also known as cell division protein kinase 2 or CDK2) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (or p21), resulting in the formation of a ternary complex. Normally, CDK2 interacts with cyclin A and cyclin E to facilitate cell cycle entry, while p21works to inhibit these interactions and arrest cell cycle progression. The formation of this circ-Foxo3-p21-CDK2 ternary complex arrested the function of CDK2 and blocked cell cycle progression.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Timely turnover of RNA is an important element in the control of bacterial gene expression, but relatively few specific targets of RNA turnover regulation are known. Deletion of the Bacillus subtilis pnpA gene, encoding the major 3′ exonuclease turnover enzyme, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), was shown previously to cause a motility defect correlated with a reduced level of the 32-gene fla/che flagellar biosynthesis operon transcript. fla/che operon transcript abundance has been shown to be inhibited by an excess of the small regulatory protein, SlrA, and here we find that slrA mRNA accumulated in the pnpA-deletion mutant. Mutation of slrA was epistatic to mutation of pnpA for the motility-related phenotype. Further, Rho-dependent termination was required for PNPase turnover of slrA mRNA. When the slrA gene was provided with a Rho-independent transcription terminator, gene regulation was no longer PNPase-dependent. Thus we show that the slrA transcript is a direct target of PNPase and that regulation of RNA turnover is a major determinant of motility gene expression. The interplay of specific transcription termination and mRNA decay mechanisms suggests selection for fine-tuning of gene expression.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Recent work revealed a new class of molecular machines called molecular sleds, which are small basic molecules that bind and slide along DNA with the ability to carry cargo along DNA. Here, we performed biochemical and single-molecule flow stretching assays to investigate the basis of sliding activity in molecular sleds. In particular, we identified the functional core of pVIc, the first molecular sled characterized; peptide functional groups that control sliding activity; and propose a model for the sliding activity of molecular sleds. We also observed widespread DNA binding and sliding activity among basic polypeptide sequences that implicate mammalian nuclear localization sequences and many cell penetrating peptides as molecular sleds. These basic protein motifs exhibit weak but physiologically relevant sequence-nonspecific DNA affinity. Our findings indicate that many mammalian proteins contain molecular sled sequences and suggest the possibility that substantial undiscovered sliding activity exists among nuclear mammalian proteins.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Escherichia coli DNA ligase (EcoLigA) repairs 3′-OH/5′-PO4 nicks in duplex DNA via reaction of LigA with NAD+ to form a covalent LigA-(lysyl-Nζ)–AMP intermediate (step 1); transfer of AMP to the nick 5′-PO4 to form an AppDNA intermediate (step 2); and attack of the nick 3′-OH on AppDNA to form a 3′-5′ phosphodiester (step 3). A distinctive feature of EcoLigA is its stimulation by ammonium ion. Here we used rapid mix-quench methods to analyze the kinetic mechanism of single-turnover nick sealing by EcoLigA–AMP. For substrates with correctly base-paired 3′-OH/5′-PO4 nicks, kstep2 was fast (6.8–27 s−1) and similar to kstep3 (8.3–42 s−1). Absent ammonium, kstep2 and kstep3 were 48-fold and 16-fold slower, respectively. EcoLigA was exquisitely sensitive to 3′-OH base mispairs and 3′ N:abasic lesions, which elicited 1000- to >20000-fold decrements in kstep2. The exception was the non-canonical 3′ A:oxoG configuration, which EcoLigA accepted as correctly paired for rapid sealing. These results underscore: (i) how EcoLigA requires proper positioning of the nick 3′ nucleoside for catalysis of 5′ adenylylation; and (ii) EcoLigA's potential to embed mutations during the repair of oxidative damage. EcoLigA was relatively tolerant of 5′-phosphate base mispairs and 5′ N:abasic lesions.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes. Many telomere-binding proteins bind to telomeric repeat sequences and further generate T-loops in animals. However, it is not clear if they regulate telomere organization using epigenetic mechanisms and how the epigenetic molecules are involved in regulating the telomeres. Here, we show direct interactions between the telomere-binding protein, AtTRB2 and histone deacetylases, HDT4 and HDA6, in vitro and in vivo. AtTRB2 mediates the associations of HDT4 and HDA6 with telomeric repeats. Telomere elongation is found in AtTRB2, HDT4 and HDA6 mutants over generations, but also in met1 and cmt3 DNA methyltransferases mutants. We also characterized HDT4 as an Arabidopsis H3K27 histone deacetylase. HDT4 binds to acetylated peptides at residue K27 of histone H3 in vitro, and deacetylates this residue in vivo. Our results suggest that AtTRB2 also has a role in the regulation of telomeric chromatin as a possible scaffold protein for recruiting the epigenetic regulators in Arabidopsis, in addition to its telomere binding and length regulation activity. Our data provide evidences that epigenetic molecules associate with telomeres by direct physical interaction with telomere-binding proteins and further regulate homeostasis of telomeres in Arabidopsis thaliana.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: RNase II, a 3′ to 5′ processive exoribonuclease, is the major hydrolytic enzyme in Escherichia coli accounting for ∼90% of the total activity. Despite its importance, little is actually known about regulation of this enzyme. We show here that one residue, Lys501, is acetylated in RNase II. This modification, reversibly controlled by the acetyltransferase Pka, and the deacetylase CobB, affects binding of the substrate and thus decreases the catalytic activity of RNase II. As a consequence, the steady-state level of target RNAs of RNase II may be altered in the cells. We also find that under conditions of slowed growth, the acetylation level of RNase II is elevated and the activity of RNase II decreases, emphasizing the importance of this regulatory process. These findings indicate that acetylation can regulate the activity of a bacterial ribonuclease.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Visualization of chromosomal dynamics is important for understanding many fundamental intra-nuclear processes. Efficient and reliable live-cell multicolor labeling of chromosomal loci can realize this goal. However, the current methods are constrained mainly by insufficient labeling throughput, efficiency, flexibility as well as photostability. Here we have developed a new approach to realize dual-color chromosomal loci imaging based on a modified single-guide RNA (sgRNA) of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. The modification of sgRNA was optimized by structure-guided engineering of the original sgRNA, consisting of RNA aptamer insertions that bind fluorescent protein-tagged effectors. By labeling and tracking telomeres, centromeres and genomic loci, we demonstrate that the new approach is easy to implement and enables robust dual-color imaging of genomic elements. Importantly, our data also indicate that the fast exchange rate of RNA aptamer binding effectors makes our sgRNA-based labeling method much more tolerant to photobleaching than the Cas9-based labeling method. This is crucial for continuous, long-term tracking of chromosomal dynamics. Lastly, as our method is complementary to other live-cell genomic labeling systems, it is therefore possible to combine them into a plentiful palette for the study of native chromatin organization and genome ultrastructure dynamics in living cells.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Insertion of microRNA target sequences into the flavivirus genome results in selective tissue-specific attenuation and host-range restriction of live attenuated vaccine viruses. However, previous strategies for miRNA-targeting did not incorporate a mechanism to prevent target elimination under miRNA-mediated selective pressure, restricting their use in vaccine development. To overcome this limitation, we developed a new approach for miRNA-targeting of tick-borne flavivirus (Langat virus, LGTV) in the duplicated capsid gene region (DCGR). Genetic stability of viruses with DCGR was ensured by the presence of multiple cis-acting elements within the N-terminal capsid coding region, including the stem-loop structure (5′SL6) at the 3′ end of the promoter. We found that the 5′SL6 functions as a structural scaffold for the conserved hexanucleotide motif at its tip and engages in a complementary interaction with the region present in the 3′ NCR to enhance viral RNA replication. The resulting kissing-loop interaction, common in tick-borne flaviviruses, supports a single pair of cyclization elements (CYC) and functions as a homolog of the second pair of CYC that is present in the majority of mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Placing miRNA targets into the DCGR results in superior attenuation of LGTV in the CNS and does not interfere with development of protective immunity in immunized mice.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as regulators of gene expression across metazoa. Interestingly, some lncRNAs function independently of their transcripts – the transcription of the lncRNA locus itself affects target genes. However, current methods of loss-of-function analysis are insufficient to address the role of lncRNA transcription from the transcript which has impeded analysis of their function. Using the minimal CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system, we show that coexpression of the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) and guide RNAs targeting the endogenous roX locus in the Drosophila cells results in a robust and specific knockdown of roX1 and roX2 RNAs, thus eliminating the need for recruiting chromatin modifying proteins for effective gene silencing. Additionally, we find that the human and Drosophila codon optimized dCas9 genes are functional and show similar transcription repressive activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the minimal CRISPRi system suppresses roX transcription efficiently in vivo resulting in loss-of-function phenotype, thus validating the method for the first time in a multicelluar organism. Our analysis expands the genetic toolkit available for interrogating lncRNA function in situ and is adaptable for targeting multiple genes across model organisms.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: CRISPR/Cas9-induced site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways. Extensive efforts have been made to knock-in exogenous DNA to a selected genomic locus in human cells; which, however, has focused on HDR-based strategies and was proven inefficient. Here, we report that NHEJ pathway mediates efficient rejoining of genome and plasmids following CRISPR/Cas9-induced DNA DSBs, and promotes high-efficiency DNA integration in various human cell types. With this homology-independent knock-in strategy, integration of a 4.6 kb promoterless ires-eGFP fragment into the GAPDH locus yielded up to 20% GFP+ cells in somatic LO2 cells, and 1.70% GFP+ cells in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Quantitative comparison further demonstrated that the NHEJ-based knock-in is more efficient than HDR-mediated gene targeting in all human cell types examined. These data support that CRISPR/Cas9-induced NHEJ provides a valuable new path for efficient genome editing in human ESCs and somatic cells.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: The exosome plays an important role in RNA degradation and processing. In archaea, three Rrp41:Rrp42 heterodimers assemble into a barrel like structure that contains a narrow RNA entrance pore and a lumen that contains three active sites. Here, we demonstrate that this quaternary structure of the exosome is important for efficient RNA degradation. We find that the entrance pore of the barrel is required for nM substrate affinity. This strong interaction is crucial for processive substrate degradation and prevents premature release of the RNA from the enzyme. Using methyl TROSY NMR techniques, we establish that the 3′ end of the substrate remains highly flexible inside the lumen. As a result, the RNA jumps between the three active sites that all equally participate in substrate degradation. The RNA jumping rate is, however, much faster than the cleavage rate, indicating that not all active site:substrate encounters result in catalysis. Enzymatic turnover therefore benefits from the confinement of the active sites and substrate in the lumen, which ensures that the RNA is at all times bound to one of the active sites. The evolution of the exosome into a hexameric complex and the optimization of its catalytic efficiency were thus likely co-occurring events.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Lignin-derived (e.g. phenolic) compounds can compromise the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity and recalcitrance. The lipid-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus PD630 has recently emerged as a promising microbial host for lignocellulose conversion to value-added products due to its natural ability to tolerate and utilize phenolics. To gain a better understanding of its phenolic tolerance and utilization mechanisms, we adaptively evolved R. opacus over 40 passages using phenol as its sole carbon source (up to 373% growth improvement over wild-type), and extensively characterized two strains from passages 33 and 40. The two adapted strains showed higher phenol consumption rates (∼20 mg/l/h) and ∼2-fold higher lipid production from phenol than the wild-type strain. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative transcriptomics identified highly-upregulated degradation pathways and putative transporters for phenol in both adapted strains, highlighting the important linkage between mechanisms of regulated phenol uptake, utilization, and evolved tolerance. Our study shows that the R. opacus mutants are likely to use their transporters to import phenol rather than export them, suggesting a new aromatic tolerance mechanism. The identified tolerance genes and pathways are promising candidates for future metabolic engineering in R. opacus for improved lignin conversion to lipid-based products.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies show that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) function in coordination with each other to control post-transcriptional regulation (PTR). Despite this, the majority of research to date has focused on the regulatory effect of individual RBPs or miRNAs. Here, we mapped both RBP and miRNA binding sites on human 3′UTRs and utilized this collection to better understand PTR. We show that the transcripts that lack competition for HuR binding are destabilized more after HuR depletion. We also confirm this finding for PUM1(2) by measuring genome-wide expression changes following the knockdown of PUM1(2) in HEK293 cells. Next, to find potential cooperative interactions, we identified the pairs of factors whose sites co-localize more often than expected by random chance. Upon examining these results for PUM1(2), we found that transcripts where the sites of PUM1(2) and its interacting miRNA form a stem-loop are more stabilized upon PUM1(2) depletion. Finally, using dinucleotide frequency and counts of regulatory sites as features in a regression model, we achieved an AU-ROC of 0.86 in predicting mRNA half-life in BEAS-2B cells. Altogether, our results suggest that future studies of PTR must consider the combined effects of RBPs and miRNAs, as well as their interactions.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Nucleic Acids Research