Early Child Development and Care (Early Child Dev Care)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

Early Child Development and Care is a multidisciplinary publication that serves psychologists, educators, psychiatrists, pediatricians, social workers and other professionals who deal with research, planning, education and care of infants and young children. The periodical provides English translations of work in this field that has been published in other languages, and original English papers on all aspects of early child development and care: descriptive and evaluative articles on social, educational and preventive medical programs for young children, experimental and observational studies, critical reviews and summary articles. In addition, to scientific papers, the periodical will contain book reviews, reports on conferences and other items of interest.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
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Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Early Child Development and Care website
Other titles Early child development and care, ECDC, E.C.D.C., International monograph series on early child care
ISSN 0300-4430
OCLC 1772625
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
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    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined differences in classroom quality, assessed by the Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ITERS-R), in 287 infant and 479 toddler classrooms. Classroom quality was compared across classroom age group (infant compared to toddler classrooms) as well as across programme type (for-profit compared to not-for-profit programmes). Classroom quality was assessed using four ITERS-R factors identified in previous research, including Materials/Activities, Safety/Organization, Language/Interactions, and Parents/Staff factor scores. Results indicate that infant classrooms scored higher on the Safety/Organization and Language/Interactions factors than toddler classrooms, and toddler classrooms scored higher on Materials/Activities than infant classrooms. Classrooms in not-for-profit programmes scored higher on Safety/Organization and Parents/Staff factors. Differences in Safety/Organization, Language/Interactions, and Parents/Staff factor scores were found based on teachers’ education, and teachers’ experience in the programme was positively related to scores on the Language/Interactions factor. Implications regarding the provision of high-quality classroom environments for infants and toddlers in both programme types are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: This study addresses the relationships between teachers and children (four to six years old) with difficulties in self-regulation from the parent's point of view. Narratives were constructed in 21 interviews with parents of children who have difficulties in self-regulation. The study focused on two questions: (i) What kinds of teacher–child relationships can be identified in the parents’ narratives? and (ii) How is the child positioned in this relational context? The teacher–child relationships found were labelled neutral, problematic and caring. Within these categories, the child was positioned in nine ways ranging from the child as troublesome to the child as unique. The study offers tools for analysing the teacher–child relationship. It helps to understand this relationship from the parental point of view, thereby contributing to the objective of supporting the development and well-being of children in the early childhood education context in cooperation with their parents.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study was to shed light on (1) what Hungarian mothers, fathers and teachers of 4–6-year-olds think of these children's social problem-solving (SPS) and their difficulties in terms of problem-solving, adaptability and prosocial behaviour; (2) studying any correlation between the examined aspects and (3) the connection between one's opinion about SPS and some family background variables. We used three questionnaires (a modified version of SPSI-R [D'Zurilla, T. J., Nezu, A., & Maydeu-Olivares, A. (2002). Social problem-solving inventory–revised (SPSI–R): Technical manual. New York, NY: Multi-Health Systems, North Tonawanda]; Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire, [Goodman, R. (2001). Psychometric properties of the strength and difficulty questionnaire. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric, 40(11), 1337–1345]; Conners Parent/Teacher Rating Scale-Revised, [Conners, C. K. (1997). Parent rating scale–revised technical manual. New York, NY: Multi Health Systems, North Tonawanda]) and a background questionnaire in our research. Parents and teachers have different opinions in almost all studied aspects (e.g. positive and negative approach to SPS) and there is also a difference between how mothers and fathers rated most of the factors. Contrary to previous international research in the field, it is not teachers who have the most negative opinion but fathers.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: Many of the >339,000 international adoptees arriving in the USA during the last 25 years are now teenagers and young adults (YA). Information about their long-term social integration, school performance, and self-esteem is incomplete. Moreover, the relation of these outcomes to facets of family function is incompletely understood. We hypothesised that growth, development, and health at arrival would predict the social and academic success of YA adoptees, and that family flexibility would correlate with more favourable outcomes for family and teen. Arrival records of 88 international adoptees aged 15–25 years were reviewed. Adoptees and their parents completed a series of standardised questionnaires. Results showed that self-esteem was good, although 15% were anxious or unhappy. Family stress varied widely and was higher for families with adopted sons. Adoption satisfaction varied, and correlated to family coping skills, inversely to family stress, but not to age, development, behaviour, growth at arrival, gender, or to parental experience. Generally, family flexibility corresponded to more favourable outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: A content analysis of the coverage of the major approaches to early childhood education in the early childhood research journals, published between 2010 and 2014, that are early childhood research oriented and have free online access were investigated. Among 21 journals in early childhood education, two journals were selected for the content analysis of the major approaches to early childhood education: Early Childhood Research and Practice and International Research in Early Childhood Education. These early childhood journals are the only journals that are fully online and available for free. The results showed that Head Start was the most frequently used approach that appeared in these journals followed by Reggio Emilia. The theory of Internet Information Gatekeepers guided this current research's theoretical framework. A brief overview of each approach was provided along with the significance of the study. Concerns about the ways approaches were mentioned in the studies were discussed.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: Current research exists regarding the play behaviour of students in various settings and with varying abilities. Regardless, there needs to be improved understanding of how students’ play behaviour is affected when their classroom environment is significantly redesigned. This study examined, over a 21-week period between December 2013 and May 2014, the play behaviour among five-year-old children attending a nursery school from the perspective of how their play behaviour is affected by the classroom environment. Data were collected through observations of students' play behaviour before and after an extensive classroom redesign. Analysis of the observation data determined that manipulative play behaviours were the lengthiest and along with dramatic play appeared to be the most preferred. The research findings suggested that positive changes occurred in children's play behaviour following the classroom redesign. The findings also reinforced the idea that redesign of a classroom environment is likely to contribute to children's psychosocial and psychomotor development, as long as the play settings are designed to meet children's needs and interests. Proper redesign of the classroom environment can support students through their developmental stages and aid them in better reaching their potential.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reviews previous literature about peer acceptance and friendship, two of the most critical aspects of peer relations that have received most of research attention during the past years. In this review, we will focus on the processes explaining the way children use the ability to socialise with peers; explore the hypothesis that certain aspects may interact with peer acceptance and friendship, that is, behavioural, psychological, and physical; and finally, indicate on which terms peer acceptance and friendship are interconnected. Those data may constitute a concrete base upon which peer acceptance and friendship need to be investigated separately when measuring peer competence. Pedagogical implications will also be highlighted as a guidance for parents, teachers, and others who work with young children to design effective prosocial activities.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: This mixed methods study focused on the socialization goals for preschool-aged children among parents from three small-sized cities located in northeastern China. A total of 154 parents with preschool-aged children completed questionnaires measuring parental socialization goals for children's social-emotional competence and academic achievement. Quantitative results showed that parents generally placed more importance on children's social-emotional skills than academic skills. Ten mothers were selected from the sample and participated in a semi-structured qualitative interview to help understand reasons for parents’ prioritization of social-emotional well-being over academic performance. Four themes emerged, including parents’ concerns about children's psychological well-being under excessive academic pressure, their desires to ‘protect’ children's childhood, their awareness of children's individual differences in intelligence and talent in learning, and their belief that good grades did not guarantee future success in life. Our findings highlight the importance of using mixed methods to deepen understanding of contemporary Chinese parents’ child-rearing ideologies.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined social interaction as a mediator between externalized behaviour difficulties and children's engagement in preschool. Data from 663 children (340 boys), aged 18–71 months, were collected at 81 Swedish preschool units in six municipalities to test a path model that included child, teacher, and child groups. The results indicated that behaviour difficulties and engagement may occur simultaneously. Hyperactivity had a direct negative influence on engagement, which was not the case with conduct problems. Teachers’ responsiveness as well as positive interactions with peers had an indirect influence on the relationship between hyperactivity and engagement. Responsive staff and positive interactions within the child group seem to contribute to children's engagement despite hyperactivity. Children's engagement, as well as special support to stimulate engagement in preschool, is discussed.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: Although Asian Indians constitute one of the largest immigrant groups in the USA, research examining wellbeing among Indian immigrant families caring for a child with a developmental disability is relatively scarce. In response, this study examined the stressors and perceived quality of social support among Indian immigrant families of children and adolescents with a developmental disability in the USA. Thirty-three Indian immigrant parents of a child or an adolescent with a developmental disability participated in an online study. The participants reported a moderate level of stress overall, but over 54% participants considered long-term planning for accommodation, finding opportunities for child to make friends, child's diagnosis, and planning for socioemotional support as extremely stressful. Spouse and support groups were the most positively rated sources of support. Participant stress was negatively linked to perceived quality of formal support. This paper discusses the findings in the context of practice and research implications.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this research review is to synthesize research published between 2000 and 2015 regarding child sexual abuse, preschool and preschool teachers. The review identifies themes relevant for the preschool teacher profession: child sexual abuse at preschools, suspicions and consequences for the preschool sector, preventing techniques and the preschool teacher as a safeguarder. Furthermore, important types of tensions in efforts to safeguard against child sexual abuse are identified: the importance of listening to children and avoiding false allegations, the preschool teacher as a safeguarder and a potential abuser, and the importance of preventing child sexual abuse and providing qualitative care of children. Implications for the profession, the education of preschool teachers and the need for more research are addressed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: The article examines the relevance of compensatory education for educationally disadvantaged children of preschool age in Germany and beyond The article is a shortened, adapted and translated version of the paper Schmidt, T., & Smidt, W. (201465. Schmidt, T., & Smidt, W. (2014). Kompensatorische Förderung benachteiligter Kinder – Entwicklungslinien, Forschungsbefunde und heutige Bedeutung für die Frühpädagogik [Compensatory education for disadvantaged children – lines of development, research findings and present significance for early childhood education]. Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 60(1), 132–149.View all references). Kompensatorische Förderung benachteiligter Kinder – Entwicklungslinien, Forschungsbefunde und heutige Bedeutung für die Frühpädagogik. [Compensatory education for disadvantaged children – lines of development, research findings and present significance for early childhood education]. Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 60(1), 132–149. Beginning with its onset in the 1960s, key lines of the development of compensatory early childhood education in Germany are presented. Thereafter, significant national and international empirical findings on the effectiveness of compensatory early childhood education are identified. Based on that, the potential of this approach for the promotion of educationally disadvantaged young children in Germany and beyond is outlined.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Early Child Development and Care

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: A lack of adequate German language skills is often discussed as a major reason for the disadvantage of children of immigrants in the German educational system. This article analyses the access to formal and informal early education of Turkish-origin children in Germany and the influence of these early education contexts on the children's German language acquisition. We use the frequency of stimulating parent–child activities as an indicator of informal education and the attendance in language instruction programmes at preschool as an indicator of formal education. The empirical results show that the frequency of parent–child activities in Turkish-origin families depends on parents’ social background and German language skills. Language instruction programmes in preschools are most frequently used by children who most likely need such programmes: children with low levels of German language skills. For the development of German language skills, parent–child activities seem to be most important.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Early Child Development and Care
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    ABSTRACT: The present paper was written under the auspices of the interdisciplinary research group ‘Educational Processes, Competence Development, and Selection Decisions at Preschool and Primary School Age (BiKS)’ (FOR 543), funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The surveys were conceptualised and supervised as part of the developmental psychology sub-project (headed by S. Weinert) and the primary education sub-project (headed by H.-G. Roßbach). We would like to thank the German Research Foundation for funding the research group and the participating children, parents, early years educators, teachers, assistants, and members of staff for their commitment and cooperation.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Early Child Development and Care